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dc.contributor.authorFrench, Timen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOpatola, Kayodeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-07T19:08:24Z
dc.date.available2013-04-07T19:08:24Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationFrench, T. and Opatola, K. (2010) 'A pilot Investigation of E-Banking trust perceptions amongst the Yoruba and Igbo of Nigeria', Procs IWIPS 2010: pp. 107-116.en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn0972218483
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/279216
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports a pilot study designed to probe B2C (Business to Consumer) consumer trust perceptions across sub-cultural boundaries. More specifically, two low fidelity B2C (Business to Consumer) web-sites have been designed to "probe" (i.e. reveal intangible trust requirements) as they specifically relate to membership of two sub-cultural groups within Nigeria in the context of E-banking. The results of the study reveal that the two groups (Yoruba and Igbo) differentially de-coded visual cues embedded within seven exemplar E-Banking sites. Further, this decoding reflected local cultural norms. We have consciously avoided any post-hoc mapping of Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Rather, our experimental method relies on a comparison of self-generated personal constructs, elicited from subjects in response to the stimuli materials (home-page "cards") presented to the subjects.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherProduct & Systems Internationalisation, Inc.en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.iwips.org/proceedings/2010/papers/a_pilot_investigation_of_e_banking_trust_perceptions_amongst_the_yoruba_and_igbo_of_nigeria/en_GB
dc.titleA pilot investigation of e-banking trust perceptions amongst the Yoruba and Igbo of Nigeriaen
dc.typeConference papers, meetings and proceedingsen
html.description.abstractThis paper reports a pilot study designed to probe B2C (Business to Consumer) consumer trust perceptions across sub-cultural boundaries. More specifically, two low fidelity B2C (Business to Consumer) web-sites have been designed to "probe" (i.e. reveal intangible trust requirements) as they specifically relate to membership of two sub-cultural groups within Nigeria in the context of E-banking. The results of the study reveal that the two groups (Yoruba and Igbo) differentially de-coded visual cues embedded within seven exemplar E-Banking sites. Further, this decoding reflected local cultural norms. We have consciously avoided any post-hoc mapping of Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Rather, our experimental method relies on a comparison of self-generated personal constructs, elicited from subjects in response to the stimuli materials (home-page "cards") presented to the subjects.


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