• Accessibility and suitability of residential alcohol treatment for older adults

      Wadd, Sarah; Dutton, Maureen; Alcohol Research UK; University of Bedfordshire (Alcohol Research UK, 2017-11-20)
      This study sought to find out:- 1.       To what extent do residential alcohol rehabs have upper age thresholds? 2.       Are the needs of older adults different from those of younger adults in alcohol rehab? 3.       What are older adults’ experiences of alcohol rehab?
    • Accessibility and suitability of residential alcohol treatment for older adults: a mixed method study

      Wadd, Sarah; Dutton, Maureen; University of Bedfordshire (BMC, 2018-12-13)
      Background Whilst alcohol misuse is decreasing amongst younger adults in many countries, it is increasing in older adults. Residential rehabilitation (rehab) is a vital component of the alcohol treatment system, particularly for those with relatively complex needs and entrenched alcohol problems. In this study, we sought to find out to what extent rehabs in England have upper age limits that exclude older adults, whether rehabs are responsive to older adults’ age-related needs and how older adults experience these services. Method This is a mixed method study. A search was carried out of Public Health England’s online directory of rehabs to identify upper age thresholds. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 individuals who had attended one of five residential rehabs in England and Wales since their 50th birthday. A researcher with experience of a later life alcohol problem conducted the interviews. Results Of the 118 services listed on Public Health England’s online directory of rehabs, 75% stated that they had an upper age limit that would exclude older adults. Perceived differences in values, attitudes and behaviour between younger and older residents had an impact on older residents’ experience of rehab. Activities organised by the rehabs were often based on physical activity that some older adults found it difficult to take part in and this could create a sense of isolation. Some older adults felt unsafe in rehab and were bullied, intimidated and subjected to ageist language and attitudes. Conclusion This study identified direct and indirect age discrimination in rehabs contrary to the law. Further research is required to find out if age discrimination exists in rehabs in other countries. Rehabs should remove arbitrary age limits and ensure that they are responsive to the needs of older adults.
    • Action to end child sexual abuse and exploitation: a review of the evidence

      Radford, Lorraine; Allnock, Debra; Hynes, Patricia; Shorrock, Sarah; UNICEF and End Violence Against Children; University of Central Lancashire; University of Bedfordshire (UNICEF and End Violence Against Children, 2020-12-01)
      Child sexual abuse and exploitation is prevalent in all countries of the world and has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents. This report commissioned by UNICEF: * describes what is known about the extent, nature and consequences of child sexual abuse and exploitation; * reviews the evidence on effective interventions and strategies to prevent and respond; * synthesises these findings within the overarching INSPIRE and RESPECT strategic approach for violence prevention to recommend specific actions to prevent and respond to child sexual abuse and exploitation.
    • Addressing the needs of older adults receiving alcohol treatment during the Covid-19 pandemic: a qualitative study

      Seddon, Jennifer L.; Trevena, Paulina; Wadd, Sarah; Elliott, Lawrie; Dutton, Maureen; McCann, Michelle; Willmott, Sarah; Breslin, Julie; Glasgow Caledonian University; University of Bedfordshire (Drink Wise Age Well, 2020-12-09)
      This study aims to better understand the impact of the pandemic on older alcohol service users aged 55+ and alcohol service providers. The key aims of the study are to: 1 Explore the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown on older service users, including on their alcohol consumption. 2 Identify how alcohol services have adapted and supported older service users, and how staff experienced these changes. 3 Identify the short and long-term implications for service provision, and how service responses could be improved.
    • Alcohol use in older adults: analysis of UK survey and alcohol treatment data

      Wadd, Sarah; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2020-12-10)
      This report provides an analysis of data from 15,753 people aged 50 and over who took part in an alcohol survey or attended alcohol services to get help with their drinking during 2015-2020.
    • Applying thresholds to extra-familial harm: learning from Hackney’s Child Wellbeing Framework

