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  • Organising for women's emancipation: challenges and pitfalls

    Schwabenland, Christina; Lange, Chris; Onyx, Jenny (Deutsches Zentralinstitut für soziale Fragen, 2020-08-31)
    The oppression and devaluing of women is a significant problem all over the. world. Exploring forms of gender oppression as well as different kinds of responses by civil society organisations is at the core of this article. Women have persistently struggled for their rights and emancipation: in social movements, wormen's organisations and by challenging discrimination in organisations employing both women and men. But their success is often limited due to deep-seated cultural patriarchal norms.
  • Introduction

    Darwood, Nicola; Turner, Nick (Elizabeth Bowen Society, 2019-09-02)
    Introduction to volume 2 of The Elizabeth Bowen Review - September 2018
  • Book review: Elizabeth Bowen: Theory, Thought and Things, edited by Jessica Gildersleeve and Patricia Juliana Smith (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019).

    Darwood, Nicola; University of Bedfordshire (Elizabeth Bowen Society, 2020-09-30)
    Review of Elizabeth Bowen: Theory, Thought and Things, edited by Jessica Gildersleeve and Patricia Juliana Smith (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019) in The Elizabeth Bowen Review, volume 3
  • Introduction

    Darwood, Nicola; Turner, Nick (Elizabeth Bowen Society, 2020-09-30)
    Introduction to volume 3 of The Elizabeth Bowen Review
  • Childhood maternal school leaving age (level of education) and risk markers of metabolic syndrome in mid-adulthood: results from the 1958 British birth cohort

    Pappas Y; Iwundu, Chukwuma; Pang, Dong; (Dove Press, 2020-10-15)
    Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between childhood maternal level of education (CMLE) and changes in anthropometric and laboratory risk markers of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in mid-adulthood using results from the 1958 British Birth Cohort Study. Design: Cohort study. Participants: A total of 9376 study samples consisting of subjects that participated in the biomedical survey of the national child development study (NCDS) carried out between 2002 and 2004 were used for the analysis. Main Outcome Measures: Five risk markers of MetS: (i) HDL-cholesterol (ii) triglyceride (iii) blood pressure (BP) including systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) (iv) waist circumference (WC) and (v) glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Methods: The NCDS or the 1958 British birth cohort data deposited in the UK data service by the centre for longitudinal studies were used for analyses. Ordinary least squares regression was used to determine unit changes in the outcome variables given CMLE. Results: The estimates for unadjusted regression analysis of individual risk markers indicated a significant relationship between CMLE and alterations in the five risk markers of MetS (HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, WC, HbA1c, and BP) in midlife. After adjustment for birth and lifestyle characteristics/health behaviours, the relationship between CMLE and the risk markers was attenuated for HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and HbA1c but remained significant for WC 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.065– 1.30, p< 0.001) and SBP 1.48 (95% CI 0.48– 2.47 p< 0.001). Conclusion: There was a positive association between lower CMLE and the risk of MetS using the NCDS data. Lifestyle characteristics may be influential determinants of MetS risk in mid-adulthood.

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