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dc.contributor.authorDouse, Louise Emmaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-11T08:56:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-11T08:56:12Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationDouse, L. (2015) ‘Technological cognitive embodiment and the digital ‘other’’, in Maragiannis, A. (Eds.) Final Paper /Proceedings of the Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts conference, DRHA2014, London.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781326388584en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/577092en
dc.description.abstractThis paper extends on Don Ihde’s theories of human/ technology relations in order to clarify the affective interactive experience of self with ‘other’ as mediated by technology. It offers a new conceptualization of world, technology and other within digital performance research. The paper argues that technologies such as motion capture can be utilised in the storing and representing of embodied cognitive skills as in dance improvisation, in which knowledge in the body is articulated through motor skill. This ability to store and manipulate enables interaction with the world, and thus with an ‘other’ via a digital double.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.drha2014.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/LOW_res_final_paper_proceedings_drha2014.pdfen
dc.subjectembodimenten
dc.subjecttechnologyen
dc.subjectdigital otheren
dc.subjectIhdeen
dc.subjecthermeneuticsen
dc.subjectmotion captureen
dc.subjectDon Ihdeen
dc.subjecthuman computer interactionen
dc.titleTechnological cognitive embodiment and the digital ‘other’en
dc.typeConference papers, meetings and proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
html.description.abstractThis paper extends on Don Ihde’s theories of human/ technology relations in order to clarify the affective interactive experience of self with ‘other’ as mediated by technology. It offers a new conceptualization of world, technology and other within digital performance research. The paper argues that technologies such as motion capture can be utilised in the storing and representing of embodied cognitive skills as in dance improvisation, in which knowledge in the body is articulated through motor skill. This ability to store and manipulate enables interaction with the world, and thus with an ‘other’ via a digital double.


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  • Centre for Applied Research in Dance
    Dance at Bedford has an international reputation in research in the area of dance and technology. CARD supports and promotes excellence in research in e-dance and knowledge transfer between the academic and professional domains within the subject.

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