• Factors affecting employees’ organisational commitment for sustainability compliance in major UK food retailers

      Abro, Muhammad Tariq (University of BedfordshireUniversity of Bedfordshire, 2016-07-21)
      Organisations have strategies and goals to run their businesses smoothly, but in most cases, their strategies are not appropriately implemented leading to non-achievement of their goals. Strategies require the support of individuals within an organisation to achieve organisational goals. The literature has illustrated some examples where employees at middle management and operational levels, are seen as important in achieving the organisational goals that are planned at the strategic level. Employees at middle management and operational levels are considered the most significant for compliance with organisational sustainability strategies. Compliance with sustainability strategy in food retailers is interdependent; an individual’s commitment and performance can affect other members’ performance or endanger the entire sustainability strategy, as every individual is indispensable. This study examines the factors affecting employees’ organisational commitment for compliance of sustainability and food safety strategy in major UK food retailers. This thesis aimed to develop a research model about sustainability compliance through employees’ organisational commitment. It examined the influencing factors, such as moral hazards, goal conflict, information asymmetry, information sharing, trust, incentives, and CSR practices. Also, it explained how these factors influence employees’ organisational commitment which leads to environmental and food strategy compliance. The current study is based on the empirical data collected from two major food retailers in the UK. Also, it identified the relationships and their influence on employees’ organisational commitment. These factors are drawn from a proposed model, and eight hypotheses were developed for investigation. Results suggested that employees’ organisational commitment can influence and has a significant positive relationship with sustainability compliance; furthermore, it emerged as indispensable for sustainability compliance. This study has implications and recommendations for the food retailers, particularly Tesco and Sainsbury to enhance employees’ commitment to achieving their sustainability goals. The above considerations are reflected in the following objectives: 1. To examine the factors and their impact on employees organisational commitment in major UK food retailers. 2. To establish a relationship between the factors and compliance as suggested in the proposed model and related hypotheses. 3. To offer significant findings and implications for research and practice regarding sustainability and food safety strategy compliance in major UK food retailers. 4. To develop a model of sustainability and food safety strategy compliance in major UK food retailers. Based on previous research and agency theory, eight hypotheses are developed and tested in this thesis using a quantitative approach. A questionnaire is developed and sent out to 405 employees of Tesco and Sainsbury’s; 198 responses were received. Partial Least Squares – Structural Equation Modelling is used for hypothesis testing. The study results support seven out of eight hypothesised relationships. Supported hypotheses are; goal conflict has a negative relationship with employees’ organisational commitment. Information asymmetry has a negative relationship with employees’ organisational commitment. Information sharing has a positive relationship with employees’ organisational commitment. Trust has a positive relationship with employees’ organisational commitment. Incentives have a positive relationship with employees’ organisational commitment. CSR practices have a positive relationship with employees’ organisational commitment. Organisational commitment has a positive relationship with the compliance of strategic sustainability strategy. However, a negative relationship of moral hazards having with employees’ organisational commitment is unsupported. Furthermore, the results suggest that employees’ organisational commitment can influence and has a significant positive relationship with sustainability compliance. Possible explanations of the hypotheses are discussed in the results. This study examines sustainability compliance empirically. This research provided a model based on the empirical evidence which is an addition to the existing literature. It provides a rare example of an investigation that incorporates commitment for compliance of sustainability and food safety strategies with the use of agency theory. This study used PLS-SEM that has the potential to test the relationships in a complex model. Also, it provides guidance to the focused organisation related in the areas such as hygiene food handling, job satisfaction, incentives, information sharing for enhancing employees’ organisational commitment for sustainability compliance. The findings can be useful for others in the food sectors and in food-related environments. Keywords: Influencing factors, sustainability compliance, CSR, food retailers and employees’ organisational commitment.