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Owens, Rachael; Peace, Delphine; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2019-10-31)
      The Hackney Child Wellbeing Framework provides a framework for Hackney’s Children and Families Service, partner services and agencies to determine the right intervention for a child and a family, including which services should respond and what is required for a statutory intervention. The document proposes three levels of intervention: Universal: a response by universal services, often working individually. Within an extra-familial scenario, this also includes ensuring safety for young people within universally available leisure and recreational provision. Universal Plus/Universal Partnership Plus: a response by universal services working together in universal settings and sometimes bringing additional targeted resources into a multi-agency partnership plan to both assess and address concerns. Complex and/or High Risk: a response that requires multi-agency and/or specialist services, often governed by statutory frameworks, to take the lead role. The document considers these levels of interventions in relations to different domains including children’s health, emotional health, wellbeing and behaviour; education; neighbourhood; family and parenting.
    • Auditing your local response to peer-on-peer abuse

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; MsUnderstood Partnership; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-07-20)
      In 2013, 40 local safeguarding children boards (LSCBs) applied to the MsUnderstood Partnership1 (MSU) for support in building their response to peer-on-peer abuse. 11 LSCBs were selected and since January 2014 we have worked with them to develop responses to peer-on-peer abuse. This briefing explains our approach to the first phase of the support process – a local audit, and is intended to support other areas to audit their own response to peer-on-peer abuse.
    • Australian social work research: an empirical study of engagement and impact

      Tilbury, Clare; Bigby, Christine; Fisher, Mike; Hughes, Mark; Griffith University; La Trobe University; University of Bedfordshire; Southern Cross University (Oxford University Press, 2020-12-03)
      Internationally, non-academic research impact is assessed by governments as part of evaluating the quality of publicly funded research. A case study method was used to investigate the non-academic impact of Australian social work research. Interviews were conducted with 15 leading researchers about outputs (research products, such as publications and reports), engagement (interaction between researchers and end-users outside academia to transfer knowledge, methods, or resources), and impact (social or economic contributions of research). Twelve case studies were prepared using a standardised template. Content analysis highlighted examples of impact, and theoretical and in-vivo coding uncovered processes of engagement and impact. Different types of engagements with research end-users influenced impact in three areas: legislation and policy; practices and service delivery; and quality of life of community members. Engagement and impact were intertwined as research altered policy discourses and illuminated hidden social issues, preparing ground for subsequent, more direct impact. Likewise, academic and non-academic impacts were intertwined as research rigour and academic credibility were perceived to leverage influence. There was no evidence of achieving impact simply through the trickle-down effect of scholarly publication. The findings broaden understandings of how research influences policy and practice and iterative and indirect relationships between engagement and impact.
    • The AVA project : empowering young people to address domestic and sexual violence : final evaluation report

      Warrington, Camille; Thomas, Roma; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2016-09-01)
      The AVA Project: Empowering young people to address domestic and sexual violence (hereafter referred to as ‘the Project’) was developed and led by AVA, a UK charity committed to ending gender based violence and abuse. The overarching aim of the project was: “to deliver therapeutic group-work and leadership development to disadvantaged and marginalised young people to improve their understanding of domestic and sexual violence, to improve their emotional wellbeing and to empower them to influence peers and advocate for the needs of themselves and others within social care and education services”. The project defined itself as underpinned by a number of key values including: youth work (specifically the principle of voluntary engagement); participation; and feminist practice. It was funded for £298,254 over three years by Big Lottery: Reaching Communities Fund, commencing in April 2013 and, with a short project extension continued until July 2016. The project was delivered in five local sites (localities) across England, through two distinct though related models: MODEL 1: ‘Peer Education’ - a therapeutic group-work model across two project sites focused on improving emotional wellbeing and awareness of domestic and sexual violence (DSV). MODEL 2: ‘Youth leadership’ - a youth leadership project to improve young people’s emotional wellbeing, their understanding of domestic and sexual violence (DSV) and that of their peers, whilst increasing opportunities for, and the abilities of, young people to influence services aimed at them in relation to DSV.
    • Barnardo’s ReachOut: final evaluation report March 2019

