• Assessment or referral tool: the unintended consequences of a dual purpose common assessment framework form

      Nethercott, Kathryn; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis, 2020-02-03)
      The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) was designed to facilitate early intervention through multi-agency working and the active involvement of families. The underlying principle was to move away from a risk-focused, needs-led or service-led culture to assess need and match needs to identified services. It was anticipated that services and assessments would become more evidence-based, and a common language between professionals and agencies would evolve. Taking a social constructionist approach this study explored professionals’ experiences of the use of the Common Assessment Framework form. Forty-one professionals from four different local authorities and a variety of agencies took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed utilizing thematic analysis. Findings suggest the unintended consequences of the use of the CAF were influenced by local authority policy. As the local authorities adopted the policy of utilizing the CAF as a referral mechanism, rather than to assess needs, profes-sionals unintentionally perceived the CAF form as a referral tool, to refer families to existing service provision. Further to this, professionals referred to the CAF form itself, as a ‘means to an end’, implying that this was a step that had to be overcome in order to access services.
    • Book review: How to be an outstanding nursery leader

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-20)
      Review of How to be an outstanding nursery leader by Allison Lee, 2018, London, Bloomsbury, 182 pp., £12.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978 1 4729 5257 8
    • Book review: School readiness and the characteristics of effective learning: the essential guide for Early Years practitioners

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-17)
      Book review of School readiness and the characteristics of effective learning: the essential guide for Early Years practitioners by Tamsin Grimmer, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018, 206 pp.,, £13.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978 1 78592-175-9
    • Book review: Using film to understand childhood and practice

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-17)
      Book review of Using film to understand childhood and practice edited by Sue Aitken, London, Bloomsbury, 2018, 235 pp., £18.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-4742-7455-5
    • Book review: Your booksmart, school- savvy, stress-busting primary teacher training companion

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2021-03-29)
      review of: Your booksmart, school- savvy, stress-busting primary teacher training companion by Elizabeth Malone, 2020, London, Sage, 178 pp., £16.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-5264-9419-1
    • Creating connections to weather the storm of marketisation

      Rainford, Jon (Taylor and Francis, 2020-04-17)
      Viewpoint
    • Education for democratic citizenship in Ireland

      Butler, Cathal (Taylor and Francis, 2019-12-17)
      This chapter explores the complex historical, political and religious context that frame discussions around citizenship and democracy within education in Ireland, as an independent nation, and as a member of the European Union. What it means to be a citizen in Ireland will be explored.The focus is primarily on the Republic of Ireland, though issues that arise in Northern Ireland will also be covered. The chapter will focus on curriculum subject areas that touch on citizenship and democracy, past and present. The extent to which policy and practice can map onto the key concepts set out in the Council of Europe's framework of competences for democratic culture will be explored, with a specific focus on the extent to which teachers are trained to be able to teach these subjects.
    • From the creation of a concept to the globalisation of physical literacy

      Whitehead, Margaret; Maude, Patricia (Taylor and Francis, 2016-10-10)
      The growth of ‘physical literacy’ from the insights gained from a PhD study to an internationally recognised concept is a remarkable journey. Advocacy developed from a small group of UK-based professionals, mainly in the field of physical education, to a larger group of colleagues in Europe, Canada and Australia. Physical literacy is now known in very many countries and is generating a re-examination of the goal of physical activity throughout the lifecourse. Interest has also spread to other professionals in related fields such as those in coaching and the leisure industry. That physical literacy has blossomed into a world-wide topic of interest would seem to indicate that the concept is making a timely contribution to the thinking in this area. Throughout this process Margaret Talbot has been unerringly supportive and her national and international advocacy has been highly significant throughout the course of this development. The chapter is divided into three Parts. Part one, ‘The beginnings’, will outline briefly the research which formed the foundation of physical literacy and this will be put into context by setting out what was perceived as the general attitude to physical education and physical activity at the turn of the century. Also included will be mention of some of the projects and programmes that were created at this time, in many ways mirroring the developments concerning physical literacy. Part two is entitled ‘Developmental milestones since 2009’. In the main this will be presented in a series of sections showing the range of activity that developed from the initial interest in the work, namely publications, conferences and the establishment of the International Physical Literacy Association (IPLA). An example of research into an aspect of physical literacy is also outlined here, as well as a diagram setting out examples of Margaret Talbot’s advocacy in her various positions of responsibility. The final Part, ‘Current challenges and future plans’, looks at the challenges facing the International Physical Literacy Association and a sample of future plans.
    • The magic of mentoring: a democratic approach to mentoring trainee teachers in post-compulsory education

      Thompson, Carol; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis, 2016-08-05)
      This paper explores the impact of subject-specific mentoring within post-compulsory education. Using questionnaires and semistructured interviews, it considers those factors considered ‘most useful’ to teachers in training. The findings suggest that, contrary to the views espoused by bodies such as the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills, mentors have a limited impact on the effectiveness of teacher education. Reasons for this are examined, including the context in which most trainees and mentors work as well as the restrictions created by initial teacher education frameworks. A more productive approach to supporting postcompulsory education trainees is explored through the development of a collaborative and democratic model of mentoring.
    • Part-time students in transition: supporting a successful start to higher education

