Fractal time series analysis of postural stability in elderly and control subjects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623108
Title:
Fractal time series analysis of postural stability in elderly and control subjects
Authors:
Amoud, Hassan; Abadi, Mohamed; Hewson, David ( 0000-0002-7656-4000 ) ; Michel-Pellegrino, Valerie; Doussot, Michel; Duchêne, Jacques
Abstract:
The study of balance using stabilogram analysis is of particular interest in the study of falls. Although simple statistical parameters derived from the stabilogram have been shown to predict risk of falls, such measures offer little insight into the underlying control mechanisms responsible for degradation in balance. In contrast, fractal and non-linear time-series analysis of stabilograms, such as estimations of the Hurst exponent (H), may provide information related to the underlying motor control strategies governing postural stability. In order to be adapted for a home-based follow-up of balance, such methods need to be robust, regardless of the experimental protocol, while producing time-series that are as short as possible. The present study compares two methods of calculating H: Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Stabilogram Diffusion Analysis (SDA) for elderly and control subjects, as well as evaluating the effect of recording duration. Centre of pressure signals were obtained from 90 young adult subjects and 10 elderly subjects. Data were sampled at 100 Hz for 30 s, including stepping onto and off the force plate. Estimations of H were made using sliding windows of 10, 5, and 2.5 s durations, with windows slid forward in 1-s increments. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for the effect of time, age and estimation method on the Hurst exponent, while the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used as a measure of reliability. Both SDA and DFA methods were able to identify differences in postural stability between control and elderly subjects for time series as short as 5 s, with ICC values as high as 0.75 for DFA. Both methods would be well-suited to non-invasive longitudinal assessment of balance. In addition, reliable estimations of H were obtained from time series as short as 5 s. BACKGROUND METHODS RESULTS CONCLUSION
Citation:
Amoud H, Abadi M, Hewson DJ, Michel-Pellegrino V, Doussot M, Duchêne J (2007) 'Fractal time series analysis of postural stability in elderly and control subjects', Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 4 (12), pp.-.
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Issue Date:
1-May-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/623108
DOI:
10.1186/1743-0003-4-12
PubMed ID:
17470303
Additional Links:
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-0003-4-12
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1743-0003
Appears in Collections:
Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAmoud, Hassanen
dc.contributor.authorAbadi, Mohameden
dc.contributor.authorHewson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorMichel-Pellegrino, Valerieen
dc.contributor.authorDoussot, Michelen
dc.contributor.authorDuchêne, Jacquesen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-28T13:43:35Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-28T13:43:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007-05-01-
dc.identifier.citationAmoud H, Abadi M, Hewson DJ, Michel-Pellegrino V, Doussot M, Duchêne J (2007) 'Fractal time series analysis of postural stability in elderly and control subjects', Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 4 (12), pp.-.en
dc.identifier.issn1743-0003-
dc.identifier.pmid17470303-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1743-0003-4-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623108-
dc.description.abstractThe study of balance using stabilogram analysis is of particular interest in the study of falls. Although simple statistical parameters derived from the stabilogram have been shown to predict risk of falls, such measures offer little insight into the underlying control mechanisms responsible for degradation in balance. In contrast, fractal and non-linear time-series analysis of stabilograms, such as estimations of the Hurst exponent (H), may provide information related to the underlying motor control strategies governing postural stability. In order to be adapted for a home-based follow-up of balance, such methods need to be robust, regardless of the experimental protocol, while producing time-series that are as short as possible. The present study compares two methods of calculating H: Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Stabilogram Diffusion Analysis (SDA) for elderly and control subjects, as well as evaluating the effect of recording duration. Centre of pressure signals were obtained from 90 young adult subjects and 10 elderly subjects. Data were sampled at 100 Hz for 30 s, including stepping onto and off the force plate. Estimations of H were made using sliding windows of 10, 5, and 2.5 s durations, with windows slid forward in 1-s increments. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for the effect of time, age and estimation method on the Hurst exponent, while the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used as a measure of reliability. Both SDA and DFA methods were able to identify differences in postural stability between control and elderly subjects for time series as short as 5 s, with ICC values as high as 0.75 for DFA. Both methods would be well-suited to non-invasive longitudinal assessment of balance. In addition, reliable estimations of H were obtained from time series as short as 5 s. BACKGROUND METHODS RESULTS CONCLUSIONen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttps://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-0003-4-12en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbalanceen
dc.subjectelderlyen
dc.titleFractal time series analysis of postural stability in elderly and control subjectsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitationen
dc.date.updated2019-01-28T13:40:09Z-
dc.description.noteoa article-

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