Exploration of individuals’ perspectives towards death and dying

2.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623336
Title:
Exploration of individuals’ perspectives towards death and dying
Authors:
Pinto, Alexandra ( 0000-0002-1354-9030 )
Abstract:
This thesis explores people’s attitudes towards death and dying. Humans have the ability to create meaning and attach these meanings to objects or events within their life, which then rouses some form of emotions. In respect of death emotions tend to be negative, but with meaning formation might provide the ability to develop positive emotions. Semi-structured interviews were utilised to explore the participants’ attitude towards death and dying. They comprised of seven women and two men with ages ranging from 21 to 81 years. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used, providing an explanation of an individual’s lived experience. Data revealed key factors influencing whether death was seen as normal part of life or an object of fear, included faith, meaning and communication, providing a more positive outlook to death and dying; death perceptions, anxiety, media and communication, providing a more negative outlook to death and dying. It is concluded that there is a cross-over between both negative and positive perspectives towards death and dying. Individuals may be both afraid of death but also accept death allowing an individual to find meaning within their everyday life.
Citation:
Pinto, A. (2018) 'Exploration of Individuals’ Perspectives towards Death and Dying` MSc thesis. University of Bedfordshire.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Issue Date:
Nov-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623336
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science by Research.
Appears in Collections:
Masters e-theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPinto, Alexandraen
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-01T11:38:27Z-
dc.date.available2019-07-01T11:38:27Z-
dc.date.issued2018-11-
dc.identifier.citationPinto, A. (2018) 'Exploration of Individuals’ Perspectives towards Death and Dying` MSc thesis. University of Bedfordshire.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623336-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science by Research.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores people’s attitudes towards death and dying. Humans have the ability to create meaning and attach these meanings to objects or events within their life, which then rouses some form of emotions. In respect of death emotions tend to be negative, but with meaning formation might provide the ability to develop positive emotions. Semi-structured interviews were utilised to explore the participants’ attitude towards death and dying. They comprised of seven women and two men with ages ranging from 21 to 81 years. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used, providing an explanation of an individual’s lived experience. Data revealed key factors influencing whether death was seen as normal part of life or an object of fear, included faith, meaning and communication, providing a more positive outlook to death and dying; death perceptions, anxiety, media and communication, providing a more negative outlook to death and dying. It is concluded that there is a cross-over between both negative and positive perspectives towards death and dying. Individuals may be both afraid of death but also accept death allowing an individual to find meaning within their everyday life.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectdeathen
dc.subjectdyingen
dc.subjectpositive psychologyen
dc.subjectMMTen
dc.subjectTMTen
dc.subjectdeath and dyingen
dc.subjectC800 Psychologyen
dc.titleExploration of individuals’ perspectives towards death and dyingen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
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