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dc.contributor.authorSpeight, J.en
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, Alan J.en
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, J. L.en
dc.contributor.authorWoodcock, A.en
dc.contributor.authorBradley, C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T11:09:12Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-14T11:09:12Zen
dc.date.issued2013-01en
dc.identifier.citationSpeight, J.., Sinclair, A. J., Browne, J. L., Woodcock, A., Bradley, C. (2013) 'Assessing the impact of diabetes on the quality of life of older adults living in a care home: validation of the ADDQoL Senior' Diabetic Medicine 30 (1):74en
dc.identifier.issn0742-3071en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03748.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/593438en
dc.description.abstractAims  Around a quarter of UK care-home residents have diabetes. Diabetes is known to impact quality of life but existing diabetes-specific quality of life measures are unsuitable for elderly care-home residents. We aimed to develop and evaluate a new measure for use with older adults, to be particularly suitable for use with care-home residents: the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL) Senior*. Methods  Content and format changes were made to the 19-domain ADDQoL, informed by related measures for people with visual impairments (12 domain-specific items were retained, four items were revised/added and three items were removed). This revision was modified further following cognitive debriefing interviews with three older adults living in a care home. Psychometric evaluation of the newly developed 17-domain ADDQoL Senior was conducted using data from 90 care-home residents with diabetes who took part in a broader intervention study. Results  The life domains most impacted by diabetes were ‘independence’ and ‘freedom to eat as I wish’. The ADDQoL Senior demonstrated good factor structure and internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.924). Domain scores were, as expected, significantly intercorrelated. Conclusions  The ADDQoL Senior measures the perceived impact of diabetes on quality of life in older adults, and has been found to be suitable for those living in care homes if administered by interview. The scale has demonstrated acceptability and excellent psychometric properties. It is anticipated that the number of items may be reduced in the future if our current findings can be replicated.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2012.03748.xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Diabetic Medicineen
dc.subjectdiabetesen
dc.subjectolder adultsen
dc.subjectelderlyen
dc.titleAssessing the impact of diabetes on the quality of life of older adults living in a care home: validation of the ADDQoL Senioren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAustralian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetesen
dc.contributor.departmentDeakin Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentAHP Researchen
dc.contributor.departmentBedfordshire and Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical Schoolen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal Holloway, University of Londonen
dc.identifier.journalDiabetic Medicineen
html.description.abstractAims  Around a quarter of UK care-home residents have diabetes. Diabetes is known to impact quality of life but existing diabetes-specific quality of life measures are unsuitable for elderly care-home residents. We aimed to develop and evaluate a new measure for use with older adults, to be particularly suitable for use with care-home residents: the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL) Senior*. Methods  Content and format changes were made to the 19-domain ADDQoL, informed by related measures for people with visual impairments (12 domain-specific items were retained, four items were revised/added and three items were removed). This revision was modified further following cognitive debriefing interviews with three older adults living in a care home. Psychometric evaluation of the newly developed 17-domain ADDQoL Senior was conducted using data from 90 care-home residents with diabetes who took part in a broader intervention study. Results  The life domains most impacted by diabetes were ‘independence’ and ‘freedom to eat as I wish’. The ADDQoL Senior demonstrated good factor structure and internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.924). Domain scores were, as expected, significantly intercorrelated. Conclusions  The ADDQoL Senior measures the perceived impact of diabetes on quality of life in older adults, and has been found to be suitable for those living in care homes if administered by interview. The scale has demonstrated acceptability and excellent psychometric properties. It is anticipated that the number of items may be reduced in the future if our current findings can be replicated.


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