• Becoming a home-educator in a networked world: towards the democratisation of education alternatives?

      Fensham-Smith, Amber; University of Bedfordshire (Other Business, 2019-06-09)
      The internet is assumed to play a special role in UK home-education and has apparently fuelled an increase its prevalence. This paper reports the place and purpose of the internet, online networks and offline communities in the decision to home-educate amongst parents in England, Scotland and Wales. The research formed part of a mixed-method doctoral study that included: an online survey of 242 home-educators; 52 individual and group interviews with 85 parents, children and young people and a week-long participant observation with families. The sample included a range of both ‘new’ and ‘experienced’ home-educators. The findings show that online and offline networking helped prospective parents to learn of home-education as a viable and positive alternative to schooled provision. For parents, socialising with existing home-educators was pivotal for cultivating a sense of identity, belonging and commitment to an education without school. At the same time, becoming a legitimate home-educator was a complex achievement; hinged upon social and economic resources and cultural competencies. Evidence of exclusionary practices among home-educators both online and offline, challenges the extent to which home-education is truly more ‘open’ now than it once was. In the decision to home-educate, it is concluded that the democratising potential of the internet points to ‘old wine in new bottles’.
    • Becoming a learner in the workplace: a student’s guide to practice–based and work-based learning in health and social care

      Wareing, Mark; University of Bedfordshire (Quay Books, 2016-04-01)
      This student guide has been written to help support you to engage in practice-based and work-based learning in a range of health and social care settings. An increasing number of students are undertaking health and social care studies that include placement learning including those studying at higher apprenticeship and foundation degree level who are seeking to use clinical workplaces and practice areas for learning. This book has also been written for those studying traditional undergraduate health professions such as nursing and midwifery, and will be useful for those undertaking practice-based learning in radiography, social work and the therapies. It provides the reader with a through understanding of the challenges and opportunities of practice and work-based learning that requires a range of skills, strategies, techniques and attitudes to empower readers to be fully equipped to engage in participatory workplace learning. Each chapter contains a range of activities that will require the reader to think about their own experience and the skills required to engage in practice-based or work-based learning. The purpose of the activities is to bring each chapter to life and enable the reader to engage with the text actively rather than passively
    • Black male student teachers: tomorrow’s teachers?

      Maylor, Uvanney (Emerald, 17-12-15)
      England’s school population is ethnically diverse yet the teacher workforce is predominantly White and female. While Black teachers are in short supply in England, Black male teachers are even fewer in number. This article seeks to understand the shortage of Black male teachers through the qualitative experiences of a small group of Black male pre-service teachers. Utilising critical race theory the article seeks to understand the preparation that a group of Black male pre-service teachers during their teacher training course and its impact on their willingness to commit to entering the teaching profession. The article questions whether Black pre-service teachers experience of a lack of acceptance in schools during their pre-service training contributes to the under-representation of Black male teachers in English schools.
    • Black supplementary school leaders: community leadership strategies for successful schools

      Maylor, Uvanney; University of Bedfordshire (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2020-08-25)
      Long established in the United Kingdom, Black supplementary schools are valued by Black parents for their ability to nurture the academic potential of Black students and achieve positive educational outcomes where mainstream schools sometimes fail. Through exploratory qualitative interviews conducted with a small group of African-Caribbean supplementary school leaders, this article seeks to understand Black supplementary school leaders’ perceptions of educational leadership and supplementary school success. Utilising Yosso’s perspective on ‘community cultural wealth’, in particular the ways in which Black communities provide and are rich in cultural/educational resources, the article examines the extent to which the leadership perceptions of Black supplementary school leaders are rooted in notions of community and serving, along with the leadership strategies they employ in creating successful schools. Such insights are especially important at a time when mainstream education continues to deliver poor educational outcomes for Black students.
    • Black supplementary school leaders: community leadership strategies for successful schools

      Maylor, Uvanney; University of Bedfordshire (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2020-08-25)
      Long established in the United Kingdom, Black supplementary schools are valued by Black parents for their ability to nurture the academic potential of Black students and achieve positive educational outcomes where mainstream schools sometimes fail. Through exploratory qualitative interviews conducted with a small group of African-Caribbean supplementary school leaders, this article seeks to understand Black supplementary school leaders’ perceptions of educational leadership and supplementary school success. Utilising Yosso’s perspective on ‘community cultural wealth’, in particular the ways in which Black communities provide and are rich in cultural/educational resources, the article examines the extent to which the leadership perceptions of Black supplementary school leaders are rooted in notions of community and serving, along with the leadership strategies they employ in creating successful schools. Such insights are especially important at a time when mainstream education continues to deliver poor educational outcomes for Black students.
    • Black women academics and senior managers resisting gendered racism in British higher education institutions

