• Water footprint assessment for coal-to-gas in China

      Wang, Jianliang; Liu, Xiaojie; Geng, Xu; Bentley, Yongmei; Zhang, Chunhua; Yang, Yuru (Springer, 2019-01-01)
      To increase its domestic gas production and achieve cleaner end-use utilization of its coal resources, China is actively promoting its coal-to-gas (CTG) industry. However, one of the major concerns for CTG development is the consequent significant water usage. To better understand this aspect, this paper presents a quantitative assessment of the water footprint (WF) for China’s CTG industry. The results show that the WF of CTG in China is typically in the region of 0.055 m3 water per cubic meter of produced gas. In addition, the analysis of the components of this WF indicates that most of the water resources are used both in the process of CTG production itself, and also in the dilute discharge of pollutants. In terms of the planned production capacity of China’s CTG projects, this paper finds that the water use in some regions of Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi and Liaoning may account 30–40% of regional water resources, which means the large-scale development of CTG projects may present significant risks to regional water resources. Therefore, this paper suggests that the status of regional water availability should be one of the key factors considered by policy makers in order to achieve sustainable development of the country’s CTG industry.
    • What is business information literacy and can the corporate librarian contribute anything to the discourse?

      Natt, Avtar (Taylor & Francis, 2013-03-28)
      The concept of business information literacy is explored through content analysis of scholarly literature and interviews with business information professionals in academic and corporate contexts. The business school librarian was found to prioritize library instruction whereas the conversion of information to competitive intelligence is important for the corporate librarian. The findings are also found to be part of wider debates surrounding information literacy and higher education. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
    • Wisdom appeals in UK Financial Services Advertising

      Czarnecka, Barbara; Evans, Jeff (Taylor & Francis, 2013-08-25)
      This paper reports on a study of mathematical images in UK press advertising, and in particular, on the use of wisdom appeals as expressed via such images in advertisements for financial services. Over 1,500 editions of nine newspapers were monitored for advertisements containing mathematical images. Content analysis was applied to produce an account of the use of mathematical images in advertising specifically for financial services. The findings indicate noteworthy differences in the use of mathematical images among different types of newspapers. This analysis provides insights into how advertisers use mathematical representations to create more "scientific" and trustworthy images of their brands.
    • Women's emancipation and civil society organisations : challenging or maintaining the status quo?

      Schwabenland, Christina; Lange, Chris; Onyx, Jenny; Nakagawa, Sachiko (Policy Press, 2016-10-16)
    • Working from home during Covid-19: doing and managing technology-enabled social interaction with colleagues at a distance

      Lal, Banita; Dwivedi, Yogesh Kumar; Haag, Markus; ; University of Bradford; Swansea University; University of Bedfordshire (Springer, 2021-08-27)
      With the overnight growth in Working from Home (WFH) owing to the pandemic, organisations and their employees have had to adapt work-related processes and practices quickly with a huge reliance upon technology. Everyday activities such as social interactions with colleagues must therefore be reconsidered. Existing literature emphasises that social interactions, typically conducted in the traditional workplace, are a fundamental feature of social life and shape employees' experience of work. This experience is completely removed for many employees due to the pandemic and, presently, there is a lack of knowledge on how individuals maintain social interactions with colleagues via technology when working from home. Given that a lack of social interaction can lead to social isolation and other negative repercussions, this study aims to contribute to the existing body of literature on remote working by highlighting employees' experiences and practices around social interaction with colleagues. This study takes an interpretivist and qualitative approach utilising the diary-keeping technique to collect data from twenty-nine individuals who had started to work from home on a full-time basis as a result of the pandemic. The study explores how participants conduct social interactions using different technology platforms and how such interactions are embedded in their working lives. The findings highlight the difficulty in maintaining social interactions via technology such as the absence of cues and emotional intelligence, as well as highlighting numerous other factors such as job uncertainty, increased workloads and heavy usage of technology that affect their work lives. The study also highlights that despite the negative experiences relating to working from home, some participants are apprehensive about returning to work in the traditional office place where social interactions may actually be perceived as a distraction. The main contribution of our study is to highlight that a variety of perceptions and feelings of how work has changed via an increased use of digital media while working from home exists and that organisations need to be aware of these differences so that they can be managed in a contextualised manner, thus increasing both the efficiency and effectiveness of working from home.
    • Working with values: an alternative approach to win-win

      Williams, Sarah; Preston, Diane; University of Bedfordshire; Open University (Inderscience, 2019-05-01)
      In this paper we offer an alternative perspective on the business case for why organisations should embrace the arguments for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In particular we look at the win-win scenario often posited by both internal and external agencies where it is not only the business who wins by adopting a CSR agenda but also the environment; save money - save the planet. Using a case study of a group of SME managers belonging to a Green Business network in the UK, we offer a different approach to relying on the traditional win-win scenario that assumes businesses and managers are motivated largely by financial gain. Instead, we show how a series of workshops were used based on Schwartz's Value System with the aim of helping the managers to, firstly understand their own values and motivations toward CSR and, secondly, how they could translate this to better understand the values of their own managers and colleagues with regard to embedding CSR practice. The aim of the paper is to highlight the value of taking a perspective on CSR at the individual level as well as offering a tool that managers could use in their own practice.