Now showing items 1-20 of 189

    • The role of gender in students' ratings of teaching quality in computer science and environmental engineering

      Price, Linda; Svensson, Ingrid; Borell, Jonas; Richardson, John T.E. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017-05-03)
      Students' ratings of teaching quality on course units in a computer science program and an environmental engineering program at a large Swedish university were obtained using the Course Experience Questionnaire; 8888 sets of ratings were obtained from men and 4280 sets were obtained from women over ten academic years. These student ratings from the two programs showed certain differences; in particular, teachers tended to receive higher ratings in subjects that were less typical for their gender than in subjects that were more typical for their gender. There were differences in the ratings given to male and female teachers, differences in the ratings given by male and female students, and interactions between these two effects. There was no systematic trend for students to give different ratings to teachers of the same gender as themselves than to teachers of the other gender. Nevertheless, without exception, even the statistically significant effects were small in magnitude and unlikely to be of theoretical or practical importance. It is concluded that the causes of differences in the career progression of male and female teachers in engineering education need to be sought elsewhere.
    • Supporting sustainable policy and practices for online learning education

      Casanova, Diogo; Price, Linda; Avery, Barry (Springer, 2018-12-31)
      This chapter describes an approach to the adoption of online learning in Higher Education. It is particularly relevant for readers interested in Online and Distance Learning initiatives that enact an agenda of climate change education through being sustainable and future proof. We present a pathway for ensuring sustainable educational initiatives, drawing from research that identifies crucial factors in this endeavour. In particular, it addresses how the adoption of Online and Distance Learning can be used as a catalyst for changing the pedagogical paradigm of universities and how this change may impact on the development of new policies and guidelines. In this chapter we report on how policy, guidelines and professional development can be designed for sustainable and consistent learning design and teaching practices.
    • Identity formation among novice academic teachers–a longitudinal study

      McLean, Neil; Price, Linda (Routledge, 2017-12-03)
      This study reports findings from an in-depth, longitudinal investigation of the formation of 13 novice tutors’ professional identities as academic teachers. The study spanned tutors’ first two years in-service, while they were also participating in a teacher development course. Discourse was analysed across 65 time-series coursework texts, completed as part of the tutors’ reflection on their teaching practice. The analysis captured the use of explicit identity positioning cues by tutors across the texts. Four discreet identity positions were catalogued: academic insider, class teacher, teaching course participant and young academic. The study illustrates how these tutors developed more complex identity narratives with enriched coherence over time as they reported negotiating challenges and dissonance between initial expectations and actual teaching experiences. This finding offers explanatory support for previous research regarding the value of longer term teacher development programmes and illuminates existing theoretical models with practitioner perspectives.
    • A longitudinal study of the impact of reflective coursework writing on teacher development courses: a ‘legacy effect’ of iterative writing tasks

      McLean, Neil; Price, Linda (Springer Netherlands, 2018-09-16)
      Studies into the efficacy of teacher development courses for early career academics point to graduates conceiving of their teaching in increasingly complex and student-focussed ways. These studies have used pre- and post-testing of conceptions of teaching to identify this finding. However, these studies do not identify what aspects of these courses contributed to these changes. This exploratory case study investigates this phenomenon through a longitudinal study of 16 academic teachers’ reflective coursework writing. Discourse analysis was used to contrast causal reasoning statements in assignments completed during participants’ first 2 years in-service, while they were completing a UK-based teacher development course. This analysis identified how reasoning about teaching and learning became more complex over time. A key element was the integration of experiences and earlier learning into more nuanced and multi-factorial later reasoning about teaching choices and effects. This ‘legacy effect’ provides new evidence for the efficacy of academic teacher development courses.
    • Advancing cultures of innovation: The change laboratory as an intervention to facilitate agency and collaborative sustainable development among teachers in higher education

