• ‘The language is disgusting and they refer to my disability’: the cyberharassment of disabled people

      Alhaboby, Zhraa Azhr; al-Khateeb, Haider; Barnes, Jim; Short, Emma; ; University of Bedfordshire (Routledge, 2016-10-05)
      Disabled people face hostility and harassment in their socio-cultural environment. The use of electronic communications creates an online context that further reshapes this discrimination. We explored the experiences of 19 disabled victims of cyberharassment. Five themes emerged from the study: disability and health consequences, family involvement, misrepresentation of self, perceived complexity, and lack of awareness and expertise. Cyberharassment incidents against disabled people were influenced by the pre-existing impairment, perceived hate-targeting, and perpetrators faking disability to get closer to victims online. Our findings highlight a growing issue requiring action and proper support.
    • Language, trust and transformation: exploring theatre as a research method with migrant youth

      Opfermann, Lena S.; Durham University (Taylor and Francis, 2019-07-29)
      This article explores the challenges and benefits of using theatre as a research method. It questions certain claims and assumptions underlying Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed and more recent literature on theatre-based research. In particular, it investigates the notion that theatre enables participants to address issues of oppression and create socio-political change. Based on a case study with migrant youth in South Africa, the article firstly argues that certain challenges specific to working with migrants such as differing language skills and a lack of trust may impede genuine dialogic exchange as envisioned by Boal. Secondly, it shows how these challenges can be overcome by incorporating writing exercises, video recordings and embodied communication. Finally, the article argues that theatre-based research can indeed create individual transformations in the form of increased displays of ownership, confidence and hope. These insights contribute to the growing literature on theatre-based research and will be useful for others using similar arts-based approaches.
    • Last resort or best interest? exploring risk and safety factors that inform rates of relocation for young people abused in extra-familial settings

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Wroe, Lauren; Bernard, D.; (Oxford University Press, 2021-05-06)
      When young people are harmed in extra-familial settings children’s services may place them into care at a distance from their home authority to remove them from contexts in which they are considered ‘at risk’. Guidance and regulation suggest such intervention be used as a last resort and only in a child’s best interests. Using survey and interview data, this paper examines how relocations are used in response to extra-familial harm in 13 children’s services departments in England and Wales – exploring the extent to which they are intended to mitigate risk, or build safety, for young people. Findings demonstrate that rates at which relocations were used varied across participating services. Interview data suggests that variation may be informed by the strategic position a service takes on the use of relocation, the goal(s) of interventions used in cases of extra-familial harm, and the target of these interventions. In considering each of these factors the authors recommend further study into the national (varying) rates of relocation and the role of those who review care-plans for relocated young people; both intending to create conditions in which young people can safely return to their communities should they choose to do so
    • Layered and linking research partnerships: learning from YOUR World Research in Ethiopia and Nepal

      Johnson, Vicky; Admassu, Anannia; Church, Andrew; Healey, Jill; Mathema, Sujeeta (Institute of Development Studies, 2019-05-01)
      This article draws on learning from the YOUR World Research project in Ethiopia and Nepal, which uses the socioecological Change‑scape framework to understand how participants in research need to be understood within a landscape of changing institutional, environmental, and political contexts. The article explores whether trustful relationships, ownership, and commitment can bring about more effective societal change through research. Through group discussion and reflective perspectives, the authors draw out possible indicators of successful partnership from the different contexts in which YOUR World Research was working. These include histories of interpersonal relationships; shared vision and motivations; building ownership; shared platforms and spaces for dialogue; and flexibility to respond to shocks and changes in context. The article suggests that whilst being realistic about the power and politics of partnership, there are mechanisms in partnership models that can help support high-quality rigorous research whilst creating impact at local, national, and international levels.
    • Learning about online sexual harm

      Beckett, Helen; Warrington, Camille; Devlin, Jacqui Montgomery; Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, 2019-11-14)
      This research was commissioned by the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (the Inquiry), as part of its investigation into institutional responses to child sexual abuse and exploitation facilitated by the internet. It was a small-scale, mixed-methods study which aimed to explore children’s and young people’s perspectives on: being online; risks of online sexual harm; education received about online sexual harm within state school settings; how such education could be improved; and what else should be done to better protect children and young people from online sexual harm.
    • Learning from safeguarding adult reviews on self-neglect: addressing the challenge of change

