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dc.contributor.authorOchieng, Berthaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-18T12:55:41Z
dc.date.available2013-06-18T12:55:41Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationOchieng, B.M.N. (2010) 'You Know What I Mean:' The ethical and methodological dilemmas and challenges for black researchers interviewing black families', Qualitative Health Research, 20(12),pp.1725-1735.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1049-7323
dc.identifier.issn1552-7557
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1049732310381085
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294166
dc.description.abstractIn this article the author provides a reflexive account of my research experiences with families of African descent. She examines the ways in which, as a researcher of African descent, she became part of the research process. Using data from an ethnographic study that explored the healthy lifestyle experiences and attitudes of families and adolescents of African descent in the northwest of England, she presents a detailed discussion of the identity alteration, researcher–researched relationships, and insider–outsider tensions and dilemmas that arose while she collected data. The author argues that researchers working with participants with whom they share similar ethnicity and historical experiences are likely to find that their professional self and personal life experiences overlap, and there can be difficulties in keeping them separate.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Journalsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://qhr.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1049732310381085en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Qualitative Health Researchen_GB
dc.subjectadolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectethnographyen_GB
dc.subjectfamiliesen_GB
dc.subjectyouthen_GB
dc.subjectresearch methodsen_GB
dc.subjectresearch ethicsen_GB
dc.title"You know what I mean:" the ethical and methodological dilemmas and challenges for black researchers interviewing black familiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalQualitative Health Researchen_GB
html.description.abstractIn this article the author provides a reflexive account of my research experiences with families of African descent. She examines the ways in which, as a researcher of African descent, she became part of the research process. Using data from an ethnographic study that explored the healthy lifestyle experiences and attitudes of families and adolescents of African descent in the northwest of England, she presents a detailed discussion of the identity alteration, researcher–researched relationships, and insider–outsider tensions and dilemmas that arose while she collected data. The author argues that researchers working with participants with whom they share similar ethnicity and historical experiences are likely to find that their professional self and personal life experiences overlap, and there can be difficulties in keeping them separate.


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