The impact of employability on technology acceptance in students: findings from Coventry University London

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622936
Title:
The impact of employability on technology acceptance in students: findings from Coventry University London
Authors:
Taylor, Aaron
Abstract:
This article seeks to understand impact of employability on technology acceptance in students from a constructivist perspective. The growing significance of technology usage in academia prompted this research as well as the need to understand if the technologies that I and my colleagues use on a regular basis were successful in engaging learners. It was imperative to understand if we were meeting the expectations of our students as well as Coventry University London which has invested a great deal into their implementation. Therefore, 20 students from Coventry University London were interviewed to uncover their thoughts and experiences into their acceptance and ultimate use of learning technologies. These students were interviewed over a two‐year period (2016‐2017) in order to capture accurate data and keep pace with the ever‐evolving and arguably ephemeral nature of technology. Students also participated in focus groups after each set of interviews in order to explore relevant issues in greater depth. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was then applied to ascertain if employability was a significant variable in influencing technology acceptance. It was important to understand if the learning technologies utilised by academics were able to help students gain employment and be successful in their chosen occupations. The empirical data confirmed the view that learning technologies which had a positive perceived benefit in enhancing employability outcomes play a significant role in engaging an array of international students in their studies. These findings arguably demonstrate the need for the institution to reconfigure and enhance the clarity of its technology‐enhanced learning strategy as well as its level of support to teaching staff. This proposal will allow academics to have sufficient opportunity to effectively utilise and apply learning technologies as part of their own individual pedagogical strategy and students to improve their employability skills as a result.
Affiliation:
Coventry University
Citation:
Taylor, A. (2018) 'The impact of employability on technology acceptance in students: findings from Coventry University London', Journal of pedagogic development 8 (3)
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Oct-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622936
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/475/671
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Aaronen
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-01T13:04:54Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-01T13:04:54Z-
dc.date.issued2018-10-
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, A. (2018) 'The impact of employability on technology acceptance in students: findings from Coventry University London', Journal of pedagogic development 8 (3)en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622936-
dc.description.abstractThis article seeks to understand impact of employability on technology acceptance in students from a constructivist perspective. The growing significance of technology usage in academia prompted this research as well as the need to understand if the technologies that I and my colleagues use on a regular basis were successful in engaging learners. It was imperative to understand if we were meeting the expectations of our students as well as Coventry University London which has invested a great deal into their implementation. Therefore, 20 students from Coventry University London were interviewed to uncover their thoughts and experiences into their acceptance and ultimate use of learning technologies. These students were interviewed over a two‐year period (2016‐2017) in order to capture accurate data and keep pace with the ever‐evolving and arguably ephemeral nature of technology. Students also participated in focus groups after each set of interviews in order to explore relevant issues in greater depth. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was then applied to ascertain if employability was a significant variable in influencing technology acceptance. It was important to understand if the learning technologies utilised by academics were able to help students gain employment and be successful in their chosen occupations. The empirical data confirmed the view that learning technologies which had a positive perceived benefit in enhancing employability outcomes play a significant role in engaging an array of international students in their studies. These findings arguably demonstrate the need for the institution to reconfigure and enhance the clarity of its technology‐enhanced learning strategy as well as its level of support to teaching staff. This proposal will allow academics to have sufficient opportunity to effectively utilise and apply learning technologies as part of their own individual pedagogical strategy and students to improve their employability skills as a result.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/475/671en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecttechnology acceptanceen
dc.subjecttechnology acceptance modellingen
dc.subjecttechnology acceptance modelsen
dc.subjectTAMen
dc.subjectinternational postgraduate studentsen
dc.subjectacademicsen
dc.subjectemployabilityen
dc.subjectlearning technologiesen
dc.subjectlearning technologyen
dc.subjectconstructivismen
dc.subjectX342 Academic studies in Higher Educationen
dc.titleThe impact of employability on technology acceptance in students: findings from Coventry University Londonen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCoventry Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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