• ICPR2017 – The Fourth International Conference on Practice Research: overview

      Chin, Ci-Siou; Ciro, Diane; Fisher, Mike; Ji, Clara; Begum, Razwana; Rahim, Abdul; Lien. Ying; Kay-yu Wu, Florence; University of Bedfordshire (IASSW, 2017-10-09)
      This paper reports issues arising from the Fourth International Conference on Practice Research, held in Hong Kong in May 2017. The issues were identified by specially convened group of conference participants, and include the need to develop a better language to describe practice research in terms that make sense to practitioners, improved support for practitioners to conduct research, recognising the different drivers for practice research in different countries, and enhancing practitioners' coordinating and leadership roles.
    • 'If you can't beat them, be them!' - everyday experiences and 'performative agency' among undocumented migrant youth in South Africa

      Opfermann, Lena S.; Durham University (Taylor and Francis, 2019-07-22)
      This article explores the challenges and coping strategies of undocumented migrant youth in Cape Town, South Africa. Drawing on a theatre-based case study conducted with a core group of 10 participants the article shows firstly that participants’ lives are affected by emotional, legal and practical challenges such as loneliness, discrimination and fear. Secondly, the article develops the concept of ‘performative agency’ to illustrate how participants cope with and contest their challenges. Specifically, the article shows that the young people's theatrical performances draw on stereotypical notions of vulnerability and victimhood as a means to denounce the discrimination and oppression they experience. In public interactions with others, by contrast, the young migrants use performative agency to emphasise their strengths and positive attributes, thereby enhancing their integration in a hostile environment. The insights provided by this study can help strengthen policy responses to better support undocumented migrant youth in South Africa and elsewhere.
    • The impact of cyberstalking: review and analysis of the ECHO pilot project

      Short, Emma; Maple, Carsten (IADIS, 2011-12-31)
      The impact of cyberstalking on victims is increasing rapidly due to the spread and heightened importance of electronic communications in modern society. This paper reports the results of a survey concerning the methods and impact of cyberstalking. The ECHO (Electronic Communication Harassment Observation) pilot project was a six month survey developed in collaboration with The Network for Surviving Stalking to establish a knowledgebase to define behaviours and responses which may enable authorities to recognize and respond to cyberstalking more quickly and effectively. The diversity of population that has experienced sustained online harassment and the particular trauma related thoughts and beliefs that victims experience are also investigated.
    • The impact of cyberstalking: the lived experience - a thematic analysis

      Short, Emma; Linford, Sarah; Wheatcroft, Jacqueline M.; Maple, Carsten; (Virtual reality med institute, 2014-12-31)
      Cyberstalking (CS) can have major psychosocial impacts on individuals. Victims report a number of serious consequences of victimization such as increased suicidal ideation, fear, anger, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomology. Research is largely limited to quantitative outcome research. This study examines the diversity of experiences reported by people who define themselves as having been cyberstalked. Thematic analysis was used to explore 100 CS victim narratives, gathered by means of an online survey questionnaire designed to capture structured text responses. Five emergent themes were evident in the data: control and intimidation; determined offender; development of harassment; negative consequences; and lack of support. Findings identify similarities and differences to traditional stalking, along with the necessity of support for victims and illustration of the negative impacts this form of harassment produces.
    • The impact of more flexible assessment practices in response to the Munro Review of Child Protection: a rapid response follow-up

      Munro, Emily; Stone, Judith; Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre (Department for Education, 2014-08-01)
      Between April and July 2012 the Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre was commissioned to undertake a rapid response study to independently evaluate the impact that the flexibilities had had on practice and service responses to safeguard children from harm (Munro and Lushey, 2012). Findings formed part of a package of evidence used to inform revisions to Working Together to Safeguard Children: a guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children (HM Government, 2013). The revised statutory guidance came into force on 5 April 2013 and removed the requirement to conduct separate initial and core assessments.  
    • The impacts of child sexual abuse: a rapid evidence assessment

