Recent Submissions

  • Evidence based approaches to violence reduction: a discussion paper

    Davey, Peter; Bath, Rachel; Staniforth, Rachel; Firmin, Carlene Emma; MacFarlane, Colin; Sebire, Jackie; Cestaro, David; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2021-03-30)
    This document helps practitioners to understand Public Health, Problem-solving and Contextual Safeguarding approaches as three complementary evidence-based approaches to violence reduction.
  • Towards a contextual response to peer-on-peer abuse: research and resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-20)
    This report chronicles the findings and resources on peer-on-peer abuse generated by the MsUnderstood Partnership over the past three years, with specific reference to the tools and knowledge created alongside professionals through local site work. The programme of work was funded by the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, the Samworth Foundation and Trust for London.
  • Young people who sexually harm peers in groups: a rapid evidence assessment of international literature

    Latchford, Lia; Firmin, Carlene Emma; Fritz, Danielle; Hackett, Simon; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-11-18)
    This literature review was conducted to develop an evidence base on young people who sexually harm in groups, by synthesising existing literature on group harmful sexual behaviour (HSB), wider group offending and group interventions
  • Safeguarding adolescents: a survey of London professionals

    Shuker, Lucie; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2017-11-16)
    This report presents the findings of a survey of 120 London-based professionals from a range of agencies, on their views and experiences of safeguarding adolescents in the capital. It was undertaken as part of a programme of work for the London Safeguarding Adolescents Steering Group (LSASG) and will inform the development of a new chapter on safeguarding adolescents in the London Child Protection Procedures.
  • Safeguarding during adolescence: the relationship between contextual safeguarding, complex safeguarding and transitional safeguarding

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Horan, Jayne; Holmes, Dez; Hopper, Gail; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-01-09)
    Briefing on the relationship between Contextual Safeguarding, Complex Safeguarding and Transitional Safeguarding
  • Contextual safeguarding: a 2020 update on the operational, strategic and conceptual framework

    Firmin, Carlene; Lloyd, Jenny; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2020-05-07)
    This briefing provides an overview of the design and use of the Contextual Safeguarding Framework from 2017 until 2020, and updates the first overview briefing published in 2017.
  • Harmful sexual behaviour in school: a briefing on the findings, implications and resources for schools and multi-agency partners

    Lloyd, Jenny; Walker, Joanne; Bradbury, Vanessa; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2020-06-24)
    A briefing that presents findings from a two-year study into harmful sexual behaviour (HSB) in English schools, Beyond Referrals Two. The briefing provides an overview of key thematic findings from the study, organised in relation to: the prevalence of HSB; strengths of responses; disclosure; peer support; parental engagement; and disability and provides 30 recommendations for schools, multi-agency safeguarding partners and the wider field of education.
  • Peer support interventions for safeguarding: a scoping review

    Brodie, Isabelle; Latimer, Katie; Firmin, Carlene Emma; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2020-09-22)
    This literature review presents five forms of peer (support) intervention, along with their key features, potential benefits and considerations for practice. This document summarises the research background to the review, and its methodology, before turning to the findings and conclusions. This review was conducted alongside a study with voluntary sector organisation Safer London, to consider the opportunities to develop safeguarding interventions based on peer support.
  • Developing holistic and coordinated strategic approaches to peer-on-peer abuse: extract #5

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-07)
    In this extract from the report 'Towards a Contextual Response to Peer-on-Peer Abuse: Research and Resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016', researchers discuss how they helped local sites improve the coordination in their response to safeguarding adolescents in general and peer-on-peer abuse specifically.
  • Engagement of community, specialist and voluntary organisations: extract #4

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-17)
    This extract from the report 'Towards a Contextual Response to Peer-on-Peer Abuse: Research and Resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016' highlights researchers' work with community, voluntary and specialist organisations in the response to peer-on-peer abuse. The extract discusses a train-the-trainer programme, a study on detached youth work provision and building awareness and partnerships amongst community sector provision.
  • Responses to young people who abuse their peers: extract #3

