• E-learning or e-teaching? What's the difference in practice?

      Price, Linda; Kirkwood, Adrian; Kingston University (2005-04-01)
    • E-portfolio: a practical tool for self-directed, reflective, and collaborative professional learning

      Daunert, Anna Liza; Price, Linda; Harteis, Christian; Ruasch, Andreas; Seifried, Jurgen; University of Paderborn; Open University (Springer Netherlands, 2014-01-01)
      This chapter discusses the role of an e-portfolio in professional learning and development. We begin by providing a better understanding of the concept of a portfolio by discussing its meaning, purpose and uses in different contexts as well as the role of technological innovations, which paves the way for new practices in developing portfolios. This is followed by a comprehensive discussion about the use of electronic portfolios in light of recent research in order to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of using e-portfolios. Current research suggests that e-portfolios are practical tools for supporting self-directed and reflective learning. In addition, e-portfolios have the potential to support collaborative learning among learners who are interested in sharing their works and in gaining feedback. At the end of the chapter, we discuss an approach to designing professional learning and development plans, which serves as a guide for
    • Education for democratic citizenship in Ireland

      Butler, Cathal (Taylor and Francis, 2019-12-17)
      This chapter explores the complex historical, political and religious context that frame discussions around citizenship and democracy within education in Ireland, as an independent nation, and as a member of the European Union. What it means to be a citizen in Ireland will be explored.The focus is primarily on the Republic of Ireland, though issues that arise in Northern Ireland will also be covered. The chapter will focus on curriculum subject areas that touch on citizenship and democracy, past and present. The extent to which policy and practice can map onto the key concepts set out in the Council of Europe's framework of competences for democratic culture will be explored, with a specific focus on the extent to which teachers are trained to be able to teach these subjects.
    • Education for offenders in prison

      Crabbe, M. James C.; University of Bedfordshire; University of Oxford (University of Bedfordshire, 2016-11)
      Prisoners are a group of people often forgotten or ignored by society as a whole. Yet recidivism (reoffending) is a serious drain on resources worldwide, and tackling it has been the subject of much research and policy development. Education in secure environments and beyond helps offenders, reduces recidivism and improves employability. Here, we address current and future pathways in offender education, involving Information Technology and offender-led learning. These issues have been studied in the Coates Review (2016), which should be an important breakthrough in improving education in prisons, and effecting culture change about prisoner education in and beyond prisons.
    • Education, knowledge, and symbolic form

      Belas, Oliver; University of Bedfordshire (2017-12-20)
      This article aims to introduce Ernst Cassirer, and his philosophy of symbolic form, to education studies, and, in doing so, to challenge the widespread but deeply flawed views of knowledge and so-called knowledge-based education that have shaped recent education policy in England. After sketching the current educational landscape, and then some of the main lines of flight in Cassirer’s work, time is given to a comparison with Heidegger—a more familiar figure by far in Anglophone philosophy than Cassirer, and who contributed to the displacement of Cassirer—in order to illustrate more clearly Cassirer’s original contribution, in particular to the relationship between knowledge and time. Cassirer’s view of knowledge stands in marked and critical contrast to that which has shaped recent educational reform in England, as he sees knowledge as a productive and expressive matter, and repudiates what I call the ‘building-blocks’ picture of knowledge and the hierarchisation of subject areas.
    • The educator’s role in Higher Education: position papers from a project of the Special Interest Group Higher Education of the Worshipful Company of Educators

