• Review of Relationships and Sex Education 3-11: supporting children's development and well-being [book review]

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2020-03-15)
      Review of Relationships and Sex Education 3-11: supporting children’s development and well-being by Sacha Mason and Richard Wolley, London, Bloomsbury, 2019, 233 pp., £24.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978 1 350 08071 3
    • Review of Subject teaching in primary education

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2020-01-19)
      Book review: Subject teaching in primary education edited by Patrick Smith and Lyn Dawes, London, Sage, 2014, 275 pp., £21.28 (paperback), ISBN 9781446267899
    • Review of Working together for children: a critical introduction to multi-agency working

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2018-10-10)
      Book review of Working together for children: a critical introduction to multi-agency working, Gary Walker, Continuum, 2008, 9780826498175
    • Review of: Building systems that work for young children: international insights from innovative early childhood systems

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2021-07-16)
      Book review of: Building systems that work for young children: international insights from innovative early childhood systems, edited by Sharon Lynn Kagan, 2019, Columbia University: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 248 pp., £24.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-0-8077-6129-8
    • Review of: Friedrich Froebel: a critical introduction to key themes and debates

      Mistry, Malini Tina; (Routledge, 2021-10-15)
      Review of: Friedrich Froebel: a critical introduction to key themes and debates by Tina Bruce, London Bloomsbury, 2021, 167 pp., £19.99 (paperback), ISBN 9781474250429
    • Review of: Teaching PSHE and R(S)HE in primary schools: enhancing the whole curriculum

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Routledge, 2021-11-18)
      Review of: Teaching PSHE and R(S)HE in primary schools: Enhancing the whole curriculum edited by Victoria Pugh and Daniel Hughes, London, Bloomsbury, 2021, 200 pp., £19.25 (paperback), ISBN: 9781350129887
    • Special educational needs co-ordinators' perceptions of effective provision for including autistic children in primary and middle schools in England

      Wearmouth, Janice; Butler, Cathal (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-18)
      In the Autumn of 2017 a small-scale study was designed to explore the degree to which school staff in the East Midlands of England were in an informed position to meet their statutory obligation with regard to the autistic children in their care as reported by a sample of special educational needs coordinators (SENCos), members of the school staff in the best position to shed light on the topic. Findings indicated that the SENCos in the study under consideration here were clear that, overall, they were confident in their own abilities to assess autistic learners' strengths and weaknesses and plan for meeting identified needs. They were much less confident that their colleagues with prime responsibility for classroom teaching and implementing special arrangements had commensurate knowledge and understanding, or even necessarily were very well disposed or well enough informed to differentiate classroom activities appropriately.
    • Why are there still so few men within Early Years in primary schools: views from male trainee teachers and male leaders?

      Mistry, Malini Tina; Sood, Krishan (Routledge, 2013-01-29)
      One of the challenges facing the Early Years (EY) sector is how to encourage more male practitioners to counterbalance a largely feminised workforce. Using case studies of male trainees at different stages of their primary undergraduate Initial Teacher Training course at one university, we attempt to consider data why there is under-representation of men within the leadership strata in EY settings. Questionnaires and interviews were conducted with the male sample groups and male leaders in primary schools to gain an overview regarding gender stereotyping. Our findings suggest that male trainees enjoy working in the EY sector, but they need mentoring by strong leaders to help them overcome the perceived contextual barriers of male stereotypes in that setting. In conclusion, we consider some of these barriers of stereotypes, attitudes, values, beliefs existing and the actions needed in addressing such stereotypes if a long-lasting change is to happen.