Child protection with Muslim communities: considerations for non-Muslim-based orthodoxies/paradigms in child welfare and social work

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623429
Title:
Child protection with Muslim communities: considerations for non-Muslim-based orthodoxies/paradigms in child welfare and social work
Authors:
O’Leary, Patrick ( 0000-0002-6084-3734 ) ; Abdalla, Mohamad ( 0000-0002-3288-7166 ) ; Hutchinson, Aisha ( 0000-0002-5474-676X ) ; Squire, Jason; Young, Amy
Abstract:
The care and protection of children are a concern that crosses ethnic, religious and national boundaries. How communities act on these concerns are informed by cultural and religious understandings of childhood and protection. Islam has specific teachings that relate to the care and guardianship of children and are interpreted in diverse ways across the Muslim world. Islamic teachings on child-care mostly overlap with Western understandings of child protection, but there can be some contested positions. This creates complexities for social workers intervening in Muslim communities where the basis of their intervention is primarily informed by a non-Muslim paradigm or occurs in secular legal contexts. The purpose of this article is to address at a broad level the issue of how overarching concepts of child protection and Islam influence social work practice with Muslim communities. It addresses a gap in practical applications of the synergy of  Islamic thinking with core social work practice in the field of child protection. For effective practice, it is argued that social work practitioners need to consider common ground in Islamic thinking on child protection rather than rely on Western frameworks. This requires further research to build evidence-based practice with Muslim families.
Affiliation:
Griffith University; University of South Australia; University of Bedfordshire; King’s College London; University of Johannesburg; Universiti Sains Malaysia
Citation:
O’Leary P, Abdalla M., Hutchinson A, Squire J, Young A. (2019) 'Child protection with Muslim communities: considerations for non-Muslim-based orthodoxies/paradigms in child welfare and social work', British Journal of Social Work, (), pp.-.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work
Issue Date:
20-Jul-2019
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623429
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bcz088
Additional Links:
https://academic.oup.com/bjsw/advance-article/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcz088/5536601
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0045-3102
EISSN:
1468-263x
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO’Leary, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorAbdalla, Mohamaden
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorSquire, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T08:59:45Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T08:59:45Z-
dc.date.issued2019-07-20-
dc.identifier.citationO’Leary P, Abdalla M., Hutchinson A, Squire J, Young A. (2019) 'Child protection with Muslim communities: considerations for non-Muslim-based orthodoxies/paradigms in child welfare and social work', British Journal of Social Work, (), pp.-.en
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcz088-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623429-
dc.description.abstractThe care and protection of children are a concern that crosses ethnic, religious and national boundaries. How communities act on these concerns are informed by cultural and religious understandings of childhood and protection. Islam has specific teachings that relate to the care and guardianship of children and are interpreted in diverse ways across the Muslim world. Islamic teachings on child-care mostly overlap with Western understandings of child protection, but there can be some contested positions. This creates complexities for social workers intervening in Muslim communities where the basis of their intervention is primarily informed by a non-Muslim paradigm or occurs in secular legal contexts. The purpose of this article is to address at a broad level the issue of how overarching concepts of child protection and Islam influence social work practice with Muslim communities. It addresses a gap in practical applications of the synergy of  Islamic thinking with core social work practice in the field of child protection. For effective practice, it is argued that social work practitioners need to consider common ground in Islamic thinking on child protection rather than rely on Western frameworks. This requires further research to build evidence-based practice with Muslim families.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/bjsw/advance-article/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcz088/5536601en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectchildren's services social worken
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectsocial work with childrenen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectMuslim communitiesen
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.titleChild protection with Muslim communities: considerations for non-Muslim-based orthodoxies/paradigms in child welfare and social worken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1468-263x-
dc.contributor.departmentGriffith Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of South Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentKing’s College Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Johannesburgen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversiti Sains Malaysiaen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken
dc.date.updated2019-09-10T08:51:22Z-
dc.description.note2y embargo-
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