      Fisher, Cate; Goldsmith, Alexandra; Hurcombe, Rachel; Soares, Claire; IICSA Research Team (Independent Inquiry into Child Sex Abuse, 2017-07-31)
      The aim of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA or ‘the Inquiry’) is to investigate whether public bodies and other non-state institutions have taken seriously their responsibility to protect children from sexual abuse in England and Wales, and to make meaningful recommendations for change, to help ensure that children now and in the future are better protected from sexual abuse. Child sexual abuse (CSA) involves forcing or enticing a child or young person under the age of 18 to take part in sexual activities. It includes contact and non-contact abuse, child sexual exploitation (CSE) and grooming a child in preparation for abuse. As part of its work, the Inquiry is seeking to examine the impacts of child sexual abuse on the lives of victims and survivors and their families, as well as the impacts on wider society. These questions are of cross-cutting relevance to the work of the Inquiry. They have particular salience for its ‘Accountability and Reparations’ investigation, which is exploring the extent to which existing support services and legal processes effectively deliver accountability and reparation to victims and survivors.
    • Implementing the United Kingdom's ten-year teenage pregnancy strategy for England (1999-2010): how was this done and what did it achieve?

      Hadley, Alison; Ingham, Roger; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; University of Bedfordshire; University of Southampton; World Health Organisation (2016-11-22)
      In 1999, the UK Labour Government launched a 10-year Teenage Pregnancy Strategy for England to address the country's historically high rates and reduce social exclusion. The goal was to halve the under-18 conception rate. This study explores how the strategy was designed and implemented, and the features that contributed to its success. This study was informed by examination of the detailed documentation of the strategy, published throughout its 10-year implementation. The strategy involved a comprehensive programme of action across four themes: joined up action at national and local level; better prevention through improved sex and relationships education and access to effective contraception; a communications campaign to reach young people and parents; and coordinated support for young parents (The support programme for young parents was an important contribution to the strategy. In the short term by helping young parents prevent further unplanned pregnancies and, in the long term, by breaking intergenerational cycles of disadvantage and lowering the risk of teenage pregnancy.). It was implemented through national, regional and local structures with dedicated funding for the 10-year duration. The under-18 conception rate reduced steadily over the strategy's lifespan. The 2014 under-18 conception rate was 51% lower than the 1998 baseline and there have been significant reductions in areas of high deprivation. One leading social commentator described the strategy as 'The success story of our time' (Toynbee, The drop in teenage pregnancies is the success story of our time, 2013). As rates of teenage pregnancy are influenced by a web of inter-connected factors, the strategy was necessarily multi-faceted in its approach. As such, it is not possible to identify causative pathways or estimate the relative contributions of each constituent part. However, we conclude that six key features contributed to the success: creating an opportunity for action; developing an evidence based strategy; effective implementation; regularly reviewing progress; embedding the strategy in wider government programmes; and providing leadership throughout the programme. The learning remains relevant for the UK as England's teenage birth rate remains higher than in other Western European countries. It also provides important lessons for governments and policy makers in other countries seeking to reduce teenage pregnancy rates. BACKGROUND METHODS RESULTS CONCLUSIONS
    • In search of the Carolingian 'dear lord'

      Stone, Rachel; Fouracre, P.; Ganz, D. (Manchester University Press, 2008-06-01)
    • ‘In what way can those who have left the world be distinguished?’: Masculinity and the Difference between Carolingian Men

      Stone, Rachel; Beattie, Cordelia; Fenton, Kirsten A.; University of Bedfordshire; University of Edinburgh; University of St Andrews (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011-01-01)
    • The individual and contextual characteristics of young people who sexually harm in groups: a briefing on the findings from a study in four London boroughs