      Crabbe, M. James C.; Löwe, Benedikt; Weaver, M. (2018-12-20)
      The Company of Educators was set up in the year 2017 and currently has over thirty members who are Freemen and Liverymen of the company interested in Higher Education, Higher Education policy, research, and research training. Topics of interest include educational methods and concepts for universities, training of doctoral students, training of skills relevant for higher education; mentoring and career development of junior academics. The group is chaired by Benedikt Löwe. So far, the SIGHE had two meetings, one at Christ's College, Cambridge, on 3 November 2017 and one at New College, Oxford, on 20 January 2018. During these meetings, SIGHE decided on a number of projects that would define and inform the discussion of the members of the group. The first project, entitled The educator’s role in Higher Education: What distinguishes it from other educational sectors?, is coordinated by James Crabbe and Max Weaver. The two coordinators have produced two position papers that constitute this document. The position papers are to be seen as personal statements of their respective authors rather than a description of the position of the SIGHE, let alone the company. They are supposed to provoke useful reflection and discussion. The authors of the papers encourage readers to contact them directly and discuss the content of the papers.
    • Effective SENCO : meeting the challenge

      Wearmouth, Janice (McGraw-Hill Education, 2015-06-18)
      The co-ordination of special educational provision in schools is multi-faceted and challenging. New legislation in England, the Children and Families Act, introduced in September 2014, strengthens and extends the legal requirement to ensure the availability and effective co-ordination of high quality provision for special needs and disabilities (SEND) in schools and, for the first time, in further education colleges. The Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice 0–25 years (DfE, 2014a) is an overt component of central government policy in the area of special educational needs with its status of statutory guidance. Teachers in schools and colleges continue to be expected to provide effective learning opportunities for all their pupils, including those who have special educational needs and disabilities. Schools, colleges and other settings have clear duties under the statutory guidance of the new Code and must ‘have regard’ to its contents. They should do what it says or be able to explain why they have not done so and explain the alternative provision that has been made. It is no longer sufficient, however, simply to ensure that young people with SEND have access to an appropriate education. Instead, Section 19(d) of Part 3 of the 2014 Children and Families Act specifies access that enables young people to ‘achieve the best possible’ educational and other outcomes. This reflects a new and higher level of outcome required by law. Effective co-ordination of SEND provision therefore continues to be high priority for senior management teams, governors, parents and politicians. School governors also have particular responsibilities towards young people with SEND in schools. Section 66 of the 2014 Act contains a key duty on the governing body of a school – and this includes the proprietors or management committee where relevant – to use their ‘best endeavours’ to secure special educational provision for all children or young people for whom they are responsible. It is essential that all involved understand what ‘having’ a special educational need or disability means for the young person and his or her family, and what addressing such needs and disabilities entails in schools. At the same time the requirement for all new special educational needs and disability co-ordinators (SENCOs) to take the National Award for SEN Co-ordination (NASC) has remained in place. Included in the new learning outcomes of the NASC which have been revised in light of the recent amendments to the law is a revision of what is required in terms of professional knowledge and understanding for the SENCO role. This book was therefore designed as an accessible, well-theorised and practical resource to help new and experienced SENCOs and those in training to carry out their duties in supporting the development and improvement of SEND provision from a thoughtful and confident position that is very well informed in current legislation, practice, theory and critical understanding of the issues in the field. It therefore provides a well-balanced and accessible overview of the following: * the new (2014) legislation related to SEND provision and the new SEND Code of Practice and the implications for schools and colleges, and the role of the SENCO in particular; * key challenges of the SENCO role, as identified by experienced, effective, practising SENCOs, and how these might be addressed; * what SENCOs really need to know and what they can and should do in order to co-ordinate provision for SEND properly and effectively. It also comprehensively covers the (2014) learning outcomes of the National Award for Special Educational Needs Co-ordination. Current legislation promotes the inclusion of (almost) all young people in mainstream schools and colleges. However, this has to be implemented within a national context of school and college ‘improvement’ and competition and market-oriented practices where young people with SEND may not be able to contribute positively to a school’s position on league tables of achievement. Such challenges are not necessarily insurmountable, however, and the book discusses the debates and dilemmas and offers practical suggestions to address these.
    • Emotions and professional reflections in a post-war community: teachers’ perspectives from Kosovo

