2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622821
Title:
Lecture capture: reflections on pedagogy vs. perception
Authors:
Crawford, Russell
Abstract:
I have been sitting on this piece of writing for a while now. Partially due to time factors but mostly due to how these thoughts might be interpreted, or rather misinterpreted, given the current HE sector trends. I originally intended this piece to help inform close colleagues from different disciplinary contexts about the pedagogy underpinning lecture capture technologies, but it occurred that this was a conversation that was worth having in a wider forum. There is a wide selection of papers that look at student perception of lecture capture but evaluation strategies rarely include front‐line teaching staffs’ opinions (Sim, 2018). I use the qualifier ‘front‐line’ because where staff are concerned, lecture capture seems to form a nexus around which teachers and managers differ in opinion. These opinions seem to depend on individual drivers of success and excellence. I should state up front that I am lecture capture neutral, meaning that I think of it as a tool and, as with all tools, if you use it well, it works, and if you do not, it does not. I thought it was time to share my views in the hope that colleagues can use these points to better inform their use of this divisive learning technology.
Affiliation:
Keele University
Citation:
Crawford, R. (2018) 'Lecture capture: reflections on pedagogy vs. perception', Journal of pedagogic development 8 (2) 40:44
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Aug-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622821
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/456
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Russellen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-13T13:33:45Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-13T13:33:45Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-
dc.identifier.citationCrawford, R. (2018) 'Lecture capture: reflections on pedagogy vs. perception', Journal of pedagogic development 8 (2) 40:44en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622821-
dc.description.abstractI have been sitting on this piece of writing for a while now. Partially due to time factors but mostly due to how these thoughts might be interpreted, or rather misinterpreted, given the current HE sector trends. I originally intended this piece to help inform close colleagues from different disciplinary contexts about the pedagogy underpinning lecture capture technologies, but it occurred that this was a conversation that was worth having in a wider forum. There is a wide selection of papers that look at student perception of lecture capture but evaluation strategies rarely include front‐line teaching staffs’ opinions (Sim, 2018). I use the qualifier ‘front‐line’ because where staff are concerned, lecture capture seems to form a nexus around which teachers and managers differ in opinion. These opinions seem to depend on individual drivers of success and excellence. I should state up front that I am lecture capture neutral, meaning that I think of it as a tool and, as with all tools, if you use it well, it works, and if you do not, it does not. I thought it was time to share my views in the hope that colleagues can use these points to better inform their use of this divisive learning technology.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/456en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectlecture captureen
dc.subjectpedagogyen
dc.subjectX342 Academic studies in Higher Educationen
dc.titleLecture capture: reflections on pedagogy vs. perceptionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKeele Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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