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Lloyd, Jenny; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2017-11-30)
      This briefing presents the findings of a study into the contextual profiles of young people suspected of displaying harmful sexual behaviours (HSB) in groups and/or on their own. It builds upon an international literature review into group-based HSB to: • explore the profiles of 49 young people who displayed HSB either in groups, on their own or in both contexts; • identify any differences between these cohorts of young people, and; • consider the implications for service design, delivery and commissioning. In a period when peer-on-peer abuse, sexual violence in schools and responses to young people affected by sexual abuse are high on the public and policy agenda, this briefing provides a timely contribution towards deepening how HSB is understood and in addition, ensuring that the provision of services is sufficient for safeguarding young people. In this sense the primary purpose of this briefing is to inform the commissioning, design and delivery of responses to HSB. Additional research publications will be produced to further explore the findings of the study upon which this briefing has been built.
    • Innovation in practice learning: messages from the review of a student-centred unit

      Cornish, Sally; White, Jacqueline (Taylor & Francis, 2014-05-19)
      Social work education in England is currently undergoing a process of review and change reflecting broader reforms in the profession as a whole. It is therefore timely to identify the achievements of the Centre for the Development of Social Care Practice at the University of Bedfordshire which since 2006 has offered a range of practice learning opportunities to social work students in partnership with the local authority and with the participation of service users and carers. This article places this initiative in the context of other broadly similar non-traditional practice learning provision and reviews recent feedback to identify its particular characteristics. Strengths in the provision of student-centred and empowering practice learning are explored and the need for further evaluation acknowledged.
    • Innovations in joint working: where is the evidence?

      Cameron, A.; Lart, Rachel; Bostock, Lisa (Universitetsforlaget., 2014-01-01)
      Cameron, A., Lart, R. and L. Bostock (2014) Innovations in joint working: where is the evidence? In Willumsen, E. Sirnes, T. and ødegård, A. (eds.) Interprofessional collaboration in theory and practice: the next generation. Oslo: Universitetsforlaget.
    • An interactional analysis of one-to-one pastoral care delivery within a primary school

      Bradley, Louise; Butler, Carly W.; Coventry University (Routledge, 2016-10-20)
      Despite an interactional analysis being able to offer valuable insight into the institutional workings of pastoral care practice, pastoral care delivery remains largely unstudied. This paper will contribute new knowledge to the field of counselling and education by offering an interactional analysis of one-to-one pastoral care provision within a primary school. Much pastoral care practice is informed by theory, often accompanied by guidelines about how to deliver pastoral care activities effectively. The pastoral carer needs to convert these guidelines into talk in order to deliver the intervention as an interactional encounter. However useful these guidelines are, they cannot show what the actual delivery of those pastoral care activities might look like in real life. Using conversation analysis, we examine video recordings of pastoral care delivery to reveal the ways in which a pastoral carer supports a child’s behaviour, social and emotional well-being. The significance of the findings is that those who provide pastoral care can see in close detail what delivery might look like as a real-life encounter, imparting valuable knowledge that can then be applied alongside theory and guidelines to enhance professional practice. Of further significance is that the findings can also show how an interactional analysis of pastoral care work can be used to demonstrate social and emotional learning and that the work being done effectively supports children.
    • Interprofessional staff supervision in health and social care

      Bostock, Lisa (Pavilion Publishing, 2015-12-11)
      This book is about what makes interprofessional supervision a success. There has been an international shift toward this form of supervision, driven by a broad consensus that multidisciplinary teams produce better outcomes for service users, combined with a cost saving agenda in which integrated working is seen as the key to increased financial efficiency. Yet it is an area where practice is ahead of the research; few studies have investigated how best to deliver effective supervision across disciplinary boundaries. What evidence exists tends to focus on services for children and there is a dearth of information on supervising staff working in adult services.  This book represents an opportunity to address this gap in the evidence base and offers approaches to staff supervision from across a variety of different professional perspectives and practice settings. It draws together a unique blend of researchers, practitioners and service users who identify both the opportunities and challenges of interprofessional supervision, as well as explore what works best in which context, for whom and why. It is concerned with the outcomes of this type of supervision for organisations, workers and ultimately service users. Contributions cover social work, healthcare (including hospitals, nursing and midwifery), residential care, community learning disability, mental health and addiction services as well as supervision of personal assistants. The book looks beyond the UK and presents international evidence of the incidence and experience of interprofessional supervision with contributions from Canada and New Zealand.  The book is divided into three sections. The first part provides an international overview of key research on interprofessional supervision. It includes an update on recent UK policy and practice developments as well as a discussion of service user involvement in staff supervision. The second section looks at innovative approaches to supervision and explores models developed in a variety of practice domains. The third section provides personal accounts of peoples’ experiences of this type of supervision and includes contributions from service managers and service users. It concludes with reflections on the core themes of the book, making suggestions for ‘where next?’ for research on supervision in adult services. 
    • Intervention fidelity in the definitive cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP) trial: findings from the process evaluation

