Becoming a home-educator in a networked world: towards the democratisation of education alternatives?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623572
Title:
Becoming a home-educator in a networked world: towards the democratisation of education alternatives?
Authors:
Fensham-Smith, Amber ( 0000-0002-3481-2184 )
Abstract:
The internet is assumed to play a special role in UK home-education and has apparently fuelled an increase its prevalence. This paper reports the place and purpose of the internet, online networks and offline communities in the decision to home-educate amongst parents in England, Scotland and Wales. The research formed part of a mixed-method doctoral study that included: an online survey of 242 home-educators; 52 individual and group interviews with 85 parents, children and young people and a week-long participant observation with families. The sample included a range of both ‘new’ and ‘experienced’ home-educators. The findings show that online and offline networking helped prospective parents to learn of home-education as a viable and positive alternative to schooled provision. For parents, socialising with existing home-educators was pivotal for cultivating a sense of identity, belonging and commitment to an education without school. At the same time, becoming a legitimate home-educator was a complex achievement; hinged upon social and economic resources and cultural competencies. Evidence of exclusionary practices among home-educators both online and offline, challenges the extent to which home-education is truly more ‘open’ now than it once was. In the decision to home-educate, it is concluded that the democratising potential of the internet points to ‘old wine in new bottles’.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Fensham-Smith AJ (2018) 'Becoming a home-educator in a networked world: towards the democratisation of education alternatives?', Other Education, 8 (1), pp.27-57.
Publisher:
Other Business
Journal:
Other Education
Issue Date:
9-Jun-2019
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623572
Additional Links:
https://www.othereducation.org/index.php/OE/article/view/217
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2049-2162
EISSN:
2049-2162
Sponsors:
ESRC
Appears in Collections:
Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFensham-Smith, Amberen
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-08T12:55:27Z-
dc.date.available2019-11-08T12:55:27Z-
dc.date.issued2019-06-09-
dc.identifier.citationFensham-Smith AJ (2018) 'Becoming a home-educator in a networked world: towards the democratisation of education alternatives?', Other Education, 8 (1), pp.27-57.en
dc.identifier.issn2049-2162-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623572-
dc.description.abstractThe internet is assumed to play a special role in UK home-education and has apparently fuelled an increase its prevalence. This paper reports the place and purpose of the internet, online networks and offline communities in the decision to home-educate amongst parents in England, Scotland and Wales. The research formed part of a mixed-method doctoral study that included: an online survey of 242 home-educators; 52 individual and group interviews with 85 parents, children and young people and a week-long participant observation with families. The sample included a range of both ‘new’ and ‘experienced’ home-educators. The findings show that online and offline networking helped prospective parents to learn of home-education as a viable and positive alternative to schooled provision. For parents, socialising with existing home-educators was pivotal for cultivating a sense of identity, belonging and commitment to an education without school. At the same time, becoming a legitimate home-educator was a complex achievement; hinged upon social and economic resources and cultural competencies. Evidence of exclusionary practices among home-educators both online and offline, challenges the extent to which home-education is truly more ‘open’ now than it once was. In the decision to home-educate, it is concluded that the democratising potential of the internet points to ‘old wine in new bottles’.en
dc.description.sponsorshipESRCen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOther Businessen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.othereducation.org/index.php/OE/article/view/217en
dc.rightsBlue - can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecthome educationen
dc.subjectX300 Academic studies in Educationen
dc.titleBecoming a home-educator in a networked world: towards the democratisation of education alternatives?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2049-2162-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalOther Educationen
dc.date.updated2019-11-08T12:53:43Z-
dc.description.noteIf this is to be eligible for REF it will need a file attached; this publisher wishes us to use the final published pdf 21/06/2018 No response from researcher; pdf found and added 8/11/2019. Has been openly available on Web.-
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