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dc.contributor.authorSmits, Evelien L.J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Cindyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHardwick, Nicola R.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Suzanne E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorVan Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorOrchard, Kim H.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuinn, Barbara-Annen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-18T10:44:52Z
dc.date.available2012-05-18T10:44:52Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.identifier.citationSmits, E.L.J., Lee, C., Hardwick, N., Brooks, S.E., Van Tendeloo, V.F.I., Orchard, K., Guinn, B.A. (2011) 'Clinical evaluation of cellular immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukaemia' Cancer immunology, immunotherapy, 60 (6):757-69en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-0851
dc.identifier.pmid21519825
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00262-011-1022-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/224580
dc.description.abstractImmunotherapy is currently under active investigation as an adjuvant therapy to improve the overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) by eliminating residual leukaemic cells following standard therapy. The graft-versus-leukaemia effect observed following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has already demonstrated the significant role of immune cells in controlling AML, paving the way to further exploitation of this effect in optimized immunotherapy protocols. In this review, we discuss the current state of cellular immunotherapy as adjuvant therapy for AML, with a particular focus on new strategies and recently published results of preclinical and clinical studies. Therapeutic vaccines that are being tested in AML include whole tumour cells as an autologous source of multiple leukaemia-associated antigens (LAA) and autologous dendritic cells loaded with LAA as effective antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T cells or natural killer cells is under active investigation. Results from phase I and II trials are promising and support further investigation into the potential of cellular immunotherapeutic strategies to prevent or fight relapse in AML patients.
dc.description.sponsorshipLeukaemia and Lymphoma Research, Cancer Research U.K.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringerLinken_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/r12815u123n7x320/?MUD=MPen_GB
dc.subjectacute myeloid leukaemiaen_GB
dc.subjectclinical immunotherapyen_GB
dc.subjectclinical trialsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy, Adoptive
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myeloid, Acute
dc.titleClinical evaluation of cellular immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukaemia.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Antwerpen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCancer immunology, immunotherapy : CIIen_GB
html.description.abstractImmunotherapy is currently under active investigation as an adjuvant therapy to improve the overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) by eliminating residual leukaemic cells following standard therapy. The graft-versus-leukaemia effect observed following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has already demonstrated the significant role of immune cells in controlling AML, paving the way to further exploitation of this effect in optimized immunotherapy protocols. In this review, we discuss the current state of cellular immunotherapy as adjuvant therapy for AML, with a particular focus on new strategies and recently published results of preclinical and clinical studies. Therapeutic vaccines that are being tested in AML include whole tumour cells as an autologous source of multiple leukaemia-associated antigens (LAA) and autologous dendritic cells loaded with LAA as effective antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T cells or natural killer cells is under active investigation. Results from phase I and II trials are promising and support further investigation into the potential of cellular immunotherapeutic strategies to prevent or fight relapse in AML patients.


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