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dc.contributor.authorPhilpott, Ellyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeaumont-Kerridge, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-15T10:35:18Zen
dc.date.available2012-05-15T10:35:18Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.isbn9781605667904en
dc.identifier.doi10.4018/978-1-60566-790-4.ch016en
dc.identifier.doi10.4018/978-1-60566-790-4.ch016en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/223791en
dc.description.abstractThis chapter argues the case for a proactive process to facilitate knowledge creation between universities and small to medium size enterprises (SMEs). Cultural issues dictating reticence of engagement are discussed as well as the inhibitors that prevent the free interchange of knowledge. The chapter shows how reticence can be overcome by serving the needs of both parties and how knowledge created through successful interaction can be measured. The knowledge creation process itself is analysed in the context of Nonaka’s SECI model. The chapter concludes with recommendations for the reader on areas for public investment to enhance the knowledge transfer process and provides lessons learned for the measurement of knowledge transfer at these interfaces. The outcomes are of value to those interested in the continuing applicability of Nonaka’s work outside of the heavy industrial context as well as to those interested in the traditional problems associated with knowledge transfer between universities and SMEs.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIGI Globalen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.igi-global.com/chapter/overcoming-reticence-aid-knowledge-creation/36674en
dc.subjectknowledge sharingen
dc.subjectknowledge creationen
dc.titleOvercoming reticence to aid knowledge creation between universities and business - a case revieweden
dc.title.alternativeCultural implications of knowledge sharing, management and transfer : identifying competitive advantageen_GB
dc.typeBook chapteren
html.description.abstractThis chapter argues the case for a proactive process to facilitate knowledge creation between universities and small to medium size enterprises (SMEs). Cultural issues dictating reticence of engagement are discussed as well as the inhibitors that prevent the free interchange of knowledge. The chapter shows how reticence can be overcome by serving the needs of both parties and how knowledge created through successful interaction can be measured. The knowledge creation process itself is analysed in the context of Nonaka’s SECI model. The chapter concludes with recommendations for the reader on areas for public investment to enhance the knowledge transfer process and provides lessons learned for the measurement of knowledge transfer at these interfaces. The outcomes are of value to those interested in the continuing applicability of Nonaka’s work outside of the heavy industrial context as well as to those interested in the traditional problems associated with knowledge transfer between universities and SMEs.


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