      Berisha Kida, Edona; Butler, Cathal; University of Pristine; University of Bedfordshire (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2020-11-05)
      Background: Teaching is more complex than dealing with the cognitive aspects of learning alone and is also influenced by affective states. Because of this, more research is needed into the role of teachers’ emotions in classroom interaction. Of special importance is research into reflective thinking and the extent to which it may be disturbed by the prior experience of trauma. Purpose: This study aimed to shed light on these issues by analysing reports of Kosovan teachers’ emotional arousal when speaking about and/or teaching topics related to war experiences, their beliefs about these experiences, their opinions about students’ reactions and their reports on professional reflective practices. Methods: Descriptive study. Data were collected by means of a structured questionnaire completed by 70 teachers. Results: Teachers reported strong emotions were triggered by discussion of topics linked to the war. Their beliefs influenced how they engaged with sensitive and emotionally charged topics, but they interpreted their professional behaviour using reflective and critical thinking. Conclusion: Both external and internal factors affect post-war teachers cognitively and emotionally. Further research is needed to identify the extent to which this impacts teachers’ ability to use critical reflection and critical emotional reflexivity in school-based practice.
    • Employing culturally responsive pedagogy to foster literacy learning in schools

      Wearmouth, Janice (Taylor & Francis, 2017-03-16)
       In recent years it has become increasingly obvious that, to enable students in schools from an increasingly diverse range of cultural backgrounds to acquire literacy to a standard that will support them to achieve academically, it is important to adopt pedagogy that is responsive to, and respectful of, them as culturally situated. What largely has been omitted from the literature, however, is discussion of a relevant model of learning to underpin this approach. For this reason this paper adopts a socio-cultural lens (Vygotsky, 1978) through which to view such pedagogy and refers to a number of seminal texts to justify of its relevance. Use of this lens is seen as having a particular rationale. It forces a focus on the agency of the teacher as a mediator of learning who needs to acknowledge the learner’s cultural situatedness (Kozulin, 2003) if school literacy learning for all students is to be as successful as it might be. It also focuses attention on the predominant value systems and social practices that characterize the school settings in which students’ literacy learning is acquired. The paper discusses implications for policy and practice at whole-school, classroom and individual student levels of culturally-responsive pedagogy that is based on a socio-cultural model of learning. In doing so it draws on illustrations from the work of a number of researchers, including that of the author.
    • Empowerers, inspirers, knowledge providers # living the dream: FE teachers' professional identity in challenging times

      Thompson, Carol; Wolstencroft, Peter (Universite Rennes 2/ESREA, 2019-03-01)
      The dynamic nature of English Further Education (FE) has caused a crisis of identity for many tutors in the sector.  The reduction in funding (Tickle, 2014) and the focus on the product, rather than the process of learning, has changed the role of the educator and also their ability to articulate their professional status.  Recent research (Thompson and Wolstencroft, 2017) found that there has been a significant shift in role perception for FE practitioners.  Previously, teachers in the sector identified themselves within an educational paradigm underpinned by notions of social justice which prioritised student achievement from a developmental perspective.  Through progressive cultural shifts towards a more data driven focus this perspective now acknowledges a different definition of 'achievement' which in turn has had an impact on teachers' agency and professional identity. In the first stage of this research, a case study approach was taken to compare two diverse organisations within the FE sector in England.  Purposive sampling was used to select a cross section of participants for semi-structured interviews.  This was followed up by focus groups to explore the initial findings.  The final stage of the research extended beyond the initial case study organisations and used a questionnaire to explore respondents' definitions of their professional roles.  The initial findings depicted a group of professionals constrained by rigorously monitored working environments, who, after completing teacher education had limited involvement in wider professional communities.  Similarly, participants in the second phase of the research depicted professional identities which were clearly set in context.  The research also revealed practitioners’ aspirations in relation to the purpose of their professional roles alongside a pragmatic acceptance of the constraints which detracted from achieving this purpose.
    • Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: a guide to evidence-based practice for academic developers

      Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda; Higher Education Academy; Open University (Higher Education Academy, 2011-01-01)
      This is a guide to help academic-developers support academics in developing scholarly and evidence-based approaches to learning and teaching with technology. This has guide been peer reviewed by the Higher Education Academy.
    • Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: a guide to evidence-based practice for academics

      Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda; Higher Education Academy; Open University (Higher Education Academy, 2011-01-01)
      This is a guide to help support academics develop scholarly and evidence-based approaches to learning and teaching with technology. This guide has been peer reviewed by the Higher Education Academy.
    • Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: a guide to evidence-based practice for policy makers

      Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda; Higher Education Academy; Open University (Higher Education Academy, 2011-01-01)
      This is a guide to help Policy-makers support academics in developing scholarly and evidence-based approaches to learning and teaching with technology. This has guide been peer reviewed by the Higher Education Academy.
    • Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: a table of resources for academic developers

      Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda; Higher Education Academy (Higher Education Academy, 2011-01-01)
      This is a resource that provides a listing of studies that have been reviewed that may be of use to academic developers who are supporting academics interested in using technology in their learning and teaching activities. The studies have been examined in relation to an evidence-based approach as reported in the studies. A framework has been used to report the studies and interpret variations between them. The resources are listed by media types to help orient readers.
    • Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: a table of resources for academics

      Price, Linda; Kirkwood, Adrian; Higher Education Academy (Higher Education Academy, 2011-01-01)
      This is a resource that provides a listing of studies that have been reviewed that may be of use to HE practitioners interested in using technology in their learning and teaching activities. The studies have been examined in relation to an evidence-based approach as reported in the studies. A framework has been used to report the studies and interpret variations between them. The resources are listed by media types to help orient readers.
    • Enhancing learning and teaching through technology: a table of resources for policy makers

      Price, Linda; Kirkwood, Adrian; Higher Education Academy; Open University (Higher Education Academy, 2011-01-01)
      This is a resource that provides a listing of studies that have been reviewed that may be of use to policy makers who are supporting academics who are using technology in their learning and teaching activities. The studies have been examined in relation to an evidence-based approach as reported in the studies. A framework has been used to report the studies and interpret variations between them. The resources are listed by media types to help orient readers.
    • Enhancing professional learning and teaching through technology: a synthesis of evidence-based practice among teachers in higher education

      Price, Linda; Kirkwood, Adrian; Institute of Educational Technology; Open University (Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, 2011-01-01)
      This synthesis provides a review of evidence-based practice to learning and teaching with technology in higher education. The evidence was considered in relation to the three levels of purpose of identified in the HEFCE e-Learning Strategy namely: efficiency, enhancement and transformation gains in student learning. A further framework was devised in this synthesis to determine where evidence might be of use and the extent of its impact. This was to support a range of stakeholders (practitioners, educational developers and policy makers) in making the best use of evidence in their particular roles. The synthesis is limited to scrutinising the application of technology in learning and teaching. It focused on a demonstration of the use of evidence in the practices of professional teachers in higher education, and how this evidence might change practice.
    • Evaluating and assessing student oral presentations: a limited but effective role for employers in the geography curriculum

      Church, Andrew; Bull, Paul (Routledge, 1995-05-01)
      Employers were involved in assessing students’ presentations, giving feedback and in the development of staff skills for providing feedback. The curriculum context to the oral presentations is described and the problems and benefits of employer involvement are considered. It is argued that it is possible to develop an effective small‐scale approach to employer involvement as an alternative to major schemes.
    • Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education

      Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda (Blackwell Publishing, 2013-06-04)
      This article examines assumptions and beliefs underpinning research into educational technology. It critically reviews some approaches used to investigate the impact of technologies for teaching and learning. It focuses on comparative studies, performance comparisons and attitudinal studies to illustrate how under-examined assumptions lead to questionable findings. The extent to which it is possible to substantiate some of the claims made about the impact of technologies on the basis of these approaches and methods is questioned. We contend researchers should ensure that they acknowledge underlying assumptions and the limitations imposed by the approach adopted in order to appropriately interpret findings.