      Wright, Cecile; Maylor, Uvanney; Watson, Valerie (Springer International Publishing, 2018-12-31)
      This chapter analyses Black women academics and senior managers’ experiences of working in UK higher education. Testimony included in this chapter is drawn from the authors’ experiences with White staff, and critical discussion and shared reflection as the chapter was being prepared. The chapter utilises the theoretical lenses of intersectionality and critical race theory that have coincided with and been supported by the phenomenological experiences of the authors. The womens’ narratives reflect notions of resistance and resilience, which coalesce around themes of challenging visibility and invisibility, negotiating institutional power and the use of their networks in sustaining their survival.
    • BNCI systems as a potential assistive technology: ethical issues and participatory research in the BrainAble project

      Carmichael, Patrick; Carmichael, Clare; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor & Francis, 2013-12-06)
      This paper highlights aspects related to current research and thinking about ethical issues in relation to Brain Computer Interface (BCI) and Brain-Neuronal Computer Interfaces (BNCI) research through the experience of one particular project, BrainAble, which is exploring and developing the potential of these technologies to enable people with complex disabilities to control computers. It describes how ethical practice has been developed both within the multidisciplinary research team and with participants. Results: The paper presents findings in which participants shared their views of the project prototypes, of the potential of BCI/BNCI systems as an assistive technology, and of their other possible applications. This draws attention to the importance of ethical practice in projects where high expectations of technologies, and representations of “ideal types” of disabled users may reinforce stereotypes or drown out participant “voices”. Conclusions: Ethical frameworks for research and development in emergent areas such as BCI/BNCI systems should be based on broad notions of a “duty of care” while being sufficiently flexible that researchers can adapt project procedures according to participant needs. They need to be frequently revisited, not only in the light of experience, but also to ensure they reflect new research findings and ever more complex and powerful technologies.
    • Book review: Educating outside

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-19)
      Book review of Educating Outside: Curriculum-linked outdoor learning ideas for primary teachers By: Helen Porter Bloomsbury Education, 2018 9781472946300
    • Book review: How to be an outstanding nursery leader

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-20)
      Review of How to be an outstanding nursery leader by Allison Lee, 2018, London, Bloomsbury, 182 pp., £12.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978 1 4729 5257 8
    • Book review: Making sense of neuroscience in the Early Years

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2017-11-08)
      Book review of Making sense of neuroscience in the Early Years Sally Featherstone Featherstone, 2017 9781472938312
    • Book review: School readiness and the characteristics of effective learning: the essential guide for Early Years practitioners

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-17)
      Book review of School readiness and the characteristics of effective learning: the essential guide for Early Years practitioners by Tamsin Grimmer, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018, 206 pp.,, £13.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978 1 78592-175-9
    • Book review: Teaching religious education: researchers in the classroom

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-07-04)
      Book review of Teaching Religious Education Researchers in the Classroom By: Julian Stern Bloomsbury, 2018 9781350037113
    • Book review: Using film to understand childhood and practice

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-17)
      Book review of Using film to understand childhood and practice edited by Sue Aitken, London, Bloomsbury, 2018, 235 pp., £18.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-4742-7455-5
    • Book review: Vocabulary assessment to support instruction: building rich word-learning experiences

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor & Francis, 2018-10-11)
      Book review of Vocabulary Assessment to Support Instruction: Building Rich Word-Learning Experiences Margaret G. McKeown et al Guilford Press, 2017 9781462530793
    • Book review: Your booksmart, school- savvy, stress-busting primary teacher training companion

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2021-03-29)
      review of: Your booksmart, school- savvy, stress-busting primary teacher training companion by Elizabeth Malone, 2020, London, Sage, 178 pp., £16.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-5264-9419-1
    • Building the foundations for academic success: learning from the experiences of part-time students in their first semester of study

