2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623324
Title:
The intaglio element in Prince's verse
Authors:
Farmer, Gareth
Other Titles:
Reading F. T. Prince
Abstract:
There is something peculiar about the syntax of Prince’s verse. Which adjectives come close to describing the curious, entangled emotions elicited when reading the lines from Prince’s most famous poem ‘Soldiers Bathing’: ‘And my mind towards the meaning of it strives // All’s pathos now. The body than was gross […] by pain and labour grows at length / Fragile and luminous’? How would we describe the quiet, reserved restraint of ‘Guns, gallows, barracks, poles and bars; / Seem to have laboured but to fetch us love’ from ‘The Book’? In this paper I propose that Prince’s syntax in the poems of Soldiers Bathing is a product of multiple pressures mirroring those he outlines in his intriguing The Italian Element in Milton’s Verse. It is just such pressures, I suggest, that enable him to carve out and maintain the co-presence of both conceptual and affective contradictions – entangled and uncertain ideas – which are the primary subject of these poems and which give his verse its peculiar quality.    
Citation:
Farmer G (2017) 'The intaglio element in Prince's verse', in May W (ed(s).). Reading F. T. Prince, edn, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press pp.-.
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
Issue Date:
23-Jan-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623324
Additional Links:
https://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/books/isbn/9781781383339/
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781781383339
Appears in Collections:
English literature

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Garethen
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-03T13:22:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-03T13:22:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-23-
dc.identifier.citationFarmer G (2017) 'The intaglio element in Prince's verse', in May W (ed(s).). Reading F. T. Prince, edn, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press pp.-.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781781383339-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623324-
dc.description.abstractThere is something peculiar about the syntax of Prince’s verse. Which adjectives come close to describing the curious, entangled emotions elicited when reading the lines from Prince’s most famous poem ‘Soldiers Bathing’: ‘And my mind towards the meaning of it strives // All’s pathos now. The body than was gross […] by pain and labour grows at length / Fragile and luminous’? How would we describe the quiet, reserved restraint of ‘Guns, gallows, barracks, poles and bars; / Seem to have laboured but to fetch us love’ from ‘The Book’? In this paper I propose that Prince’s syntax in the poems of Soldiers Bathing is a product of multiple pressures mirroring those he outlines in his intriguing The Italian Element in Milton’s Verse. It is just such pressures, I suggest, that enable him to carve out and maintain the co-presence of both conceptual and affective contradictions – entangled and uncertain ideas – which are the primary subject of these poems and which give his verse its peculiar quality.    en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLiverpool University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/books/isbn/9781781383339/en
dc.subjectpoetryen
dc.subjectFT Princeen
dc.subjectliterary theoryen
dc.subjectQ322 English Literature by authoren
dc.titleThe intaglio element in Prince's verseen
dc.title.alternativeReading F. T. Princeen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.date.updated2019-06-03T13:19:43Z-
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