• Intellectual and developmental disabilities, spirituality and religion: a systematic review 1990–2015

      Sango, Precious Nonye; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Kent (Taylor & Francis, 2017-06-23)
      Over the past two decades, research on religion and spirituality has begun to gain momentum. Nevertheless, to the authors’ knowledge, a systematic review of empirical research in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), social care services, and spirituality has not been carried out in the last 20 years. Six psychology-, IDD-, religion-, and health-related journals were searched in addition to two databases. Empirical articles published between 1990 and 2015 on religion, religiosity, spirituality, spiritual or religious care and people with IDD and related terms were identified and examined. Of the 57 publications identified, only 8.9% met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The five empirical articles included in this review were thematically analyzed, yielding four main themes in relation to spiritual or religious care: understanding of spiritual or religious concepts, support to participate in spiritual or religious activities, spiritual or religious practices in relation to self-identity, and barriers to spiritual or religious care provision. The authors conclude that more empirical and original research in relation to the spiritual care of people with IDD residing in IDD care services is needed.
    • Spiritual care for people with intellectual and developmental disability: an exploratory study

      Sango, Precious Nonye; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Kent (Taylor & Francis, 2017-07-27)
      Background: A faith-based (pseudonym, Adam’s House – AH) and a non-faith-based care service (pseudonym, Greenleaves – GL) were explored to find out if and how spiritual support was provided for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). Method: Six months were spent volunteering within each service and a mixed-methods approach was utilised including applied and ethnographic methods to explore and describe if and how spirituality was embedded within the two services. Results: Themes found included community of value; homely functional care; and barriers to spiritual care. GL staff tended to provide what we termed “religious spiritual care” while AH staff administered both “religious” and “non-religious” spiritual-based support. This difference may be related to the type of training found only at AH which included spiritual dimensions. Conclusion: Services could benefit from acknowledging the importance and significance of spiritual care training and education for effective and varied spiritual care for people with IDD who desire such support.
    • Spirituality and learning disability: a review of UK government guidance

      Sango, Precious Nonye; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; ; University of Kent (Emerald, 2014-09-30)
      Purpose Despite spirituality being a key aspect of quality of life, it appears to remain a low-priority area for social and health care government policy. The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe what, if at all, UK policy says about spirituality in relation to the care of people with learning disabilities (LD). Design/methodology/approach A systematic policy review using three government databases: legislation.gov.uk; Department of Health and Directgov (now known as gov.uk) was carried out. Findings The review identified policy gaps and a general lack of government directives in relation to the spiritual care of people with LD. Whilst research in this area is gathering momentum, practical implementation which makes a real difference to the spiritual experiences of people with LD appears to be sparse. Originality/value To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first systematic policy review on this subject area, highlighting the need for spirituality to become a more supported aspect of social care within LD services.
    • Spirituality and social networks of people with intellectual and developmental disability

      Sango, Precious Nonye; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Kent (Routledge, 2019-08-20)
      Background: Researchers contend that religious and spiritual communities may provide a conduit to friendship for people with IDD. This research explored the interface between social networks and spirituality for individuals with IDD living in either a faith or non-faith based service. Method: A mixed-methods approach was used including semi-structured interviews, the Social Network Guide and the Spiritual Belief Inventory-15R with individuals with IDD (or staff members who provided their opinions of what individuals who lacked capacity to consent would say if they had capacity). These findings were corroborated with extensive field notes generated from participant observation. Results: The faith-based group had a higher network size (m = 78) compared to the non-faith based group (m = 44). Those with larger social networks also reported higher SBI-15R scores. Conclusion: Findings highlight the possible role of social, religious and spiritual activities for expanding individuals’ social networks.
    • Spirituality and social networks of people with intellectual and developmental disability

      Sango, Precious Nonye; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; ; Canterbury Christ Church University; University of Kent (Taylor and Francis, 2017-05-24)
      Background: Researchers contend that religious and spiritual communities may provide a conduit to friendship for people with IDD. This research explored the interface between social networks and spirituality for individuals with IDD living in either a faith or non-faith based service. Method: A mixed-methods approach was used including semi-structured interviews, the Social Network Guide and the Spiritual Belief Inventory-15R with individuals with IDD (or staff members who provided their opinions of what individuals who lacked capacity to consent would say if they had capacity). These findings were corroborated with extensive field notes generated from participant observation. Results: The faith-based group had a higher network size (m = 78) compared to the non-faith based group (m = 44). Those with larger social networks also reported higher SBI-15R scores. Conclusion: Findings highlight the possible role of social, religious and spiritual activities for expanding individuals’ social networks.
    • Spirituality and the quality of life of individuals with intellectual disability

      Sango, Precious Nonye; Forrester-Jones, Rachel; ; University of Bedfordshire; Western University (LSE Press, 2022-08-30)
      Context: Spirituality seems to form part of person-centred care planning and needs assessment of persons with intellectual disability. Yet, the role of spiritually in relation to their quality of life (QoL) has scarcely been investigated. Objective: This paper reports on an exploration of the extent to which spiritual belief and practice was linked to individuals’ perception of quality of life in two types of care services – one a faith-based provider, the other a non-faith based service. Method: A mixed-methods approach utilising the Quality Of Life Questionnaire (QOLQ) and the a brief spiritual beliefs inventory for use in quality of life research (Systems of Belief Inventory -15R) was used to interview people with intellectual disabilities (or, if they lacked capacity, their formal carers) who lived in their respective service for a long time. Findings: Participants living in the faith-based care service recorded higher mean and median scores on the QOLQ compared to their colleagues who resided in the non-faith based care service. Further analysis indicated significant correlations between the spirituality measure and most of the QOLQ domains. Limitations: The study sample of 36 makes generalisations difficult and our initial intention to include a range of faith traditions were unsuccessful. Implications: Further academic studies exploring spiritual issues for people with intellectual disabilities are needed, as well as clearer policy and practice guidelines and a willingness on the part of services to support this aspect of life.