Measuring grip strength in older adults: comparing the grip-ball with the Jamar dynamometer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623109
Title:
Measuring grip strength in older adults: comparing the grip-ball with the Jamar dynamometer
Authors:
Vermeulen, Joan; Neyens, Jacques C.L.; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D.; van Rossum, Erik; Hewson, David ( 0000-0002-7656-4000 ) ; de Witte, Luc P.
Abstract:
Decreased grip strength is a predictor of adverse outcomes in older adults. A Grip-ball was developed that can be used for home-based self-monitoring of grip strength to detect decline at an early stage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of measurements obtained with the Grip-ball in older adults. Forty nursing home patients and 59 community-dwelling older adults 60 years or older were invited to participate in this study. Grip strength in both hands was measured 3 consecutive times during a single visit using the Grip-ball and the Jamar dynamometer. Test-retest reliability was described using intraclass correlation coefficients. Concurrent validity was evaluated by calculating Pearson correlations between the mean Grip-ball and Jamar dynamometer measurements and between the highest measurements out of 3 trials. Known-groups validity was studied using t tests. Eighty eight participants (33 men) with a mean age of 75 (SD = 6.8) years were included. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the Grip-ball were 0.97 and 0.96 for the left and right hands, respectively (P < .001), and those for the Jamar dynamometer were 0.97 and 0.98 for the left and right hands, respectively (P < .001). Pearson correlations between the mean scores of the Grip-ball and the Jamar dynamometer were 0.71 (P < .001) and 0.76 (P < .001) for the left and right hands, respectively. Pearson correlations between the highest scores out of 3 trials were 0.69 (P < .001) and 0.78 (P < .001) for the left and right hands, respectively. The t tests revealed that both the Grip-ball and the Jamar dynamometer detected grip strength differences between men and women but not between nursing home patients and community-dwelling older adults. Grip-ball measurements did not confirm higher grip strength of the dominant hand whereas the Jamar dynamometer did. The Grip-ball provides reliable grip strength estimates in older adults. Correlations found between the Grip-ball and Jamar dynamometer measurements suggest acceptable concurrent validity. The Grip-ball seems capable of detecting "larger" grip strength differences but might have difficulty detecting "smaller" differences that were detected by the Jamar dynamometer. The Grip-ball could be used in practice to enable home-based self-monitoring of grip strength in older adults. However, for implementation of the Grip-ball as a screening and monitoring device in practice, it is important to gain insight into intersession reliability during home-based use of the Grip-ball and clinical relevance of changes in grip strength. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE METHODS RESULTS CONCLUSIONS
Citation:
Vermeulen J, Neyens JCL, Spreeuwenberg MK, van Rossum E, Hewson DJ, de Witte LP (2015) 'Measuring grip strength in older adults: comparing the grip-ball with the Jamar dynamometer', Journal of geriatric physical therapy (2001), 38 (3), pp.148-53.
Publisher:
Wolters Kluwer
Journal:
Journal of geriatric physical therapy (2001)
Issue Date:
31-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623109
DOI:
10.1519/JPT.0000000000000034
PubMed ID:
25594521
Additional Links:
https://journals.lww.com/jgpt/fulltext/2015/07000/Measuring_Grip_Strength_in_Older_Adults__.7.aspx
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2152-0895
Appears in Collections:
Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVermeulen, Joanen
dc.contributor.authorNeyens, Jacques C.L.en
dc.contributor.authorSpreeuwenberg, Marieke D.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Rossum, Eriken
dc.contributor.authorHewson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorde Witte, Luc P.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-28T13:43:44Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-28T13:43:44Z-
dc.date.issued2015-12-31-
dc.identifier.citationVermeulen J, Neyens JCL, Spreeuwenberg MK, van Rossum E, Hewson DJ, de Witte LP (2015) 'Measuring grip strength in older adults: comparing the grip-ball with the Jamar dynamometer', Journal of geriatric physical therapy (2001), 38 (3), pp.148-53.en
dc.identifier.issn2152-0895-
dc.identifier.pmid25594521-
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JPT.0000000000000034-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623109-
dc.description.abstractDecreased grip strength is a predictor of adverse outcomes in older adults. A Grip-ball was developed that can be used for home-based self-monitoring of grip strength to detect decline at an early stage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of measurements obtained with the Grip-ball in older adults. Forty nursing home patients and 59 community-dwelling older adults 60 years or older were invited to participate in this study. Grip strength in both hands was measured 3 consecutive times during a single visit using the Grip-ball and the Jamar dynamometer. Test-retest reliability was described using intraclass correlation coefficients. Concurrent validity was evaluated by calculating Pearson correlations between the mean Grip-ball and Jamar dynamometer measurements and between the highest measurements out of 3 trials. Known-groups validity was studied using t tests. Eighty eight participants (33 men) with a mean age of 75 (SD = 6.8) years were included. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the Grip-ball were 0.97 and 0.96 for the left and right hands, respectively (P < .001), and those for the Jamar dynamometer were 0.97 and 0.98 for the left and right hands, respectively (P < .001). Pearson correlations between the mean scores of the Grip-ball and the Jamar dynamometer were 0.71 (P < .001) and 0.76 (P < .001) for the left and right hands, respectively. Pearson correlations between the highest scores out of 3 trials were 0.69 (P < .001) and 0.78 (P < .001) for the left and right hands, respectively. The t tests revealed that both the Grip-ball and the Jamar dynamometer detected grip strength differences between men and women but not between nursing home patients and community-dwelling older adults. Grip-ball measurements did not confirm higher grip strength of the dominant hand whereas the Jamar dynamometer did. The Grip-ball provides reliable grip strength estimates in older adults. Correlations found between the Grip-ball and Jamar dynamometer measurements suggest acceptable concurrent validity. The Grip-ball seems capable of detecting "larger" grip strength differences but might have difficulty detecting "smaller" differences that were detected by the Jamar dynamometer. The Grip-ball could be used in practice to enable home-based self-monitoring of grip strength in older adults. However, for implementation of the Grip-ball as a screening and monitoring device in practice, it is important to gain insight into intersession reliability during home-based use of the Grip-ball and clinical relevance of changes in grip strength. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE METHODS RESULTS CONCLUSIONSen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWolters Kluweren
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.lww.com/jgpt/fulltext/2015/07000/Measuring_Grip_Strength_in_Older_Adults__.7.aspxen
dc.subjecthand gripen
dc.subjectolder adultsen
dc.titleMeasuring grip strength in older adults: comparing the grip-ball with the Jamar dynamometeren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of geriatric physical therapy (2001)en
dc.date.updated2019-01-28T13:40:08Z-

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