      Preston-Shoot, Michael; University of Bedfordshire (Emerald, 2018-02-20)
      Abstract   Purpose – One purpose is to update the core data set of self-neglect safeguarding adult reviews and accompanying thematic analysis. A second purpose is to address the challenge of change, exploring the necessary components beyond an action plan to ensure that findings and recommendations are embedded in policy and practice.   Design/methodology/approach – Further published reviews are added to the core data set from the web sites of Safeguarding Adults Boards. Thematic analysis is updated using the four domains employed previously. The repetitive nature of the findings prompts questions about how to embed policy and practice change, to ensure impactful use of learning from SARs. A framework for taking forward an action plan derived from SAR findings and recommendations is presented.   Findings – Familiar, even repetitive findings emerge once again from the thematic analysis. This level of analysis enables an understanding of both local geography and the national legal, policy and financial climate within which it sits. Such learning is valuable in itself, contributing to the evidence-base of what good practice with adults who self-neglect looks like. However, to avoid the accusation that lessons are not learned, something more than a straightforward action plan to implement the recommendations is necessary. A framework is conceptualised for a strategic and longer-term approach to embedding policy and practice change.   Research limitations/implications – There is still no national database of reviews commissioned by SABs so the data set reported here might be incomplete. The Care Act 2014 does not require publication of reports but only a summary of findings and recommendations in SAB annual reports. This makes learning for service improvement challenging. Reading the reviews reported here enables conclusions to be reached about issues to address locally and nationally to transform adult safeguarding policy and practice.   Practical implications – Answering the question “how to create sustainable change” is a significant challenge for safeguarding adult reviews. A framework is presented here, drawn from research on change management and learning from the review process itself. The critique of serious case reviews challenges those now engaged in safeguarding adult reviews to reflect on how transformational change can be achieved to improve the quality of adult safeguarding policy and practice.   Originality/value – The paper extends the thematic analysis of available reviews that focus on work with adults who self-neglect, further building on the evidence base for practice. The paper also contributes new perspectives to the process of following up safeguarding adult reviews by using the findings and recommendations systematically within a framework designed to embed change in policy and practice.     Keywords: Safeguarding adult reviews, change, self-neglect, action plans   Paper type: Research paper
    • Leaving care in the UK and Scandinavia: is it all that different in contrasting welfare regimes?

      Munro, Emily; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine; Hollingworth, Katie (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2016-12-01)
    • Leeds Partners in Practice: reimagining child welfare services for the 21st century: final evaluation report

      Harris, Julie Philippa; Tinarwo, Moreblessing; Ramanathan, Ramakrishnan; University of Bedfordshire (Department for Education, 2020-04-30)
      Leeds introduced restorative practice in Round 1 of the Department for Education’s (DfE) Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme through ‘Family Valued’ (March 2015 to December 2016): a workforce development programme amongst children’s services, partners and Family Group Conferencing (FGC) as an approach to working with families through FGC. Restorative practice recognises the strengths and resources that families have available to them. It aims to engage individuals as active participants in identifying problems and finding solutions. In so doing, it underlines the importance of doing ‘with’ families rather than ‘for’ or ‘to’, thus achieving greater collaboration between families and services towards common goals. In 2010, a city-wide locality model introduced 25 geographical ‘clusters’ based on the ‘Extended Schools’ service model. Cluster services provide parenting support and early help, and other targeted support services, alongside education. Children’s services were re-configured to align with these areas with the aim of improving multi-agency working and co-ordination. The Family Valued programme identified six clusters that collectively receive 50 per cent of referrals for children’s services in Leeds, indicating high levels of need and high demand for services. A seventh geographical area of high need and demand for services was identified and incorporated into the programme.
    • Legacies of indenture: identity and belonging in post-colonial Jamaica

      Zacharias, Thomas A.; Mullings-Lawrence, Sireita; Goldsmiths, University of London; University of Bedfordshire (Routledge, 2020-01-27)
      This article examines narratives of identity and belonging among descendants of white German indentured labourers in Jamaica and the local community in which they live. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork and qualitative interviews the research shows the ways in which members of the community in the village of Seaford Town make sense of and articulate elements of their German cultural heritage. This paper argues that while ideas about whiteness suffuse many of the identity-narratives, whiteness can variously be muted or amplified as a marker of identity. Similarly, notions of German-ness are not consistently articulated as embodied cultural forms. Here, culture is not conceptualized as static or embodied, but can be claimed and shared. In sum, the paper speaks to the ways in which whiteness read through a historical lens becomes remade in a contemporary context.
    • The legal and policy framework for contextual safeguarding approaches: a 2020 update on the 2018 legal briefing

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Knowles, Rachel; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2020-10-31)
      This briefing considers the extent to which changes made to Working Together to Safeguard Children in 2018, and the existing legislative underpinning that guidance, provide a sufficient policy and practice framework for adopting a Contextual Safeguarding approach. It presents the key messages that emerged from a legal roundtable held in 2020, alongside emergent data from the Contextual Safeguarding programme.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life

