2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622825
Title:
Teaching online (book excerpt from a work in progress)
Authors:
Pitt, Tina Joy
Abstract:
The way we facilitate learning in higher education has undergone change. No longer are we constrained by time and space (Erisman & Steele, 2015). In their report, Erisman & Steele find institutions of higher education serving a much larger population of returning adult learners for whom advanced degrees and certifications can provide a difference in their working and personal lives. In the current online learning environments, we no longer have as much flexibility over the instructional strategies we want to use. Content and activities are built through the use of readings, videos, reference websites, mandated discussions, selfreflection activities and structured assignments. Faculty are hired to teach through establishing a feedback working relationship with students. In building this relationship, the nature of how you communicate and work together changes. What may have been effective in a face‐to‐face learning environment may not work online. This adds a new dimension to how faculty do their jobs. You may ask how educators bring the richness and expertise normally added to learning environments into an established course that we probably did not create. To facilitate learning effectively, adding new skills to our teaching toolbox helps us make the best use of online learning environments. This article represents an opportunity to take what might feel like a sterile learning environment and build on your own teaching skills to become a more effective educator. You are the one who will support student learning and provide students with a quality learning experience based on the working relationship you build with your learners. Online teaching may sound like a lot more work. It is not. You are working differently and hopefully after reading this article, working more effectively.
Affiliation:
Northcentral University
Citation:
Pitt, T.J. (2018) 'Teaching online (book excerpt from a work in progress)', Journal of pedagogic development 8 (2) 66-72
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Aug-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622825
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/459
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPitt, Tina Joyen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-13T13:34:08Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-13T13:34:08Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-
dc.identifier.citationPitt, T.J. (2018) 'Teaching online (book excerpt from a work in progress)', Journal of pedagogic development 8 (2) 66-72en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622825-
dc.description.abstractThe way we facilitate learning in higher education has undergone change. No longer are we constrained by time and space (Erisman & Steele, 2015). In their report, Erisman & Steele find institutions of higher education serving a much larger population of returning adult learners for whom advanced degrees and certifications can provide a difference in their working and personal lives. In the current online learning environments, we no longer have as much flexibility over the instructional strategies we want to use. Content and activities are built through the use of readings, videos, reference websites, mandated discussions, selfreflection activities and structured assignments. Faculty are hired to teach through establishing a feedback working relationship with students. In building this relationship, the nature of how you communicate and work together changes. What may have been effective in a face‐to‐face learning environment may not work online. This adds a new dimension to how faculty do their jobs. You may ask how educators bring the richness and expertise normally added to learning environments into an established course that we probably did not create. To facilitate learning effectively, adding new skills to our teaching toolbox helps us make the best use of online learning environments. This article represents an opportunity to take what might feel like a sterile learning environment and build on your own teaching skills to become a more effective educator. You are the one who will support student learning and provide students with a quality learning experience based on the working relationship you build with your learners. Online teaching may sound like a lot more work. It is not. You are working differently and hopefully after reading this article, working more effectively.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/459en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectteachingen
dc.subjectcomputers in educationen
dc.subjectonline learningen
dc.subjectonline pedagogyen
dc.subjectX342 Academic studies in Higher Educationen
dc.titleTeaching online (book excerpt from a work in progress)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorthcentral Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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