      McNeish, Di; Scott, Sara; Lloyd, Sarah; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire; DMSS Research (University of Bedfordshire, 2019-03-01)
      ReachOut is a preventative child sexual exploitation (CSE) project established in 2016 under a partnership funding agreement between Barnardo’s, the KPMG Foundation, Department for Education, Communities and Local Government and Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council (RMBC). An independent evaluation was commissioned from the University of Bedfordshire with DMSS Research both to evaluate the impact of the project and to provide ongoing learning and feedback. A diverse staff team was recruited from a range of professional backgrounds including criminal justice, social work and youth work. There have been three main strands of work undertaken by ReachOut in order to achieve its aims: •Outreach work to raise awareness and provide support to children and young people in their communities  •Healthy relationship education in schools and other settings •Direct support for children and young people identified as at risk of CSE. These have operated at three levels of prevention: universal, including outreach at community events across Rotherham, helping to convey the message  that CSE is relevant to everyone; primary prevention, including education work in schools reaching over 2000 children and young people; targeted prevention with groups and communities identified as potentially more vulnerable to CSE as well as direct work with around 300 individual children and young people. Over the course of the three years, evaluators have carried out interviews with ReachOut staff and managers and representatives from external agencies; observed sessions of delivery; interviewed samples of young people and parents; analysed feedback questionnaires from school students and staff; reviewed project monitoring and samples of case records.
    • The beam and shadow of the spotlight: visibility and invisibility in women’s experiences of domestic violence and abuse

      Neale, Jo; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2019-01-29)
      Although it has received greater policy attention in recent years, domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is a global problem that, at a national level, remains under-reported, under-prosecuted and under-convicted. The apparent ineffectiveness of policy approaches in reducing the incidence of DVA, or mitigating its social and economic costs, not least upon those directly experiencing DVA, forms the backcloth of this enquiry. The aim of the study presented in this thesis was to explore, from a feminist poststructuralist perspective, the processes by which heterosexual women enter, endure and leave abusive relationships. Using semi-structured narrative style interviews, I worked with fourteen women with a wide range of characteristics in terms of age, ethnicity, physicality, socio-economic status and the length of time elapsed since their experiences of abuse. Using Nicola Gavey’s (2005) concept of cultural scaffolding (the discourses and [hetero]normative practices that make it so difficult to identify a relationship as abusive), I examined the space between normalised heterosexual relationships and abuse and, in the process, provided a better understanding of women’s routes into DVA. I have shone a spotlight on the full range of perpetrators’ behaviours that entrap and oppress their female partners and have identified four key domains in which the tactics of the abuser work to: ensnare his victim; dismantle her previous identities; prevent her from leaving the relationship; and punish her for leaving. These include behaviours used to manipulate women’s social and support networks in order to prolong or sabotage their attempts to escape the abuse. From a feminist poststructuralist perspective, participants’ experiences of entering, enduring and leaving abusive relationships can be read as part of the wider cultural scaffolding of heteropatriarchy, which left them exposed to ensnarement and exploitation. Using Dark Triad (Paulhus 2002) as a model for conceptualising perpetrators’ manipulation of their ex-partners, their children, and professionals, I offer an alternative way of understanding men’s abuse of their female partners.
    • Being heard: promoting children and young people’s involvement in participatory research on sexual violence: findings from an international scoping review

      Bovarnick, Silvie; Peace, Delphine; Warrington, Camille; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (The International Centre: Researching child sexual exploitation, violence and trafficking, University of Bedfordshire, 2018-08-01)
      This report shares findings from an international scoping review conducted on the engagement of children and young people in participatory research on sexual violence. The report discusses a range of ethical and practical challenges of involving vulnerable children and young people in participatory research on sensitive issues and draws out key considerations for research practice.
    • 'Between two fires' : understanding vulnerabilities and the support needs of people from Albania, Viet Nam and Nigeria who have experienced human trafficking into the UK

      Hynes, Patricia; Burland, Patrick; Thurnham, Angela; Dew, Jenniffer; Gani-Yusuf, Lola; Lenja, Valbona; Tran, Hong Thi; Olatunde, Aye; Gaxha, Alketa; University of Bedfordshire; et al. (University of Bedfordshire and International Organization for Migration (IOM), 2019-08-01)
      Final report of a two-year research study into understanding the causes, dynamics and 'vulnerabilities' to human trafficking in three source countries - Albania, Viet Nam and Nigeria - plus the support needs of people from these countries who have experienced trafficking to the UK. The study was carried out as a partnership between the University of Bedfordshire and the International Organization for Migration (IOM). 
    • Beyond David and Solomon: Biblical models for Carolingian laymen