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-19)
    In this extract from the report 'Towards a Contextual Response to Peer-on-Peer Abuse: Research and Resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016', researchers explain their work in two sites to enhance local responses to harmful sexual behaviour.
  • Working with schools and alternative education providers: extract #2

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-20)
    This extract from the report 'Towards a Contextual Response to Peer-on-Peer Abuse: Research and Resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016' highlights the role that education providers may play in responding to peer-on-peer abuse. The extract discusses the potential for working with Fair Access Panels and opportunities for creating whole school approaches to respond to peer-on-peer abuse. If you would like a copy of the slides or editable copies of the resources within this extract, then Contact Us.
  • Assessment and intervention planning for young people at risk of extra-familial harm: a practice guide

    Owens, Rachael; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2019-03-07)
    This document is designed to support practitioners to undertake assessments which are holistic in nature – taking into account both the context of children’s experiences within their family home and in other social spaces.
  • Life in a lanyard: developing an ethics of embedded research methods in children’s social care

    Lloyd, Jenny; University of Bedfordshire (Emerald, 2021-07-05)
    Purpose: To consider the opportunities for embedded methodologies for research into children’s social care and the ethics of this method. Design: The study draws upon embedded research from a two year study into developing children’s social work approaches to extra-familial risk. Findings draw upon personal reflections from field notes, case reviews, practice observations and reflections. Findings: Two findings are presented. Firstly, that Embedded Research provides numerous opportunities to develop child protection systems and practice. Secondly, a number of ethical questions and challenges of the methodology are presented. Limitations: the article draws upon personal reflections from one study and is not intended to be representative of all approaches to embedded research methods. Practical implications: Two practical recommendations are presented. Firstly I outline a number of recommendations to university researchers and host organisations on the facilitative attributes for embedded researchers. Secondly, questions are raised to support university ethics boards to assist ethical frameworks for embedded research. Originality: the article contributes original empirical data to the limited literature on embedded research in children’s services.
  • Development and validation of the suicidal behaviours questionnaire - autism spectrum conditions in a community sample of autistic, possibly autistic and non-autistic adults

    Cassidy, Sarah; Bradley, Louise; Cogger-Ward, Heather; Rodgers, Jacqui; University of Nottingham; University of Bedfordshire; University of Lincoln; Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; Newcastle University (Biomed Central, 2021-06-21)
    Autistic people and those with high autistic traits are at high risk of experiencing suicidality. Yet, there are no suicidality assessment tools developed or validated for these groups. A widely used and validated suicidality assessment tool developed for the general population (SBQ-R), was adapted using feedback from autistic adults, to create the Suicidal Behaviours Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Conditions (SBQ-ASC). The adapted tool was refined through nine interviews, and an online survey with 251 autistic adults, to establish clarity and relevance of the items. Subsequently, 308 autistic, 113 possibly autistic, and 268 non-autistic adults completed the adapted tool online, alongside self-report measures of autistic traits (AQ), camouflaging autistic traits (CAT-Q), depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (ASA-A), thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness (INQ-15), lifetime non-suicidal self-injury, and the original version of the suicidality assessment tool (SBQ-R). Analyses explored the appropriateness and measurement properties of the adapted tool between the groups. There was evidence in support of content validity, structural validity, internal consistency, convergent and divergent validity, test-retest validity, sensitivity and specificity (for distinguishing those with or without lifetime experience of suicide attempt), and hypothesis testing of the adapted tool (SBQ-ASC) in each group. The structure of the SBQ-ASC was equivalent between autistic and possibly autistic adults, regardless of gender, or use of visual aids to help quantify abstract rating scales. The samples involved in the development and validation of the adapted tool were largely female, and largely diagnosed as autistic in adulthood, which limits the generalisability of results to the wider autistic population. The SBQ-ASC has been developed for use in research and is not recommended to assess risk of future suicide attempts and/or self-harm. The SBQ-ASC has been designed with and for autistic and possibly autistic adults, and is not appropriate to compare to non-autistic adults given measurement differences between these groups. The SBQ-ASC is a brief self-report suicidality assessment tool, developed and validated with and for autistic adults, without co-occurring intellectual disability. The SBQ-ASC is appropriate for use in research to identify suicidal thoughts and behaviours in autistic and possibly autistic people, and model associations with risk and protective factors.
  • Introducing forced migration