      Goodchild, Allyson; Butler, Cathal (Open University, 2020-07-01)
      This article examines the findings from a mixed methods research study exploring part- time students' perceptions of their transition into higher education. Drawing on wider research in the field of transition and utilising Gale and Parker's (2014) conceptual framework as a means of viewing the transition process, the article identifies how one group of part-time undergraduates experienced the process of becoming an undergraduate. The results highlight the importance of offering a well-framed early learning experience for students, which enables them to learn the skills needed for early academic success and provides continued support as they progress in their own time towards recognition of themselves as undergraduates. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that transition is not time bound, and individual students will need individual approaches. This will require institutions to consider how the support they offer can be tailored to a student's specific needs.
    • Busting the myth of gender bias: views from men and women primary-school trainees and teachers

      Mistry, Malini Tina; Sood, Krishan; University of Bedfordshire; Nottingham Trent University (Routledge, 2014-06-01)
      We explore the ideology associated with gender equality that despite primary schools and initial teacher education (ITE) institutions doing all they can to recruit men into primary education, a huge gender imbalance still exists. We frame our study around the notions of gender equality and professional responsibility. Using a multi-case study approach, this inquiry examined views of men and women from 12 English primary schools and one ITE institution regarding the cause and effect of gender bias. Findings show a differentially large gender gap in the sample schools and that there is good practice where schools are successful in attracting and retaining men teachers. Implications of these findings suggest that leaders in primary schools need to take a more active role to help change and shape the perceptions of men teachers in education. We conclude that leaders also need to help close the teacher gender gap in schools and ITE institutions through collaborative dialogue.
    • Can we fix education? living emancipatory pedagogy in Higher Education

      Clack, Jim (Taylor & Francis, 2019-12-26)
      This paper discusses a 12-week, 15-credit module taught to second year undergraduates during semester 2 of 2017–18 academic year. The module, entitled ‘Deschooling’, aimed to explore notions of emancipatory and critical pedagogy, control and coercion in the education system. Rather than ‘teach’ these concepts as abstract academic theory, I aimed to provide students with ‘lived’ experiences of them. That is, the aim was to provide a ‘deschooled’, ‘unoppressed’ experience for students by facilitating, so far as possible, democratic decision-making amongst the group. Subsequent reflection on the successes (or otherwise) of the module threw up numerous points. This paper reports on one particular aspect – assessment. As part of the module, students were offered choice over not only how they might be assessed, but also whether or not they should be assessed. This paper then discusses the challenges surrounding critical pedagogy in the HE classroom and considers implications for future practice.
    • The challenge of achieving transparency in undergraduate honours-level dissertation supervision

      Malcolm, Mary; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis (Routledge), 2020-06-11)
      The undergraduate honours-level dissertation is a significant component of many UK undergraduate programmes, as a key stage in the longer-term intellectual and career development of potential researchers and knowledge-workers, and also a critical contributor to immediate award outcome. This study aims to identify how dissertation supervisors balance and deliver on these expectations. Qualitative analysis of twenty interviews conducted with supervisors at two post-1992 UK universities identifies how supervisors construct supervision as a multi-stage process. Supervisors describe how their individual supervisory practices enable them to maintain initial control of the dissertation, to extend supervisee autonomy at a central stage, and to distance supervisors further from the written output at a final stage in the process. This study questions whether this approach is satisfactory either in an institutional context where the supervisor is also first marker of work they may have shaped substantially, or as a pedagogic approach to developing research skills.
    • Cinderella and other stories…an exploration of practitioners’ views on bringing further education out of the shadows

      Thompson, Carol; Hopkins, Neil (University of Verona, 2019-05-08)
      Further education (FE) has frequently been portrayed as «the Cinderella service» in relation to other phases; a «submerged space» operating below the surface and out of sight of mainstream educational policy in England. A contrasting view depicts a sector often considered a panacea for social concerns. FE is charged with supplying a skilled workforce and has been portrayed as a vehicle for enhancing economic development (DfEE 1998, Leitch 2006). Despite this it has repeatedly suffered funding cuts (Tickle 2014) alongside imposed political change. This research explores the stories of tutors and managers affected by managerial processes in English FE. The findings revealed the impact of corporatisation on leadership as well as on tutor and student agency and explored how professional collaboration enabled practitioners to challenge the prevailing systems-driven culture in ways which would help the sector step out of the shadows.