      Stone, Rachel; Patzold, Steffen; Bock, Florian; University of Bedfordshire; University of Tubingen (de Gruyter, 2016-10-01)
    • Beyond referrals: levers for addressing harmful sexual behaviour in schools: a self-assessment resource for schools

      Lloyd, Jenny; Walker, Joanne; Bradbury, Vanessa; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2019-12-31)
      The Beyond Referrals self-assessment toolkit is intended to support schools to identify and assess the factors that contribute to addressing HSB in schools. The Beyond Referrals project launched the toolkit in 2018, following research in schools. This new updated version includes new levers and guidance on carrying out the self-assessment. The toolkit is supported by online tutorials available on the Contextual Safeguarding Network.
    • Beyond referrals: levers for addressing harmful sexual behaviours between students at school in England

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Lloyd, Jenny; Walker, Joanne; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-18)
      From sexist comments and harassment through to contact offences, schools are locations where young people experience sexual abuse from peers. This paper reports findings of a multi-site study into levers for preventing peer-sexual abuse in educational settings in England. Data gathered through practice observations, case and policy reviews and focus groups with professionals and students were analysed through the lens of both a whole school approach and Contextual Safeguarding with a particular focus on gender to identify four levers of peer-sexual abuse prevention. This paper reports how these four levers interact to create social conditions which prevent, or reduce the risk of, peer-sexual abuse in schools. Opportunities for schools, regulators and child protective services to use these levers, and the methodologies employed to identify them, are also outlined, as well as implications for policy
    • Black young people and gang involvement in London

      Pitts, John; University of Bedfordshire (SAGE, 2020-04-06)
      Drawing upon research undertaken by the present author in East, North West and South London and the work of other UK social scientists, this article considers the evidence concerning the involvement of young people of African-Caribbean origin and Mixed Heritage in street gangs and gang crime in London (For the sake of brevity, I will simply refer to these young people as Black, not least because this is how they usually define themselves). It outlines the sometimes acrimonious debate about the relationship between race, crime and street gangs in the United Kingdom in the past three decades, concluding that while many of the claims made about this relationship may be exaggerated or simply untrue, the evidence for the over-representation of Black young people in street gangs in London is compelling. The article then turns to the changing social and economic predicament of some Black young people in the capital since the 1980s and its relationship with their involvement in gang crime. Finally, it considers the role of drugs business in the proliferation of the gang form and ‘gangsta’ culture and the involvement of growing numbers of younger Black people in County Lines drug dealing.
    • 'Bound from either side': The limits of power in Carolingian marriage disputes, 840-870

      Stone, Rachel; University of Bedfordshire (Wiley-Blackwell, 2007-10-10)
    • Calling time: addressing ageism and age discrimination in alcohol policy, practice and research

      Wadd, Sarah; Holley-Moore, George; Riaz, Amna; Jones, Rebecca; Drink Wise, Age Well; University of Bedfordshire; International Longevity Centre (Drink Wise, Age Well, 2017-12-04)
      This report reveals evidence of age discrimination in alcohol policy, practice and research.  The findings are based on a survey of professionals, interviews and focus groups with older adults with alcohol problems and a summative review of relevant policy and published literature.
    • Carolingian Domesticities

      Stone, Rachel; Bennett, Judith; Karras, Ruth Mazo; University of Bedfordshire; University of Southern California; University of Minnesota (Oxford University Press, 2013-01-01)
      Carolingian ideas of "home" and "family" encompassed a wide range of meanings from physical buildings to kin and free and unfree dependents. Kinship ties played a vital role, both socially and politically, and marriage practices reflected that; Carolingian reforms respected parents' strategies concerning their children's marriages. The Frankish economy was structured around nuclear households, from peasant tenancies to the huge estates presided over by noble men and women. Male and female activities in both production and consumption were partially, but not completely gender-specific. Dowries provided some economic independence for women, but female wealth often depended on contingent factors such as family size and the attitudes of male relatives. The ordered conjugal household was an important image in Carolingian moral thought, with married women holding a subordinate, but honored position. Frankish ideology focused more on elite women's role in the management of dependents and social networks than on purely "housewifely" activities.