• Artificial Intelligence (AI): multidisciplinary perspectives on emerging challenges, opportunities, and agenda for research, practice and policy

      Dwivedi, Yogesh K.; Hughesa, Laurie; Ismagilova, Elvira; Aarts, Gert; Coombs, Crispin; Crick, Tom; Duan, Yanqing; Dwivedi, Rohita; Edwards, John; Eirug, Aled; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-08-27)
      As far back as the industrial revolution, significant development in technical innovation has succeeded in transforming numerous manual tasks and processes that had been in existence for decades where humans had reached the limits of physical capacity. Artificial Intelligence (AI) offers this same transformative potential for the augmentation and potential replacement of human tasks and activities within a wide range of industrial,intellectual and social applications. The pace of change for this new AI technological age is staggering, with new breakthroughs in algorithmic machine learning and autonomous decision-making, engendering new opportunities for continued innovation. The impact of AI could be significant, with industries ranging from: finance, healthcare, manufacturing, retail, supply chain, logistics and utilities, all potentially disrupted by the onset of AI technologies. The study brings together the collective insight from a number of leading expert contributors to highlight the significant opportunities, realistic assessment of impact, challenges and potential research agenda posed by the rapid emergence of AI within a number of domains: business and management, government, public sector, and science and technology. This research offers significant and timely insight to AI technology and its impact on the future of industry and society in general, whilst recognising the societal and industrial influence on pace and direction of AI development.
    • Enhancing student learning experience with technology-mediated gamification: an empirical study

      Tsay, Crystal Han-Huei; Kofinas, Alexander K.; Luo, Jing; University of Greenwich; University of Bedfordshire (Elsevier, 2018-01-31)
      We evaluated the use of gamification to facilitate a student- centered learning environment within an undergraduate Year 2 Personal and Professional Development (PPD) course. In addition to face-to-face classroom practices, an information technology-based gamified system with a range of online learning activities was presented to students as support material. The implementation of the gamified course lasted two academic terms. The subsequent evaluation from a cohort of 136 students indicated that student performance was significantly higher among those who participated in the gamified system than in those who engaged with the nongamified, traditional delivery, while behavioral engagement in online learning activities was positively related to course performance, after controlling for gender, attendance, and Year 1 PPD performance. Two interesting phenomena appeared when we examined the influence of student background: female students participated significantly more in online learning activities than male students, and students with jobs engaged significantly more in online learning activities than students without jobs. The gamified course design advocated in this work may have significant implications for educators who wish to develop engaging technology-mediated learning environments that enhance students' learning, or for a broader base of professionals who wish to engage a population of potential users, such as managers engaging employees or marketers engaging customers.
    • In favor of large classes: a social networks perspective on experiential learning

      Kofinas, Alexander K.; Tsay, Crystal Han-Huei; University of Bedfordshire; University of Greenwich (SAGE Publications Inc., 2021-06-15)
      Most of the literature has viewed large classes as a problem and a challenge. Furthermore, large classes are often presented to be an obstacle to students’ experiential learning and a multitude of solutions can be found in the literature to manage large classes; solutions that include innovative technologies, alternative assessment designs, or expanding the capacity of delivery. This conceptual paper advocates that large classes, when used intentionally as a pedagogical tool, can be a powerful means for socialized and experiential learning for our students. In this work we connect the phenomenon of large classes with social network theory and concepts to re-conceptualize large classes as a social micro-cosmos consisting of a multitude of interconnected student communities. On this conceptual basis we offer three positive features of large classes: (i) higher levels of freedom for students to learn in their own terms (ii) learning from a diverse body of students and (iii) the provision of meaningful experiences of learning. We conclude with suggestions that should enable educators in large classes shift from an individualistic psychology-based model of experiential learning to a sociological model of experiential learning.
    • Key success factors of using social media as a learning tool

      Kofinas, Alexander K.; Al-Shawakbeh, Abdallah; Lim, Andriew; University of Bedfordshire; University of Greenwich; HotelSchool The Hague (IGI Global, 2017-10-01)
      Students are dedicated and innovative users of Social Media; in the context of Higher Education they use such media in a pragmatic fashion to enhance their learning. Higher Education institutions are thus in a position to facilitate their students’ learning by embedding Social Media in their teaching and learning pedagogy. This chapter will discuss the Key Success Factors of using Social Media as a coordinating, managing, and learning tool to enhance students’ education in the context of Higher Education. The Key Success Factors are mapped along the communication and activity flows of the student’s study enterprise as viewed from an Actor-Network Theory lenses.
    • Stakeholders shaping experiences of self-funded international PhD students in UK business schools

      Mogaji, Emmanuel; Adamu, Nenadi; Nguyen, Nguyen Phong; University of Greenwich; University of Bedfordshire; University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City (Elsevier Ltd, 2021-07-22)
      Self-funded international PhD students bring substantial financial returns to universities, but they are often placed in a precarious position, caught between different identities and experiencing struggles that are peculiar to international students – liability for fees, which sometimes have to be raised during their study; visa restrictions that affect employability; and the solitary journey of their doctoral study. It is, therefore, important to recognise their unique positioning and understand how their experiences are being shaped and can be improved. Using qualitative data obtained through semi-structured interviews with 26 self-funded international PhD students in UK business schools, the analysis identified variations in experiences based on gender, marital status, and university group as significant to self-funded PhD students' experiences. The study also adopted the theory of student persistence and the multidimensional value-based approach to identify the role of university administrative systems, supervisors, fellow PhD students, social networks, families, and self-funded PhD students as key stakeholders shaping students’ learning experiences and maintaining their engagement, influencing completion rates, and affecting post-graduation outcomes. This study extended the existing knowledge on international student experiences and doctoral education, presenting vital implications for a range of stakeholders, including universities, post-graduate and business schools, academic and professional bodies, supervisors, and policymakers.