    Hynes, Patricia (Routledge, 2021-03-31)
    At a time when global debates about the movement of people have never been more heated, this book provides readers with an accessible, student-friendly guide to the subject of forced migration. Readers of this book will learn who forced migrants are, where they are and why international protection is critical in a world of increasingly restrictive legislation and policy. The book outlines key definitions, ideas, concepts, points for discussion, theories and case studies of the various forms of forced migration. In addition to this technical grounding, the book also signposts further reading and provides handy Key Thinker boxes to summarise the work of the field’s most influential academics. Drawing on decades of experience both in the classroom and in the field, this book invites readers to question how labels and definitions are used in legal, policy and practice responses, and to engage in a richer understanding of the lives and realities of forced migrants on the ground. Perfect for undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in courses related to migration and diaspora studies, Introducing Forced Migration will also be valuable to policy-makers, practitioners, journalists, volunteers and aid workers working with refugees, the internally displaced and those who have experienced trafficking.
  • Action to end child sexual abuse and exploitation: a review of the evidence

    Radford, Lorraine; Allnock, Debra; Hynes, Patricia; Shorrock, Sarah; UNICEF and End Violence Against Children; University of Central Lancashire; University of Bedfordshire (UNICEF and End Violence Against Children, 2020-12-01)
    Child sexual abuse and exploitation is prevalent in all countries of the world and has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents. This report commissioned by UNICEF: * describes what is known about the extent, nature and consequences of child sexual abuse and exploitation; * reviews the evidence on effective interventions and strategies to prevent and respond; * synthesises these findings within the overarching INSPIRE and RESPECT strategic approach for violence prevention to recommend specific actions to prevent and respond to child sexual abuse and exploitation.
  • Profiling peer-on-peer abuse

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Hancock, David; Broca, Sandeep; Umaria, Manish; Sloane, Gareth; Golding, Sepia; Levesque, Solenne; Dadabhoy, Farah; Abbott, Matthew; Contextual Safeguarding Network; et al. (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-07-16)
    Since 2013 the MsUnderstood Partnership (MSU), led by the University of Bedfordshire, has been working with local areas across England to develop responses to peer-on-peer abuse which are: a) Contextual: Engage with the families, peer groups, schools and public, neighbourhood spaces associated to peer-on-peer abuse b) Holistic: Recognise the intersecting dynamics of peer-on-peer sexual exploitation, serious youth violence, harmful sexual behaviour and teenage relationship abuse which are often subject to siloed definitions and responses Informed by a contextual audit, MSU delivered support plans with 11 participating local safeguarding children’s boards, comprising six sites. Each site received a different package of support designed to build on the strengths identified during their audit process. One site was a cluster of six London boroughs – Barnet, Camden, Enfield, Haringey, Hackney, and Islington – referred to as the North London (NL) Cluster. In the NL Cluster one area of activity focused upon building profiling capacity through the delivery of a support package to analysts. This briefing has been co-produced by the University of Bedfordshire with analysts who participated in the support programme. It aims to share lessons learnt from the process with other
  • Incorporating contexts into assessments: extract #1

    Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-21)
    This briefing comes directly from the chapter ‘Local Site Work: Approaches, Findings and Resources’ in the MSU report ‘Towards a Contextual Response to Peer-on-Peer Abuse: Research and Resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2106’. To read the briefing in context, please refer to the report, which is available on both the MSU and Contextual Safeguarding Network websites.
  • The role of detached youth work in creating safety for young people in public spaces

    Fritz, Danielle; Firmin, Carlene Emma; Olaitan, Paul; MsUnderstood Partnership; University of Bedfordshire (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-07-17)
    This briefing paper discusses the benefits and limitations of detached youth work provision in creating safety for young people in public spaces. It forms part of a programme of work by the MsUnderstood Partnership to assist the development of local responses to peer-on-peer abuse. The briefing considers unique features of detached youth work; whether workers enhance young people’s safety in public spaces and transform the spaces themselves; factors that constrain the impact of detached youth work; and implications of the findings on safeguarding and commissioning.

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