      Wiseman, T.; Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew (2018-07-19)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The narratives about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind 2012) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone 2011, Smith 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley 2008). The rich and insightful reports from the correspondents of the mass observation archive record in great detail the lives that people are living, and how they feel about them. There is not currently a grand narrative to lead us in this uncharted extended later life. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories, not based on historical generalisations, but on the carefully reported everyday lives of people that know.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life: early findings

      Wiseman, T.; Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew (2017-07-05)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The narratives about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind 2012) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone 2011, Smith 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley 2008). The rich and insightful reports from the correspondents of the mass observation archive record in great detail the lives that people are living, and how they feel about them. There is not currently a grand narrative to lead us in this uncharted extended later life. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories, not based on historical generalisations, but on the carefully reported everyday lives of people that know.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life: working with the Mass Observation Project

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2017-07-11)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The stories about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form which is used in leisure studies research and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way. Finding a comfortable lifestyle is an art, and taking the lead from those that have gone before is not possible for this ‘new’ cohort. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase of life. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories.
    • Levels of stress and anxiety in child and family social work: workers' perceptions of organizational structure, professional support and workplace opportunities in Children's Services in the UK

      Antonopoulou, Vivi; Killian, Mike; Forrester, Donald; University of Bedfordshire; University of Texas at Arlington; University of Cardiff (Elsevier, 2017-02-24)
      Child and family social workers are consistently found to have high levels of stress, and this has often been linked to burnout and retention problems in the profession. Local authorities in the UK have recently been under pressure to reform services, and one focus has been exploring how different organizational structures might reduce stress and increase well-being of workers. This paper presents data on 193 social workers from five local authorities in England. We examine the effects of different ways of organizing Children's Services on workers' wellbeing, with particular focus on the underlying relationship between organizational elements, workplace opportunities,and practitioners' work satisfaction. The primary outcome measure is the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1978), a widely validated measure of stress. This data is presented alongside information exploring aspects of organizational structure and functioning. Results indicated significantly different levels of reported stress and general well-being in practitioners working in different local authorities. Implications for how local authorities might support staff to work productively in the stressful and challenging environment of child and family social work are discussed.
    • Life in a lanyard: developing an ethics of embedded research methods in children’s social care

      Lloyd, Jenny; University of Bedfordshire (Emerald, 2021-07-05)
      Purpose: To consider the opportunities for embedded methodologies for research into children’s social care and the ethics of this method. Design: The study draws upon embedded research from a two year study into developing children’s social work approaches to extra-familial risk. Findings draw upon personal reflections from field notes, case reviews, practice observations and reflections. Findings: Two findings are presented. Firstly, that Embedded Research provides numerous opportunities to develop child protection systems and practice. Secondly, a number of ethical questions and challenges of the methodology are presented. Limitations: the article draws upon personal reflections from one study and is not intended to be representative of all approaches to embedded research methods. Practical implications: Two practical recommendations are presented. Firstly I outline a number of recommendations to university researchers and host organisations on the facilitative attributes for embedded researchers. Secondly, questions are raised to support university ethics boards to assist ethical frameworks for embedded research. Originality: the article contributes original empirical data to the limited literature on embedded research in children’s services.
    • Listening to grandparents from a range of ethnic communities: the methodological implications

      Schild, L.; Ali, Nasreen (British Society of Gerontology, 1997-01-01)
    • Living in gang affected neighbourhoods

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Pearce, Jenny J. (Jessica Kingsley, 2016-01-01)
    • Living in gang-affected neighbourhoods

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Pearce, Jenny J.; Bernard, Claudia; Harris, Perlita; University of Bedfordshire; Goldsmiths (Jessica Kingsley, 2016-05-05)
      This chapter addresses the problems facing black children living in gang affected neighborhoods. It argues for a 'social model' for understanding and responding to children's capacity to consent to sexual activity when forced and coerced within gang affected neighborhoods and for a contextual framework to child protection issues facing these young people, their neighborhood and environment. 
    • Local democracy, cross-border collaboration and the internationalisation of local government

      Church, Andrew; Reid, Peter (Palgrave Macmillan, 2002-08-31)
      Local government organisations in many countries are now involved in significant transnational cooperative initiatives. This internationalisation of local governance takes many different forms, ranging from informal cultural exchanges to attempts to influence the actions of foreign state governments. It also has important implications for the politics and the management of local government. The existing evidence suggests transnational exchange may stimulate policy innovation and new thinking, but it can also generate significant problems in terms of accountability, strategic vision, initiative management and policy effectiveness. This chapter takes a critical view of one form of transnational cooperation, cross-border collaboration, and argues that the benefits of this activity are elusive and the problems encountered are slow to be overcome.