• Complexity and challenge: a triennial analysis of SCRs 2014-2017

      Brandon, Marian; Sidebotham, Peter; Belderson, Pippa; Cleaver, Hedy; Dickens, Jonathan; Garstang, Joanna; Harris, Julie Philippa; Sorensen, Penny; Wate, Russell; University of East Anglia; et al. (Department for Education, 2020-03-04)
      This is a triennial review of a total of 368 Serious Case Reviews (SCRs) from the period 1 April 2014 - 31 March 2017. A serious case review (SCR) is carried out by a Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) where abuse or neglect of a child is known or suspected and either a child has died, or has been seriously harmed and there is cause for concern as to the way in which the authority, their Board partners or other relevant persons have worked together to safeguard the child. The study’s primary aim was to understand the key issues, themes and challenges from the cases examined and to draw out implications for both policy makers and practitioners.
    • Evaluation of the Alexi Project ‘Hub and Spoke’ programme of CSE service development. Final report.

      Harris, Julie Philippa; Roker, Debi; Shuker, Lucie; Brodie, Isabelle; D'Arcy, Kate; Dhaliwal, Sukhwant; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2017-11-01)
      This report details the evaluation of a programme of service development as it was rolled out through 16 new services, which were designed to extend the coverage and reach of child sexual exploitation (CSE) services in England. They were funded by the Child Sexual Exploitation Funders’ Alliance (CSEFA). The 16 services were all established by voluntary sector organisations, and specialised in working with young people affected by CSE. Each service adopted a ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of service development, which involved an established voluntary sector CSE service (known as the ‘hub’), locating experienced project workers (known as ‘spokes’) in new service delivery areas. These spoke workers undertook a range of activities to improve CSE work locally, including individual casework and awareness-raising with children and young people, and consultancy, training and awareness-raising with professionals locally. The evaluation adopted a realist approach. This focusses not just on whether programmes or interventions work, but on how or why they might do so (Pawson and Tilley, 1997 ). It takes a theory-driven approach to evaluation rather than concentrating on particular types of evidence or focussing on ‘before’ and ‘after’ type data. It starts from the principle that interventions in themselves do not either ‘work’ or ‘not work’ – rather it is the people involved in them and the skills, attitudes, knowledge and approach they bring, together with the influence of context and resources, that determine the outcomes generated. The evaluation was undertaken between September 2013 and January 2017, exploring how the 16 services developed during a phased roll out. The evaluation team undertook extensive fieldwork at each site on two occasions (one visit for the final eight sites), including 276 interviews with Hub and Spoke staff, professionals locally from children’s services, police, and health, and with children and young people and parents/carers. In addition, quantitative data were collected (about numbers of young people and professionals reached), and spoke workers produced case studies about their work with young people.
    • Evaluation of the Alexi Project ‘Hub and Spoke’ programme of CSE service development: key messages

      Harris, Julie Philippa; Roker, Debi; Shuker, Lucie; Brodie, Isabelle; D’Arcy, Kate; Dhaliwal, Sukhwant; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2017-11-30)
      The Alexi Hub and Spoke programme was an £8m service development programme, funded by the Child Sexual Exploitation Funders’ Alliance (CSEFA). It was designed to rapidly increase the capacity and coverage of specialist, voluntary sector child sexual exploitation (CSE) services within England. Sixteen CSE services were funded for three years each,1 over a five year period,2 with the aims of: 1. Making specialist support available to children and young people in a series of new locations. 2. Improving the co-ordination, delivery and practice of local services responding to CSE – including the police, children’s services and other partner agencies. The model known as ‘Hub and Spoke’ was used to achieve this, whereby a voluntary sector organisation (the ‘hub’) placed experienced CSE workers (‘spokes’) either within its own or into new neighbouring local authority areas, in order to extend its coverage and reach. These spoke workers undertook a variety of activities, including individual casework with children and young people, consultancy, and training and awareness-raising with children and young people and practitioners. In total, 53 spoke workers were placed out in 35 new local authority areas and supported by the 16 hub services.
    • Leeds Partners in Practice: reimagining child welfare services for the 21st century: final evaluation report

