• A critical evaluation of recent progress in understanding the role of the research-teaching link in higher education

      Malcolm, Mary; University of Bedfordshire (Springer, 2014-03-01)
      Research into the relationship between research and teaching in higher education has flourished over several decades, and the most recent research phase has focused particularly on how the research-teaching nexus can enhance the quality and outcomes of the learning experience for both students and academics. On the basis of bibliographic review, this article concludes that progress in answering the fundamental questions posed by researchers in the early 1990s and earlier has been limited. Diverse practice has been categorised, shared and evaluated against broad criteria, while questions about the inherent nature and value of the nexus in higher education remain as yet unanswered within the research theme and within the broader consideration of higher education policy and practice. Recent research provides an enriched evidence base on which earlier questions of principle and policy might usefully be reconsidered.
    • Open Futures: an enquiry- and skills- based educational programme developed for primary education and its use in tertiary education

      Crabbe, M. James C.; Egan, Eamonn; O'Rorke, Lucy; Hadawi, Ali; University of Bedfordshire; Central Bedfordshire College (University of Bedfordshire, 2015-03)
      Open Futures is a transforming enquiry-based and skills-based system for education that is central to the curriculum, linking learning and life. It was developed to help children discover and develop practical skills, personal interests and values, which will contribute to their education and help to enhance their adult lives. Open Futures works in partnership with groups of schools in local clusters to develop a bespoke training programme, which extends the existing curriculum and nurtures independent learning through pupil-led approaches to personal learning. Schools benefit from the experience, knowledge and support of like-minded education professionals locally, nationally and internationally. Working with schools and their communities in the UK and India, Open Futures has been running with widespread success for 9 years. It now reaches more than 30,000 children in the UK. There is a body of independent evidence from primary and secondary education showing that both individual strands, as well as the complete Open Futures programme, significantly improve learner outcomes. We now wished to move Open Futures into the tertiary education sector. It was felt that an Open Futures approach to learning and teaching, particularly involving askit, would be beneficial to the community of learners at Central Bedfordshire Further Education College, rated Grade 2 by Ofsted in October 2013. Training has been in three areas so far: Construction, Public Services and Pathways (i.e. Learners with learning difficulties and disabilities). In all cases, there were significant positive impacts for learners and for teachers. As experience with Open Futures develops in the College, it should become clear how such a central enquiry-based and skills-based approach will help learners, and provide evidence for the use of Open Futures in tertiary education that could be used in other tertiary educational institutions.
    • Research mentoring in higher education in England

      Levesley, T.; Francis, R.; Castanheira, P.; Hobson, A.; Church, Andrew; Chrysalis Research UK Ltd (Chrysalis Research UK Ltd, 2015-10-26)
    • Te Kotahitanga : towards effective education reform for indigenous and other minoritised students

      Bishop, Russell; Berryman, Mere; Wearmouth, Janice (NZCER Press, 2014-06-18)
      The persistence of educational disparities that adversely affect indigenous and other minoritised students continues to be a major problem facing many nations. Principles of social justice and political imperatives at national level to address the detrimental impact of economically disengaged proportions of the population make this an issue that policy makers and educators in general should be aware of and look for ways to overcome. This book focuses on 'Te Kotahitanga', a theory-based, school-wide reform that operated in a number of mainstream secondary schools in New Zealand nand that has improved the educational experiences and achievement of Maori students. It began with the implementation of classroom pedagogy that is intended to respond to students' culture and to focus on positive teacher-student relationships. Case studies from three of the schools at Phase 3 in the project take the reader inside this reform that, in these schools, is supported by responsive and distributed leadership.