• Diaspora and nation: displacement and the politics of Kashmiri identity in Britain

      Ali, Nasreen (Taylor & Francis, 2003-01-01)
      The idea of the nation-state continues to dominate the way in which political collective identities are conceptualised in South Asia. One of the challenges the nation-state faces is the situation in which large sections of its population are located outside state boundaries. This paper reflects on the way in which the displacement of peoples can lead to the displacement of a conventional understanding of the nation-state as combining the idea of one government, one land and one people. It explores the impact of displacement, both empirically and conceptually, on the notions of collective identity, illustrating the argument by reference to the Kashmiri narratives of identity being articulated in Britain.
    • Distinct identities: South Asian youth in Britain

      Ali, Nasreen; Northover, M. (International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1999-01-01)
    • Improving responses to the sexual abuse of Black, Asian and minority ethnic children

      Ali, Nasreen; Butt, Jabeer; Phillips, Melanie; Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual Abuse; University of Bedfordshire; Race Equality Foundation (Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual Abuse, 2021-03-31)
      This research study was commissioned by the Centre of expertise on child sexual abuse (CSA Centre) to address knowledge gaps around professional practice in supporting children from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds who are at risk of, or experiencing, child sexual abuse (CSA).
    • Kashmiri nationalism beyond the nation state

      Ali, Nasreen (SAGE, 2002-01-01)
      Fifty years on the Kashmir conflict rumbles on. The various parties to the dispute engage in highly polemical exchanges in a variety of media, artillery shells cross the line of control and the region remains a potential nuclear flashpaint. Given the geopolitical aspects of the conflict, it is not surprising that the Kashmiri dispute continues to be studied primarily in terms of relations between India and Pakistan, or as a threat to regional stability. At the heart of the Kashmir conflict is the issue of identity, and the rival claims of India, Pakistan and Kashmiris all depend on what the exact nature of Kashmir (an intrinsic part of the Mahabharata, Muslim, indigenous or secular) is. The plethora of terms that designate the various political and territorial configurations in the dispute (Indian-occupied Kashmir, Pakistanioccupied Kashmir, Indian-administered Kashmir, Jammu and Kashmir, Azad Kashmir) point to the absence of even a rudimentary consensus about the identity of Kashmir and Kashmiris. While the study of the dispute has produced a copious literature in terms of international relations, there has been much less work done on the relationship between the articulation of a distinct Kashmiri identity and the existence of a large diasporic population. It is this relationship that I want to explore in this article. While I concede the salience of many other factors contributing to the Kashmiri dispute (the rival claims of Pakistan and India, and the role of the various armed forces in the region) my purpose is to examine the way a particular representation of Kashmir has become increasingly prominent, one that is not reducible to the machinations of the Pakistani or Indian governments or their clients. It is sometimes suggested that Kashmiris have failed to establish themselves as a nation and Kashmiri identity continues to be a rather fragile affair. This view that Kashmiris do not constitute a genuine distinct nationality was dominant until very recently, and to some extent is still dominant amongst Pakistanis and Indians. I suggest that this is only the case if we continue to see the formations of nations and ethnic identity through the prism of nineteenth-century notions of collective identity.’ In this article I want to show how developments in globalisation have produced a new matrix through which it is possible to configure Kashmiri identity as a diasporic form. I will do this in two ways. Using research from ethnographic work carried out in Luton, I will first show the way in which the contemporary articulation of Kashmiris-ness as a distinct ethnicity has been made possible by the settlement of Kashmiris outside historical ideas of what constituted Kashmir. I want to show that the creation of a Kashmiri identity is heavily dependant on the displacement and resettlement of Kashmiris outside of their imagined homeland. In other words, the discourse of Kashmiriyat emerges in a diasporic space. Second, I will show how this discourse recruits its subjects and projects its collective identity in a de-terntorialised diasporic context. In other words, this article has two major themes to it. The first theme examines the way Kashmiri identity is narrated and focuses on the variety of agents responsible for the construction of this Kashmiri-ness. The second theme examines the way in which a group of people (who constitute most of my respondents) express their Kashmiri-ness in both a global and local context.
    • Kashmiris: between ethnicity and nationality: will the ‘real’ Kashmiris please stand up?

      Ali, Nasreen (British Association for South Asian Studies, 2002-01-01)
    • Listening to grandparents from a range of ethnic communities: the methodological implications

      Schild, L.; Ali, Nasreen (British Society of Gerontology, 1997-01-01)
    • Postcolonial people: South Asians in Britain

      Ali, Nasreen; Kalra, V.S.; Sayyid, B. (Hurst & Company, 2006-01-01)
      The diversity and complexity of British Asian life is plain for all to see and has been celebrated in literature, poetry and film, not to mention performing arts and music. Till now, however, an accessibly written introductory volume on the South Asian presence has been absent from our bookshelves. A Postcolonial People is an innovative and intriguing blend of scholarship and reportage on the multi-faceted experience of British Asians covering everything from discrimination to bhangra, Bradford to chicken tikka, Asian Britsih cultural landscapes to arranged marriages. Eschewing both anthropological approaches and overtly theoretical analyses, the contributors map out the heterodox impact of British Asians on the United Kingdom, detailing their achievement and setbacks, points of intersection and divergence as a postcolonial people and everyday lives.