      Goodchild, Allyson; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis, 2017-12-21)
      The transition into higher education is a critical time for all students. A positive early experience provides a strong foundation for future academic success whilst a negative experience can be destabilising for a new learner. To date, research has primarily focused on full-time undergraduates in order to explain the reasons for high attrition rates at the end of the first year. Less is known about the experiences of part-time undergraduates despite the fact that they make up over one quarter of the total student population (HESA, 2015). This article reports on a study to investigate the initial experiences of a group of part-time undergraduates who have chosen to undertake a degree at a small study centre run by one university. Using a mixed methods research approach, the research captured the lived reality of the experience and identified the contributing and negating factors that can influence a successful transition. Perceptions of the level and type of support provided for students during transition were gained from both staff and students. The findings confirm a heterogeneous group. Despite being highly motivated, the early transition period was generally characterised by a sense of trepidation and self-doubt as students took their first steps in higher education. The research highlights the complexity of the initial decision-making process for part-time students and the barriers they face. It concludes that a flexible but unified approach, involving tutors and the wider support services, is needed, as unique students require unique responses to their transition needs.
    • Research ethics and participatory research in an interdisciplinary technology-enhanced learning project

      Tracy, Frances; Carmichael, Patrick (Taylor and Francis, 2013-01-01)
      This account identifies some of the tensions that became apparent in a large interdisciplinary technology-enhanced learning project as its members attempted to maintain their commitment to responsive, participatory research and development in naturalistic research settings while also ‘enacting’ these commitments in formal research review processes. It discusses how these review processes were accompanied by a commitment to continuing discussion and elaboration across an extended research team and to a view of ethical practice as an aspect of phronesis or ‘practical wisdom’ which demands understanding of specific situations and reference to prior experience. In this respect the interdisciplinary nature of the project allows the diverse experience of the project team to be brought into play, with ethical issues a joint point of focus for continuing interdisciplinary discourse
    • Response to chapter 2: Educating Rita today

      Goodwyn, Andrew (Taylor and Francis, 2019-09-06)
      In this response to Corley’s chapter on Educating Rita, the author considers elements that have contributed to the endurance of Russell’s play over the last 40 years. Acknowledging the importance of Corley’s focus on the mentor-mentee relationship, Goodwyn also considers how audiences have responded to the wide-ranging humor of the play, the relationship between student and teacher and the realistic connections to the UK’s Open University system.
    • Review of Working together for children: a critical introduction to multi-agency working

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2018-10-10)
      Book review of Working together for children: a critical introduction to multi-agency working, Gary Walker, Continuum, 2008, 9780826498175
    • Review of: Building systems that work for young children: international insights from innovative early childhood systems

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2021-07-16)
      Book review of: Building systems that work for young children: international insights from innovative early childhood systems, edited by Sharon Lynn Kagan, 2019, Columbia University: Teachers College Press, Columbia University, 248 pp., £24.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-0-8077-6129-8
    • Seeing through the eyes of a teacher: differences in perceptions of HE teaching in face-to-face and digital contexts

      Jensen, Lise; Price, Linda; Roxå, Torgny; Lund University; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis, 2019-11-13)
      Studies of how contextual factors influence teachers’ approaches to teaching have chiefly focused on face-to-face teaching in physical campus contexts. This study advances understanding of how applicable this knowledge is in digital contexts. The study explores how university teachers perceive the differences between teaching in physical campus contexts and the digital teaching contexts found in online courses. Interview data were collected from 15 university teachers and analysed using thematic analysis. The results show that respondents perceived digital teaching contexts to be changeable. Changes were attributed to technology development and influences from students and teachers. The respondents varied in how close or anonymous they perceived their online students to be compared to their campus students. The variation was related to the type of teaching-learning activities prioritised by the respondents. However, no relationships were found between respondents’ perceptions of their student-teacher relationship and class size, time invested, or type of communication.
    • A voice for advancing the profession of teaching?

      Goodwyn, Andrew (Taylor and Francis, 2019-03-14)
      This chapter tells the story of the Advanced Skills Teachers (AST), drawing on extensive research data with ASTs themselves, Local Authority AST coordinators and a range of Senior School Leaders. It provides the experience of ASTs, their passion for teaching and learning, and their anger and disappointment at the summary abolition of their hard-earned status. The chapter explores Head Teachers and others who were equally concerned about the peremptory policy change. It examines the need to overcome the empty rhetoric of politicians who make much noise about ‘world class teachers’ but do nothing to develop the profession to achieve such a level. The chapter addresses the narrow prejudice of the media who often deride the models as ‘Super Teachers’. The chapter concludes with a new conceptual framework emphasising the nature of the ‘voice’ that leading teachers can offer the profession as a whole.