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dc.contributor.authorPapadopoulos, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorAli, Nasreenen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-21T13:21:45Z
dc.date.available2014-11-21T13:21:45Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.identifier.citationPapadopoulos, C. & Ali, N. (2013) 'Stress levels and their risk/protective factors among MSc public health students', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 3 (2), pp.5-10.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/335925
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing evidence that university students are particularly susceptible to feelings of stress. Given that many post-graduate healthcare students work with patients, the negative outcomes associated with feelings of stress may also impact upon the patient population. This study investigated the prevalence and risk/ protective factors of self-perceived stress among 43 international public health post-graduate students. Results revealed that almost all participants scored in either the moderate or high stress level category, with South-Asian students scoring particularly high stress scores. Headache frequency, sleep duration and feeling the need for a holiday were the explanatory variables most strongly associated with stress. The results support and add to previous literature which suggests that international students are particularly susceptible to feelings of stress. Suggestions on the management and prevention of stress are proposed, while ideas for future research to build upon this study's findings are considered.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-3-issue-2/stress-levels-and-their-riskprotective-factors-among-msc-public-health-studentsen
dc.subjectstressen
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.subjectpostgraduateen
dc.subjectpublic health studentsen
dc.titleStress levels and their risk/protective factors among MSc Public Health studentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
html.description.abstractThere is increasing evidence that university students are particularly susceptible to feelings of stress. Given that many post-graduate healthcare students work with patients, the negative outcomes associated with feelings of stress may also impact upon the patient population. This study investigated the prevalence and risk/ protective factors of self-perceived stress among 43 international public health post-graduate students. Results revealed that almost all participants scored in either the moderate or high stress level category, with South-Asian students scoring particularly high stress scores. Headache frequency, sleep duration and feeling the need for a holiday were the explanatory variables most strongly associated with stress. The results support and add to previous literature which suggests that international students are particularly susceptible to feelings of stress. Suggestions on the management and prevention of stress are proposed, while ideas for future research to build upon this study's findings are considered.


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