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dc.contributor.authorColeburn, Claire L.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Lindaen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-20T12:20:39Z
dc.date.available2014-11-20T12:20:39Z
dc.date.issued2014-11
dc.identifier.citationColeburn, C.L., Jones, L. (2014) 'Preventing too little too late: a novel process of continuous curriculum evaluation' Journal of pedagogic development, 4 (3)en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/335881
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed in response to the implementation of the UK’s first Critical Care Fellowship in Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart). The curriculum is a two-year, mentored, self-directed learning process enrolling one senior trainee annually. This expansive, situated apprenticeship was designed and implemented by the first author and members of the Cardiology department. This paper presents a novel evaluation process as applied to an emergent curriculum designed for a highly specific and mainly self-directed programme. We argue that whilst this case study describes a highly specialised tool applied in unique circumstances, the principles that emerge are applicable to emergent curricula being tested in other specialist post-graduate programmes. Evaluation methods are often post-hoc processes. We report on the power and potential for a cyclical action-reflection evaluation tool to maintain a novel self-directed postgraduate medical curriculum. We adapted the qualitative process of ‘Distance Travelled Analysis’ (DTA) from vocational education to construct an evaluation tool, which was used to collect the primary data from the Echo Fellow (singleton user of this unique curriculum) repeatedly over a five-month period. The quality and trustworthiness of the subjective primary dataset was triangulated using a variety of techniques including reflective conversations, spontaneous positive storytelling, face-to-face questionnaires and peer assessment. DTA successfully translated onto the study curriculum, offering purposeful and active evaluation. The tool was able to identify a critical incident and alerted stakeholders to negative change allowing contemporaneous rather than post-hoc action. An unexpected finding was that the DTA evaluation tool significantly impacted on both learner and tutor, creating active learning exchange. The study findings expose the importance of reflective conversation as a balancing component of DTA. This qualitative case study lends weight to the potential for continuous evaluation in high stakes curricula. While evaluation may bring to mind a post-hoc assessment of usefulness, we aim to help catalyse a paradigm shift towards a broader concept of evaluation as a tool for ongoing management of a curriculum. The process of DTA could offer curriculum evaluators an agile alternative to traditional retrospective methods, preventing evaluation from being ‘too little, too late’.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 4en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 3en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-4-issue-3/preventing-too-little-too-late-a-novel-process-of-continuous-curriculum-evaluationen
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectcurriuculum evaluationen
dc.subjectcontinuous curriculum evaluationen
dc.titlePreventing too little too late: a novel process of continuous curriculum evaluationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentOxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trusten
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
html.description.abstractThis study was designed in response to the implementation of the UK’s first Critical Care Fellowship in Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart). The curriculum is a two-year, mentored, self-directed learning process enrolling one senior trainee annually. This expansive, situated apprenticeship was designed and implemented by the first author and members of the Cardiology department. This paper presents a novel evaluation process as applied to an emergent curriculum designed for a highly specific and mainly self-directed programme. We argue that whilst this case study describes a highly specialised tool applied in unique circumstances, the principles that emerge are applicable to emergent curricula being tested in other specialist post-graduate programmes. Evaluation methods are often post-hoc processes. We report on the power and potential for a cyclical action-reflection evaluation tool to maintain a novel self-directed postgraduate medical curriculum. We adapted the qualitative process of ‘Distance Travelled Analysis’ (DTA) from vocational education to construct an evaluation tool, which was used to collect the primary data from the Echo Fellow (singleton user of this unique curriculum) repeatedly over a five-month period. The quality and trustworthiness of the subjective primary dataset was triangulated using a variety of techniques including reflective conversations, spontaneous positive storytelling, face-to-face questionnaires and peer assessment. DTA successfully translated onto the study curriculum, offering purposeful and active evaluation. The tool was able to identify a critical incident and alerted stakeholders to negative change allowing contemporaneous rather than post-hoc action. An unexpected finding was that the DTA evaluation tool significantly impacted on both learner and tutor, creating active learning exchange. The study findings expose the importance of reflective conversation as a balancing component of DTA. This qualitative case study lends weight to the potential for continuous evaluation in high stakes curricula. While evaluation may bring to mind a post-hoc assessment of usefulness, we aim to help catalyse a paradigm shift towards a broader concept of evaluation as a tool for ongoing management of a curriculum. The process of DTA could offer curriculum evaluators an agile alternative to traditional retrospective methods, preventing evaluation from being ‘too little, too late’.


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