• Applying thresholds to extra-familial harm: learning from Hackney’s Child Wellbeing Framework

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Owens, Rachael; Peace, Delphine; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2019-10-31)
      The Hackney Child Wellbeing Framework provides a framework for Hackney’s Children and Families Service, partner services and agencies to determine the right intervention for a child and a family, including which services should respond and what is required for a statutory intervention. The document proposes three levels of intervention: Universal: a response by universal services, often working individually. Within an extra-familial scenario, this also includes ensuring safety for young people within universally available leisure and recreational provision. Universal Plus/Universal Partnership Plus: a response by universal services working together in universal settings and sometimes bringing additional targeted resources into a multi-agency partnership plan to both assess and address concerns. Complex and/or High Risk: a response that requires multi-agency and/or specialist services, often governed by statutory frameworks, to take the lead role. The document considers these levels of interventions in relations to different domains including children’s health, emotional health, wellbeing and behaviour; education; neighbourhood; family and parenting.
    • Being heard: promoting children and young people’s involvement in participatory research on sexual violence: findings from an international scoping review

      Bovarnick, Silvie; Peace, Delphine; Warrington, Camille; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (The International Centre: Researching child sexual exploitation, violence and trafficking, University of Bedfordshire, 2018-08-01)
      This report shares findings from an international scoping review conducted on the engagement of children and young people in participatory research on sexual violence. The report discusses a range of ethical and practical challenges of involving vulnerable children and young people in participatory research on sensitive issues and draws out key considerations for research practice.
    • Holistic approaches to safeguarding adolescents

      Peace, Delphine; Atkinson, Ruth; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bdfordshire, 2019-02-28)
      This briefing shares findings from the Contextual Safeguarding Network’s third learning project exploring how local areas are developing holistic approaches to safeguarding adolescents from extra-familial risk. Holistic approaches are understood as coordinated strategic approaches that move beyond siloed responses to specific risks, such as child sexual exploitation (CSE), youth violence, criminal exploitation or teenage relationship abuse and develop overarching responses by joining meeting structures, assessments and interventions. The Contextual Safeguarding toolkit, which will be published on the Contextual Safeguarding Network in March 2019, will provide more exemplars of holistic approaches to safeguarding adolescents, including multi-agency extra-familial risk meeting protocols and templates. I
    • Introduction to the study exploring peer support initiatives for young people who have experienced sexual violence: research findings: briefing paper one

      Cody, Claire; Bovarnick, Silvie; Peace, Delphine; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2020-04-30)
      The key questions explored in this study into ‘peer support’3 were: What do peer support initiatives for young people (aged 10-24) who have experienced sexual violence look like and involve? How are peer support initiatives experienced and received by the young people and professionals involved? What is the value of peer support initiatives for those involved? What are the challenges and barriers linked to these forms of support? A number of activities were undertaken as part of this study. This included: Undertaking a literature review to identify relevant evidence and key themes to explore further in the study. Circulating a ‘call for evidence’ for information about, and materials related to, peer support initiatives for young people who had experienced sexual violence. Developing an online survey to enable individuals to share their experiences of peer support initiatives. Undertaking interviews with key informants. The call for evidence and survey resulted in limited responses and therefore the research team, through contacts and online searches, identified and proactively contacted 18 organisations and initiatives providing peer support for young people affected by sexual violence. Representatives from 12 of these organisations and initiatives responded and agreed to take part in the study. Following this, semi-structured individual or group interviews were undertaken online or face-to-face with a total of 25 key informants from these 12 organisations and initiatives.
    • Peer support for young people who have experienced sexual violence - tensions, challenges and strategies: briefing paper four

      Cody, Claire; Bovarnick, Silvie; Peace, Delphine; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2020-04-30)
      This briefing is based on exploratory research into ‘peer support’ for young people who have experienced sexual violence . For the purposes of this briefing, ‘peer support’ is defined as a formalised supportive relationship between individuals who have lived experience of sexual violence in common. This briefing paper explores the perspectives of those designing peer support initiatives together with those in peer supporter roles for young people affected by sexual violence . This paper focusses on one area of the findings – the risks, tensions and challenges associated with peer support interventions. It explores four different themes: The target group involved in peer support interventions; Organisational systems, processes and culture; Recruitment of peer supporters and; Challenges experienced by peer supporters when in the job. For each theme tensions, challenges and potential strategies are outlined.
    • Peer support for young people who have experienced sexual violence - the value: research findings: briefing paper three