      Lloyd, Jenny; Dean, Sarah; Creanor, Siobhan; Abraham, Charles; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Ryan, Emma; Wyatt, Katrina M.; (BioMed Central Ltd., 2017-11-28)
      Background: The Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP) was a novel school-located intervention for 9-10year olds, designed to prevent obesity by changing patterns of child behaviour through the creation of supportive school and home environments using dynamic and creative delivery methods. This paper reports on both the quantitative and qualitative data regarding the implementation of the HeLP intervention in the definitive cluster randomised controlled trial, which was part of the wider process evaluation. Methods: Mixed methods were used to collect data on intervention uptake, fidelity of delivery in terms of content and quality of delivery of the intervention, as well as school and child engagement with the programme. Data were collected using registers of attendance, observations and checklists, field notes, focus groups with children and semi-structured interviews with teachers. Qualitative data were analysed thematically and quantitative data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results: All 16 intervention schools received a complete or near complete programme (94-100%), which was delivered in the spirit in which it had been designed. Of the 676 children in the intervention schools, over 90% of children participated in each phase of HeLP; 92% of children across the socio-economic spectrum were deemed to be engaged with HeLP and qualitative data revealed a high level of enjoyment by all children, particularly to the interactive drama workshops. Further evidence of child engagment with the programme was demonstrated by children's clear understanding of programme messages around marketing, moderation and food labelling. Thirteen of the intervention schools were deemed to be fully engaged with HeLP and qualitative data revealed a high level of teacher 'buy in', due to the programme's compatability with the National Curriculum, level of teacher support and use of innovative and creative delivery methods by external drama practitioners. Conclusion: Our trial shows that it is possible to successfully scale up complex school-based interventions, engage schools and children across the socio-economic spectrum and deliver an intervention as designed. As programme integrity was maintained throughout the HeLP trial, across all intervention schools, we can be confident that the trial findings are a true reflection of the effectiveness of the intervention, enabling policy recommendations to be made. Trial registration: ISRCTN15811706.
    • Introduction to the study exploring peer support initiatives for young people who have experienced sexual violence: research findings: briefing paper one

      Cody, Claire; Bovarnick, Silvie; Peace, Delphine; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2020-04-30)
      The key questions explored in this study into ‘peer support’3 were: What do peer support initiatives for young people (aged 10-24) who have experienced sexual violence look like and involve? How are peer support initiatives experienced and received by the young people and professionals involved? What is the value of peer support initiatives for those involved? What are the challenges and barriers linked to these forms of support? A number of activities were undertaken as part of this study. This included: Undertaking a literature review to identify relevant evidence and key themes to explore further in the study. Circulating a ‘call for evidence’ for information about, and materials related to, peer support initiatives for young people who had experienced sexual violence. Developing an online survey to enable individuals to share their experiences of peer support initiatives. Undertaking interviews with key informants. The call for evidence and survey resulted in limited responses and therefore the research team, through contacts and online searches, identified and proactively contacted 18 organisations and initiatives providing peer support for young people affected by sexual violence. Representatives from 12 of these organisations and initiatives responded and agreed to take part in the study. Following this, semi-structured individual or group interviews were undertaken online or face-to-face with a total of 25 key informants from these 12 organisations and initiatives.
    • The invention of a theology of abduction: Hincmar of Rheims on raptus

      Stone, Rachel; University of Bedfordshire (Cambridge University Press, 2009-07-01)