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dc.contributor.authorDanbury, Annie Hagenen
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T10:22:07Z
dc.date.available2011-06-17T10:22:07Z
dc.date.issued2007-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/133571
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the University of Bedfordshireen
dc.description.abstractThis research investigated the role of felt involvement in processing advertising messages by means of a 3x2 factorial experiment with control. The experiment was designed to examine the effects of advertising exposure on the decoding process with a risk and pleasure treatment for three product categories. Overall, results from 583 respondents provide strong support for the influence of affective components of involvement in the evaluation of advertising information in both high and medium involvement situations. Specifically, risk and pleasure antecedents were examined to determine their relative impact on involvement, information processing, and outcomes of the decoding process in terms of recall and attitudes to the advertisement. The involvement construct was found to be relatively stable, but the affective antecedents, pleasure and sign, influenced the decoding process and its outcomes after advertising exposure. Evidence from this research suggests that cognitive processing of advertising messages is simpler than has been assumed in the advertising and consumer behaviour literature to date as information processing is driven predominantly by affect. Pleasure appeals were also found to be particularly effective across product categories. Purchase risk was perceived to be very low or non-existent at the time of advertising exposure. Insight into the underlying processes that influence the decoding of advertising is also provided. This suggests that advertising situations are specific and based on the relative importance of the product, the nature of involvement, advertising appeal, user status, proximity of the next purchase, attitude to advertising and potentially gender identification.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.subjectadvertisingen
dc.subjectinformation processingen
dc.subjectN561 Advertisingen
dc.titleAn analysis of the involvement construct in the information processing of advertising messagesen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bedfordshireen
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-11T16:52:56Z
html.description.abstractThis research investigated the role of felt involvement in processing advertising messages by means of a 3x2 factorial experiment with control. The experiment was designed to examine the effects of advertising exposure on the decoding process with a risk and pleasure treatment for three product categories. Overall, results from 583 respondents provide strong support for the influence of affective components of involvement in the evaluation of advertising information in both high and medium involvement situations. Specifically, risk and pleasure antecedents were examined to determine their relative impact on involvement, information processing, and outcomes of the decoding process in terms of recall and attitudes to the advertisement. The involvement construct was found to be relatively stable, but the affective antecedents, pleasure and sign, influenced the decoding process and its outcomes after advertising exposure. Evidence from this research suggests that cognitive processing of advertising messages is simpler than has been assumed in the advertising and consumer behaviour literature to date as information processing is driven predominantly by affect. Pleasure appeals were also found to be particularly effective across product categories. Purchase risk was perceived to be very low or non-existent at the time of advertising exposure. Insight into the underlying processes that influence the decoding of advertising is also provided. This suggests that advertising situations are specific and based on the relative importance of the product, the nature of involvement, advertising appeal, user status, proximity of the next purchase, attitude to advertising and potentially gender identification.


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