• How trainee physical education teachers in England write, use and evaluate lesson plans

      Capel, Susan; Bassett, Sophy; Lawrence, Julia; Newton, Angela; Zwozdiak-Myers, Paula; Brunel University; University of Bedfordshire; University of Hull (SAGE, 2018-07-19)
      Traditionally, all physical education initial teacher training (PEITT) courses in England, and in many other countries, require trainee teachers to complete detailed lesson plans for each lesson they teach in their school-based practicum and then to evaluate those lessons. However, there has been a limited amount of research on lesson planning in PEITT generally or in England specifically. The purpose of this study therefore was to gain an initial insight into how trainee physical education teachers write, use and evaluate lesson plans. Two-hundred-and-eighty-nine physical education trainees in England completed a questionnaire about lesson planning after finishing a block school-based practicum. Frequencies and percentages were calculated for the limited-choice questions on the questionnaires and open-ended questions were analysed using thematic analysis. Results showed mixed responses, with no one method followed by all trainees. Some trainees stated they planned and/or evaluated lessons as taught. Some stated they completed the plan and/or evaluation proforma to ‘tick a box’. The highest percentage of trainees stated it took between half an hour and one-and-a-half hours to plan each lesson. Although most trainees stated they found the plan useful in the lesson, others stated they found it too detailed to use. Some stated they did not deviate from the plan in the lesson, whereas others adapted the plan. The majority of trainees stated that evaluation enabled them to see if objectives had been achieved. Results are discussed in relation to teaching trainees how to plan lessons in PEITT in England.
    • Learning to teach physical education in the secondary school: a companion to school experience

      Capel, Susan; Whitehead, Margaret (Routledge, 2010-09-13)
      What skills are required of secondary student physical education teachers? What are the key areas that these student teachers need to understand? How can current challenges be addressed by these student teachers? Learning to Teach Physical Education in the Secondary School combines underpinning theory and knowledge with suggestions for practical application to support student physical education teachers in learning to teach. Based on research evidence, theory and knowledge relating to teaching and learning and written specifically with the student teacher in mind, the authors examine physical education in context. The book offers tasks and case studies designed to support student teachers in their school-based experiences and encourages reflection on practice and development. Masters level tasks and suggestions for further reading have been included throughout to support researching and writing about topics in more depth. This fully-updated third edition has been thoroughly revised to take into account changes in policy and practice within both initial teacher education and the National Curriculum for Physical Education. The book also contains a brand new chapter on the role of reflective teaching in developing expertise and improving the quality of pupil learning. Other key topics covered include; lesson planning, organisation and management; observation in physical education; developing and maintaining an effective learning environment; inclusive physical education; assessment; developing wider community links; using ICT to support teaching and learning in physical education. Learning to Teach Physical Education in the Secondary School is an invaluable resource for student physical education teachers.