      Cody, Claire; Bovarnick, Silvie; Peace, Delphine; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2020-04-30)
      This briefing is based on exploratory research into ‘peer support’ for young people who have experienced sexual violence. For the purposes of this briefing, ‘peer support’ is defined as a formalised supportive relationship between individuals who have lived experience of sexual violence in common3 . This briefing paper explores the perspectives of those designing peer support initiatives together with those in peer supporter roles for young people affected by sexual violence. This paper focusses on one area of the findings related to the perceived value for those: receiving peer based support; giving support and; organisations supporting such initiatives. The paper also reflects on the implications of this for practice and future research.
    • Peer support for young people who have experienced sexual violence? the rationale and key themes from the literature: briefing paper two

      Cody, Claire; Peace, Delphine; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2020-04-30)
      This briefing is based on a review of the literature that was carried out in preparation for a scoping study that aimed to learn lessons from those engaged in peer support interventions for young people who had experienced sexual violence. This briefing paper: Provides a rationale outlining why there may be value in peer support interventions for young people who have experienced sexual violence. Considers the spectrum of activities that have elements of peer based work. Outlines key themes from the limited existing research on peer support for those impacted by sexual violence. Outlines relevant themes arising in the broader literature on peer support.
    • Responding to safeguarding concerns in local businesses and neighbourhoods

      Peace, Delphine; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2018-09-30)
      The purpose of this Learning Project is to understand how areas are seeking to address risks within neighbourhood and community settings and engaging businesses in this process.
    • University network: children challenging sexual violence: first briefing paper

      Peace, Delphine; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2019-05-31)
      This university network supports the promotion of activities undertaken by universities around the world to challenge sexual violence against children, including curriculum development and delivery and research activities. It aims to connect those working in universities on such activities to share learning, to enhance collaboration and to raise the profile of the work. This is important as it is often through universities that knowledge is generated and validated and where the teaching of the next generation of practitioners occurs. While we are keen for the network to focus on supporting and encouraging those working within universities to challenge sexual violence against children, we appreciate that this can often be seen as a narrow field and that such work can take place only through ‘one off’ temporary grants or initiatives rather than a committed long term strategy. Much of the work developed is undertaken in partnership with international and national non-governmental organisations (INGOs/NGOs) and so we are keen to include this work where possible within the university network. We also appreciate that sexual violence is often addressed within generic approaches to violence against children. For these reasons we aims to include those working in universities challenging sexual violence against children or other forms of abuse. As the work develops and is further disseminated, we are keen to further prioritise activities focusing solely on sexual violence against children. In the longer term, we want to focus on university led strategic initiatives engaging participatory approaches with children and young people to prevent and respond to sexual violence against children. In particular the network is aiming to encourage university engagement with participatory approaches that enable and support children to be co-determiners of research agendas, activities, and teaching and curriculum materials. The university network is an initiative developed as part of the Our Voices programme of work coordinated by the ‘International Centre: Researching child sexual exploitation, violence and trafficking’ at the University of Bedfordshire in the UK (hereafter referred to as ‘the International Centre’) with current support from the Oak Foundation and Tides Foundation. The Our Voices programme promotes the involvement of children and young people affected by sexual violence in research, policy and practice. See more on https://www.our-voices.org.uk This briefing paper covers activities arising from the very early stages of the development of this network (from March to May 2019). It hopes to encourage others to contact us, engage with the work and be part of thinking about all further activities.
    • University network: children challenging sexual violence: second briefing paper

      Maternowska, Catherine; Peace, Delphine; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2019-09-30)
      The ‘International University Network: Children Challenging Sexual Violence’ is a new initiative to capture and promote participatory activities undertaken by universities around the world to challenge sexual violence against children (SVAC). The network, led by ‘The International Centre: Researching child sexual exploitation, violence and trafficking’ at the University of Bedfordshire (hereafter referred to as ‘the International Centre’), and supported by Oak Foundation and Tides Foundation, is part of the Our Voices programme of work. As part of the Our Voices programme of work, we are particularly interested in participatory approaches involving people collaboratively in university activities: this can include engaging them in developing curriculum or teaching activities or in designing and conducting research. Following the launch of the network in May 2019, we published a briefing paper sharing initial findings from a survey we designed to map out academics and institutions working in this field (from March to May 2019). This first briefing is available here. In July 2019 we held our first webinar in which we outlined our vision for the network and shared further survey and interview findings from our initial scoping with experts working in this field. The webinar was held in collaboration with ‘The End Violence Against Children Global Partnership’ and potential overlapping activities and objectives between these two international networks were identified. The second half of the webinar consisted of a Q&A and discussion session where participants shared ideas for future developments. This second briefing provides a recap of our first webinar.