• Blowing the lid off cultural exclusion: constraints to participation in intergenerational celebrations

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2018-07-12)
      Families with children gather together multiple generations around carefully constructed bonfires, an exaggerated check for hedgehogs and nanny lights the fire. Dad lights the fireworks, carefully placing each one, sealing the tin, standing back after lighting the touch paper and together they watch the fizzy colourful exciting bursts. Stopping to enjoy baked potatoes, parkin, treacle toffee, and run around with sparklers. The fun fills the crisp night air. The noise, like an artillery barrage fills the smoky night. But not everyone has children to hand to gain access to this special night, and for many it is a night when other people have fun. They put up with the loud intrusive bangs, and reminisce on their own lifetime of being part of, and excluded from, this special night. Stories about leisure through the life course that are presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about bonfire night (Bonfire Night 2015). Current and remembered stories are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate ‘other people’s fun’ and the effect that echoes of the past have on the 5th of November each year. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind, 2006) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone, 2011; Smith, 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley, 2008). Drawing on narratives from the Mass Observation Archive in Sussex, this paper explores the thoughts and feeling of people around this mass cultural event who do not fit the cultural brief for inclusion. Some find ways to vicariously participate, others turn up the TV, grit their teeth and hang onto their pets. This research begins to explore what lies beneath these responses.
    • Blowing the lid off cultural exclusion: possibilities of the Mass Observation Project

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2018-03-27)
      Families with children gather together multiple generations around carefully constructed bonfires, an exaggerated check for hedgehogs and nanny lights the fire. Dad lights the fireworks, carefully placing each one, sealing the tin, standing back after lighting the touch paper and together they watch the fizzy colourful exciting bursts. Stopping to enjoy baked potatoes, parkin, treacle toffee, and run around with sparklers. The fun fills the crisp night air. The noise, like an artillery barrage fills the smoky night. But not everyone has children to hand to gain access to this special night, and for many it is a night when other people have fun. They put up with the loud intrusive bangs, and reminisce on their own lifetime of being part of, and excluded from, this special night. Stories about leisure through the life course that are presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about bonfire night (Bonfire Night 2015). Current and remembered stories are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate ‘other people’s fun’ and the effect that echoes of the past have on the 5th of November each year. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form which is used in leisure studies research, and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way. Drawing on narratives from the Mass Observation Archive in Sussex, this paper explores the thoughts and feeling of people around this mass cultural event who do not fit the cultural brief for inclusion. Some find ways to vicariously participate, others turn up the TV, grit their teeth and hang onto their pets. This research begins to explore what lies beneath these responses.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life

      Wiseman, T.; Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew (2018-07-19)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The narratives about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind 2012) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone 2011, Smith 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley 2008). The rich and insightful reports from the correspondents of the mass observation archive record in great detail the lives that people are living, and how they feel about them. There is not currently a grand narrative to lead us in this uncharted extended later life. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories, not based on historical generalisations, but on the carefully reported everyday lives of people that know.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life: early findings

      Wiseman, T.; Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew (2017-07-05)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The narratives about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind 2012) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone 2011, Smith 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley 2008). The rich and insightful reports from the correspondents of the mass observation archive record in great detail the lives that people are living, and how they feel about them. There is not currently a grand narrative to lead us in this uncharted extended later life. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories, not based on historical generalisations, but on the carefully reported everyday lives of people that know.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life: working with the Mass Observation Project

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2017-07-11)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The stories about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form which is used in leisure studies research and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way. Finding a comfortable lifestyle is an art, and taking the lead from those that have gone before is not possible for this ‘new’ cohort. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase of life. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories.
    • ‘Whose land is it anyway?’ deconstructing the nature of property rights and their regulation

      Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew; Parker, G. (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012-10-18)
      Contemporary Western legal theory is posited on a claim that property rights have ‘evolved’ as a response to competition over the use of land and that the distribution and regulation of ownership rights reflect society. Other branches of the social sciences regard regulation and rights distributions as being produced by a more complex and shifting interplay of governmentalities. The governance of land has therefore produced emergent hybrid sets of arrangements that reflect various sources and types of power circulating through social institutions and the wider political economy. Garrett Hardin’s ‘tragedy of the commons’ has been highly influential, in arguing that external or private regulation of land use is all that prevents over-exploitation of common property resources. Many critics have sought to expose weaknesses in Hardin’s arguments, and Hardin himself later limited his thesis to explaining the fate of unmanaged commons. Yet his central thesis, about the deployment of property rights, has largely remained unchallenged. As E.P. Thompson has argued, this has (erroneously, in his belief) included a central notion that land is not only capable of being ‘owned’, but that ownership is discrete, hierarchical and, ultimately, ‘natural’. In agreeing with Thompson, Munton has recently observed that the dynamism of contemporary land use and the interests shaping its regulation increasingly renders obsolete singular ideas of tenure in favour of understanding property as a ‘bundle of rights’ that can be allocated differentially as required. In building upon Thompson and Munton’s arguments, we seek to challenge Hardin’s thesis, by arguing that: (a) far from being natural, property rights are human directed inscriptions on land; (b) the institution of property has a natural (or preferred) form, to the extent that it is allowed to emerge and evolve by common convention; (c) contrary to advanced liberal doctrine, land has a tendency towards common, rather than individual, regulation and use; and (d) liberal theory has been used to justify and shift regulation from the common to the individual. In advancing our arguments, we have borrowed ideas from Marcel Mauss’ description of the socio-economic gift relationship, in which he posits the root of social power being contained in the value of the gift made from one person to another and the indebtedness of the other until the gift is reciprocated with interest. Since reciprocation demands further reciprocation, Mauss shows that only the most powerful can survive a process that, ultimately, serves to underpin the hegemony of tying social practice to the dominant ideology of exchange.