• Understanding special educational needs and disabilities in the early years: principles and perspectives

      Wearmouth, Janice; Gosling, Abigail; Beams, Julie; Davydaitis, Stephanie (Routledge, 2017-09-18)
      This key text provides essential tools for understanding legislation, policy, provision and practice for children in the early years, particularly young children with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND). Based on extensive research and the four areas of need as defined in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice: 0 to 25 Years (DfE, 2015), the book charts the development of young children and their growing constructions of learning, communication, language, motor movement and emotion. Providing material that translates into practice in a straightforward and practical way, this text is packed full of personal accounts and case studies, enabling readers to appreciate what the experience of SEND in the early years means for families and professionals, and also to learn more about how they might understand and respond appropriately to a child’s needs.
    • Why are there still so few men within Early Years in primary schools: views from male trainee teachers and male leaders?

      Mistry, Malini Tina; Sood, Krishan (Routledge, 2013-01-29)
      One of the challenges facing the Early Years (EY) sector is how to encourage more male practitioners to counterbalance a largely feminised workforce. Using case studies of male trainees at different stages of their primary undergraduate Initial Teacher Training course at one university, we attempt to consider data why there is under-representation of men within the leadership strata in EY settings. Questionnaires and interviews were conducted with the male sample groups and male leaders in primary schools to gain an overview regarding gender stereotyping. Our findings suggest that male trainees enjoy working in the EY sector, but they need mentoring by strong leaders to help them overcome the perceived contextual barriers of male stereotypes in that setting. In conclusion, we consider some of these barriers of stereotypes, attitudes, values, beliefs existing and the actions needed in addressing such stereotypes if a long-lasting change is to happen.