      Englund, Claire; Price, Linda (Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE), 2018-12-31)
      To cope with the rapidly changing Higher Education climate, teachers need the agency to act proactively to initiate and steer changes to meet their needs. The results of this study indicate that transformative agency emerges when teachers are given the opportunity to analyse, envision and redesign their practice collaboratively with the help of mediating conceptual tools. This has implications for academic development, suggesting that activities providing a ‘third space’ for discussion and criticism of current practices is needed to support the development of agency thus creating a culture of innovative practice.
    • Facilitating agency: the change laboratory as an intervention for collaborative sustainable development in higher education

      Englund, Claire; Price, Linda (Routledge, 2018-06-06)
      To cope with the rapidly changing higher education climate, teachers need agency to act proactively in initiating and steering changes in practice. This paper describes an academic development activity in the form of a Change Laboratory, an intervention method based on Cultural-Historical Activity Theory, to facilitate agency among teachers. The results of the study indicate that transformative agency emerges when teachers are given the opportunity to analyse, envision, and redesign their practice collaboratively. This has implications for academic development, suggesting that activities facilitating discussion, analysis, and criticism of current practices are needed to support the development of agency.
    • Moving towards sustainable policy and practice – a five level framework for online learning sustainability / Progresser vers des politiques et des pratiques durables: un cadre à cinq niveaux pour un apprentissage en ligne durable

      Casanova, Diogo; Price, Linda; University of West London; University of Bedfordshire (Canadian Network for Innovation in Education (CNIE), 2018-12-31)
      This paper addresses the issue of sustainability in online learning in higher education. It introduces and discusses a five-level framework for helping higher education institutions to make the transition from enterprise to sustainable policy and practice in online learning. In particular, it responds to evidence in the literature regarding the lack of sustainability in online learning in higher education. Influenced by Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, this framework is characterized by three different clusters: basic needs, institutional motivation, and stakeholders’ motivations. It is presented hierarchically within five different levels. Examples are provided for each of the levels and suggestions are given to how institutions should respond to each level.
    • The influence of sociocultural and structural contexts in academic change and development in higher education

      Englund, Claire; Olofsson, Anders D.; Price, Linda (Springer, 2018-03-10)
      Teaching quality improvements frequently focus upon the ‘development’ of individual academics in higher education. However, research also shows that the academics’ context has considerable influence upon their practices. This study examines the working environments of teachers on an online pharmacy programme, investigating contextual conditions that facilitate or impede academic change and development. Interview data and institutional policy documents are examined within a Cultural-Historical Activity Theory framework. Distinct differences in the teachers’ sociocultural context were identified as influencing change and development. Departmental teaching cultures and patterns of communication influenced practice both positively, by offering collegial support, and negatively by impeding change. The findings have significance for academic development strategies. They suggest that departmental-level support should include communicative pathways that promote reflection upon and development of conceptions of teaching and learning.
    • Review of Influencing early childhood education: key figures, philosophies and ideas

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2017-11-08)
      Book review of Influencing early childhood education: key figures, philosophies and ideas, Linda Pound, Open University Press, 2011 9780335241569
    • Review of Breaking through the language arts block: organizing and managing the exemplary literacy day

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-01)
      Book review of Breaking Through the Language Arts Block Organizing and Managing the Exemplary Literacy Day Lesley Mandel Morrow, Kenneth Kunz, and Maureen Hall Guilford Press, 2018 9781462534463
    • Book review: Making sense of neuroscience in the Early Years

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2017-11-08)
      Book review of Making sense of neuroscience in the Early Years Sally Featherstone Featherstone, 2017 9781472938312
    • Book review: Vocabulary assessment to support instruction: building rich word-learning experiences

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-10-11)
      Book review of Vocabulary Assessment to Support Instruction: Building Rich Word-Learning Experiences Margaret G. McKeown et al Guilford Press, 2017 9781462530793
    • Book review: Educating outside

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-19)
      Book review of Educating Outside: Curriculum-linked outdoor learning ideas for primary teachers By: Helen Porter Bloomsbury Education, 2018 9781472946300
    • Book review: Teaching religious education: researchers in the classroom

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-07-04)
      Book review of Teaching Religious Education Researchers in the Classroom By: Julian Stern Bloomsbury, 2018 9781350037113
    • Review of Inside teaching: how to make a difference for every learner and teacher

