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dc.contributor.authorPalmateer, Norahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Niallen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWadd, Sarahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Avrilen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Daviden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-02T15:13:46Zen
dc.date.available2012-11-02T15:13:46Zen
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationPalmateer, N. et al (2008) 'Exploring associations between perceived HCV status and injecting risk behaviors among recent initiates to injecting drug use in Glasgow' Subst Use Misuse 43 (3-4):375-88en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1082-6084en
dc.identifier.pmid18365938en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10826080701202908en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/250851en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to explore the influence of testing for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and perceived HCV status on injecting risk behavior. A cross-sectional, community-wide survey was undertaken at multiple sites throughout Greater Glasgow during 2001-2002. Four hundred ninety-seven injecting drug users (IDUs) consented to participate and were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to ascertain HCV test history and injecting risk behavior. The average age of participants was 27 years and the majority of the sample were male (70.4%). Participants had been injecting for an average duration of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed no significant associations between having been tested and injecting risk behavior. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, HCV-negatives were significantly less likely to borrow needles/syringes and spoons or filters as compared with unawares and were significantly less likely to borrow spoons or filters as compared with HCV-positives. Due to the cross-sectional design of the study, it is uncertain whether this reduction in risk behavior could be attributed to perception of HCV status. Further research is recommended to consolidate the evidence for this relationship.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18365938en_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Healthen
dc.subject.meshCatchment Area (Health)en
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEnglanden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren
dc.subject.meshHepatitis Cen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshRisk-Takingen
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen
dc.subject.meshSubstance Abuse, Intravenousen
dc.titleExploring associations between perceived HCV status and injecting risk behaviors among recent initiates to injecting drug use in Glasgowen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Protection Scotlanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalSubstance use & misuseen_GB
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to explore the influence of testing for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and perceived HCV status on injecting risk behavior. A cross-sectional, community-wide survey was undertaken at multiple sites throughout Greater Glasgow during 2001-2002. Four hundred ninety-seven injecting drug users (IDUs) consented to participate and were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to ascertain HCV test history and injecting risk behavior. The average age of participants was 27 years and the majority of the sample were male (70.4%). Participants had been injecting for an average duration of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed no significant associations between having been tested and injecting risk behavior. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, HCV-negatives were significantly less likely to borrow needles/syringes and spoons or filters as compared with unawares and were significantly less likely to borrow spoons or filters as compared with HCV-positives. Due to the cross-sectional design of the study, it is uncertain whether this reduction in risk behavior could be attributed to perception of HCV status. Further research is recommended to consolidate the evidence for this relationship.


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