• Evaluation of the National Female Genital Mutilation Centre

      Munro, Emily; Tinarwo, Moreblessing; Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care; University of Bedfordshire (Department for Education, 2020-11-05)
      The National Female Genital Mutilation Centre (NFGMC) aims to achieve a system change in the provision of services for children and families who are affected by Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and Harmful Practices (HPs), including breast ironing and flattening, and child abuse linked to faith or belief. The NFGMC project was funded as part of the Department for Education’s Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme to develop a system change in how local authorities respond to cases of FGM. The Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care undertook the Round 2 mixed methods evaluation.
    • Leeds Partners in Practice: reimagining child welfare services for the 21st century: final evaluation report

      Harris, Julie Philippa; Tinarwo, Moreblessing; Ramanathan, Ramakrishnan; University of Bedfordshire (Department for Education, 2020-04-30)
      Leeds introduced restorative practice in Round 1 of the Department for Education’s (DfE) Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme through ‘Family Valued’ (March 2015 to December 2016): a workforce development programme amongst children’s services, partners and Family Group Conferencing (FGC) as an approach to working with families through FGC. Restorative practice recognises the strengths and resources that families have available to them. It aims to engage individuals as active participants in identifying problems and finding solutions. In so doing, it underlines the importance of doing ‘with’ families rather than ‘for’ or ‘to’, thus achieving greater collaboration between families and services towards common goals. In 2010, a city-wide locality model introduced 25 geographical ‘clusters’ based on the ‘Extended Schools’ service model. Cluster services provide parenting support and early help, and other targeted support services, alongside education. Children’s services were re-configured to align with these areas with the aim of improving multi-agency working and co-ordination. The Family Valued programme identified six clusters that collectively receive 50 per cent of referrals for children’s services in Leeds, indicating high levels of need and high demand for services. A seventh geographical area of high need and demand for services was identified and incorporated into the programme.
    • Scaling and deepening Reclaiming Social Work model

      Bostock, Lisa; Forrester, Donald; Patrizo, Louis; Godfrey, Tessa; Zonouzi, Maryam; Bird, Hayden; Antonopoulou, Vivi; Tinarwo, Moreblessing; University of Bedfordshire; University of Cardiff (Department for Education, 2017-07-06)
      This report evaluates the Scaling and Deepening the Reclaiming Social Work Model which aimed to embed ‘Reclaiming Social Work’ in 5 very different local authorities (Buckinghamshire, Derbyshire, Harrow, Hull and Southwark). Reclaiming Social Work (RSW) is a whole-system reform that aims to deliver systemic practice in children’s services. Key elements include in-depth training, small units with shared cases and group systemic case discussions, clinician support, reduced bureaucracy, devolved decision-making and enhanced administrative support. The overall aims include improving risk assessment and decision-making, providing more effective help and risk management for children and families. Keeping families together, where appropriate, is a fundamental aim of RSW. 
    • What do we know about transgender parenting?: findings from a systematic review

      Hafford-Letchfield, Trish; Cocker, Christine; Rutter, Deborah; Tinarwo, Moreblessing; McCormack, Keira; Manning, Rebecca; Middlesex University; University of East Anglia; University of Bedfordshire; Gender Essence & Essence Arts, Belfast; et al. (Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019-04-14)
      Transgender issues are under-explored and marginalised within mainstream social work and social care professional practice. The experience of gender transition has a profound impact on the individuals who have diverse gender identities and their family members. We present findings from a systematic review of studies concerning the experiences of transgender parenting conducted during January–September 2017. We took a life course approach, examining the research studies that investigated the experience of people identifying as transgender, who were already parents at the time of their transition or who wished to be parents following transition. The review evaluated existing findings from empirical research on transgender parenting and grandparenting to establish how trans people negotiate their relationships with children following transition, and sought to consider the implications for professional practice with trans people in relation to how best to support them with their family caring roles. We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method. Empirical studies published from 1 January 1990 to 31 April 2017 in the English language, and which had transgender parenting as a significant focus, were included in the review. Twenty-six studies met the criteria. Key themes reported are: how trans people negotiate their relationships with children following disclosure and transition; the impact of parental transitioning on children; relationships with wider families; trans people's desires to be parents; and the role of professional practice to support trans families. We discuss how the material from the review can inform social work education and practice, including to help identify future research, education and practice priorities in this area.