• Artificial intelligence for decision making in the era of Big Data – evolution, challenges and research agenda

      Duan, Yanqing; Edwards, John S.; Dwivedi, Yogesh Kumar; University of Bedfordshire; Aston University; Swansea University (Elsevier, 2019-02-07)
      Artificial intelligence (AI) has been in existence for over six decades and has experienced AI winters and springs. The rise of super computing power and Big Data technologies appear to have empowered AI in recent years. The new generation of AI is rapidly expanding and has again become an attractive topic for research. This paper aims to identify the challenges associated with the use and impact of revitalised AI based systems for decision making and offer a set of research propositions for information systems (IS) researchers. The paper first provides a view of the history of AI through the relevant papers published in the International Journal of Information Management (IJIM). It then discusses AI for decision making in general and the specific issues regarding the interaction and integration of AI to support or replace human decision makers in particular. To advance research on the use of AI for decision making in the era of Big Data, the paper offers twelve research propositions for IS researchers in terms of conceptual and theoretical development, AI technology-human interaction, and AI implementation.
    • Identifying the configurational paths to innovation in SMEs: a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis

      Poorkavoos, Meysam; Duan, Yanqing; Edwards, John S.; Ramanathan, Ramakrishnan; Roffey Park Institute; University of Bedfordshire; Aston University (Elsevier Inc., 2016-05-01)
      Using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA), this study investigates the conditions leading to a higher level of innovation. More specifically, the study explores the impact of inter-organisational knowledge transfer networks and organisations' internal capabilities on different types of innovation in Small to Medium size Enterprises (SMEs) in the high-tech sector. A survey instrument was used to collect data from a sample of UK SMEs. The findings show that although individual factors are important, there is no need for a company to perform well in all the areas. The fsQCA, which enables the examination of the impacts of different combinations of factors, reveals that there are a number of paths to achieve better incremental and radical innovation performance. Companies need to choose the one that is closest to their abilities and fits best with their resources.
    • Understanding managers’ attitudes and behavioral intentions towards using artificial intelligence for organizational decision-making

      Cao, Guangming; Duan, Yanqing; Edwards, John S.; Dwivedi, Yogesh Kumar; Ajman University; University of Bedfordshire; Aston University; Swansea University (Elsevier, 2021-06-08)
      While using artificial intelligence (AI) could improve organizational decision-making, it also creates challenges associated with the “dark side” of AI. However, there is a lack of research on managers’ attitudes and intentions to use AI for decision making. To address this gap, we develop an integrated AI acceptance-avoidance model (IAAAM) to consider both the positive and negative factors that collectively influence managers’ attitudes and behavioral intentions towards using AI. The research model is tested through a large-scale questionnaire survey of 269 UK business managers. Our findings suggest that IAAAM provides a more comprehensive model for explaining and predicting managers’ attitudes and behavioral intentions towards using AI. Our research contributes conceptually and empirically to the emerging literature on using AI for organizational decision-making. Further, regarding the practical implications of using AI for organizational decision-making, we highlight the importance of developing favorable facilitating conditions, having an effective mechanism to alleviate managers’ personal concerns, and having a balanced consideration of both the benefits and the dark side associated with using AI.
    • Understanding the impact of business analytics on innovation

      Duan, Yanqing; Cao, Guangming; Edwards, John S.; University of Bedfordshire; Aston University (Elsevier, 2018-06-20)
      Advances in Business Analytics in the era of Big Data have provided unprecedented opportunities for organizations to innovate. With insights gained from Business Analytics, companies are able to develop new or improved products/services. However, few studies have investigated the mechanism through which Business Analytics contributes to a firm's innovation success. This research aims to address this gap by theoretically and empirically investigating the relationship between Business Analytics and innovation. To achieve this aim, absorptive capacity theory is used as a theoretical lens to inform the development of a research model. Absorptive capacity theory refers to a firm’s ability to recognize the value of new, external information, assimilate it and apply it to commercial ends. The research model covers the use of Business Analytics, environmental scanning, data-driven culture, innovation (new product newness and meaningfulness), and competitive advantage. The research model is tested through a questionnaire survey of 218 UK businesses. The results suggest that Business Analytics directly improves environmental scanning which in turn helps to enhance a company's innovation. Business Analytics also directly enhances data-driven culture that in turn impacts on environmental scanning. Data-driven culture plays another important role by moderating the effect of environmental scanning on new product meaningfulness. The findings demonstrate the positive impact of business analytics on innovation and the pivotal roles of environmental scanning and data-driven culture. Organizations wishing to realize the potential of Business Analytics thus need changes in both their external and internal focus.