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-02-02)
      Book review of Inside Teaching: How to Make a Difference for Every Learner and Teacher By John Blanchard Routledge, 2017 9781138712294
    • Review of Mastering primary design and technology

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-11-26)
      Book review of Mastering Primary Design and Technology, Gill Hope, Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, ISBN 9781474295390
    • Review of Working together for children: a critical introduction to multi-agency working

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2018-10-10)
      Book review of Working together for children: a critical introduction to multi-agency working, Gary Walker, Continuum, 2008, 9780826498175
    • Part-time students in transition: supporting a successful start to higher education

      Goodchild, Allyson; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis, 2017-12-21)
      The transition into higher education is a critical time for all students. A positive early experience provides a strong foundation for future academic success whilst a negative experience can be destabilising for a new learner. To date, research has primarily focused on full-time undergraduates in order to explain the reasons for high attrition rates at the end of the first year. Less is known about the experiences of part-time undergraduates despite the fact that they make up over one quarter of the total student population (HESA, 2015). This article reports on a study to investigate the initial experiences of a group of part-time undergraduates who have chosen to undertake a degree at a small study centre run by one university. Using a mixed methods research approach, the research captured the lived reality of the experience and identified the contributing and negating factors that can influence a successful transition. Perceptions of the level and type of support provided for students during transition were gained from both staff and students. The findings confirm a heterogeneous group. Despite being highly motivated, the early transition period was generally characterised by a sense of trepidation and self-doubt as students took their first steps in higher education. The research highlights the complexity of the initial decision-making process for part-time students and the barriers they face. It concludes that a flexible but unified approach, involving tutors and the wider support services, is needed, as unique students require unique responses to their transition needs.
    • A longitudinal study of the impact of reflective coursework writing on teacher development courses: a "legacy effect' of iterative writing tasks

      McLean, Neil; Price, Linda (Springer, 2018-09-19)
      Studies into the efficacy of teacher development courses for early career academics point to graduates conceiving of their teaching in increasingly complex and student-focussed ways. These studies have used pre- and post-testing of conceptions of teaching to identify this finding. However, these studies do not identify what aspects of these courses contributed to these changes. This exploratory case study investigates this phenomenon through a longitudinal study of 16 academic teachers’ reflective coursework writing. Discourse analysis was used to contrast causal reasoning statements in assignments completed during participants’ first 2 years in-service, while they were completing a UK-based teacher development course. This analysis identified how reasoning about teaching and learning became more complex over time. A key element was the integration of experiences and earlier learning into more nuanced and multi-factorial later reasoning about teaching choices and effects. This ‘legacy effect’ provides new evidence for the efficacy of academic teacher development courses.
    • "First meetings": constructive first encounters between pre-service teachers and their mentors

      Connolly, Steve M.; Bates, Gareth; Shea, James (Emerald, 2020-07-01)
      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from an action research project in which the researchers sought to develop a set of questions for use by mentors (experienced teachers) and mentees (pre-service teachers) on a course of initial teacher education (ITE) when they first met – the “initial encounter”. Design Methodology/Approach: The researchers used an action research approach to address the lower retention rate of pre-service teachers from different backgrounds, such as Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME), and the issues around mentoring which may exacerbate this problem. Discussions between the course team and participating mentors and mentees suggested that the initial encounter between mentor and mentee was significant, and an action research methodology would allow for developing questions that might structure such encounters. Findings: The researchers found that a useful and effective set of questions could be developed and used by mentors and mentees. Additionally, this process gave researchers insights into the nature of the first encounters between mentors and mentees on an ITE course and how both groups see their roles. In several cycles of action research, the participants produced a number of iterations of such questions, which were refined across a two-year period. Research Limitations/Implications: While it is too early to tell if the issues leading to the lower retention rate of pre-service teachers that prompted the project have been reduced in any significant way, the researchers suggest that thinking about these initial encounters can impact the way a mentor and mentee goes on to build a relationship. Originality/Value: The authors found very little research in the field of teacher education which looks at initial encounters between mentors and mentees and thus make an original contribution to the mentoring literature.