      Harris, Julie Philippa; Tinarwo, Moreblessing; Ramanathan, Ramakrishnan; University of Bedfordshire (Department for Education, 2020-04-30)
      Leeds introduced restorative practice in Round 1 of the Department for Education’s (DfE) Children’s Social Care Innovation Programme through ‘Family Valued’ (March 2015 to December 2016): a workforce development programme amongst children’s services, partners and Family Group Conferencing (FGC) as an approach to working with families through FGC. Restorative practice recognises the strengths and resources that families have available to them. It aims to engage individuals as active participants in identifying problems and finding solutions. In so doing, it underlines the importance of doing ‘with’ families rather than ‘for’ or ‘to’, thus achieving greater collaboration between families and services towards common goals. In 2010, a city-wide locality model introduced 25 geographical ‘clusters’ based on the ‘Extended Schools’ service model. Cluster services provide parenting support and early help, and other targeted support services, alongside education. Children’s services were re-configured to align with these areas with the aim of improving multi-agency working and co-ordination. The Family Valued programme identified six clusters that collectively receive 50 per cent of referrals for children’s services in Leeds, indicating high levels of need and high demand for services. A seventh geographical area of high need and demand for services was identified and incorporated into the programme.
    • The participation of young people in child sexual exploitation services: a scoping review of the literature

      Brodie, Isabelle; D'Arcy, Kate; Harris, Julie Philippa; Roker, Debi; Shuker, Lucie; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire, 2016-01-10)
      This is a scoping review of the literature which focuses on the participation of young people in child sexual exploitation services.  The review is part of the Alexi Project, which involves an evaluation of the CSEFA Hub and Spoke services in England. The review aims to develop understanding of the concept of participation and the nature of effective participatory practice in the context of child sexual exploitation services. It has taken place between September 2015 and April 2016. The review focuses on the following questions: • How is ‘participation’ of young people in CSE services conceptualised in the research, policy and professional literature? • How explicit is the policy requirement for children and young people’s participation in the processes associated with assessment, planning and review and what evidence exists regarding the implementation and/or effectiveness of these processes? • What evidence exists regarding the nature of the experience of participation, and its impact, from the perspectives of young people, parents and carers, and professionals? • What evidence exists regarding the conditions that need to be in place to make participative working possible and effective for different groups of CSE affected young people? • What evidence exists regarding the replicability of participative models?
    • The role of the voluntary sector in protecting children from sexual exploitation: evidence briefing

      Shuker, Lucie; Harris, Julie Philippa; University of Bedfordshire (British Association of Social Workers, 2018-01-31)
      This briefing summarises the findings of a three-year evaluation of the ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of CSE service development. It highlights evidence on the role of the voluntary sector in responding to CSE within the 50 local authorities where these services operated.
    • SEFA Hub and Spoke Evaluation - year two progress report and interim findings 2014-15

      Harris, Julie Philippa; Roker, Debi; D’Arcy, Kate; Shuker, Lucie; Brodie, Isabelle; Pearce, Jenny J.; University of Bedfordshire (University of Bedfordshire/Bromley Trust, 2015-12-01)
      This report details findings from the second year of a four-year evaluation of the ‘Hub and Spoke’ initiative, being undertaken by the University of Bedfordshire. Funded by the Child Sexual Exploitation Funders’ Alliance (CSEFA), this initiative aims to improve services in relation to child sexual exploitation (CSE). It utilises the expertise, resources and infrastructure of an established voluntary sector CSE service (the ‘Hub’) by locating experienced CSE workers (known as ‘Spoke workers’) into new service delivery areas. The evaluation assesses the extent to which the Hub and Spoke model triggers cultural and systemic change in the way that services engaging with young people respond to CSE.