Does parental support moderate the effect of children's motivation and self-efficacy on physical activity and sedentary behaviour?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622534
Title:
Does parental support moderate the effect of children's motivation and self-efficacy on physical activity and sedentary behaviour?
Authors:
Gillison, F.B.; Standage, M.; Cumming, S.P.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K. ( 0000-0003-4167-4100 ) ; Rouse, P.C.; Katzmarzyk, P.T.
Abstract:
Objectives: 1) To test whether parental support moderates the direct effects of children's motivation and self-efficacy on objectively measured moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. 2) To explore differences in the relationships between boys and girls. Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Method: Data were collected from 430 9-11 year old UK children and their parents; parents selfreported on the support they provided to their children to be active (through providing transport, encouragement, watching, or taking part with their child), and children self-reported their motivation and self-efficacy towards exercise. MVPA and sedentary time were measured using accelerometers. Results: Both parent- and child-level factors were largely positively associated with children's MVPA and negatively related to sedentary time. There was no evidence of a moderation effect of parental support on MVPA or sedentary time in boys. Parental provision of transport moderated the effect of girls' motivation on week-day MVPA; more motivated girls were less active when transport was provided. Transport and exercising with one's child moderated the effect of motivation and self-efficacy on girls' sedentary time at weekends; more motivated girls, and those with higher self-efficacy were less sedentary when parents provided more frequent transportation or took part in physical activity with them. Conclusions: The results largely supported a model of the independent effects of parent and child determinants for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, but there was evidence that some types of parent support can moderate sedentary time in girls. Further research is needed to explore the causal pathways between the observed cross-sectional results.
Affiliation:
University of Bath; Pennington Biomedical Research Centre
Citation:
Gillison FB, Standage M, Cumming SP, Zakrzewski-Fruer JK, Rouse, PC, Katzmarzyk PT (2017) 'Does parental support moderate the effect of children's motivation and self-efficacy on physical activity and sedentary behaviour?', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 32, pp.153-161.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Psychology of Sport and Exercise
Issue Date:
13-Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622534
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.07.004
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1469029216303077
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1469-0292
Appears in Collections:
Sport and physical activity

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGillison, F.B.en
dc.contributor.authorStandage, M.en
dc.contributor.authorCumming, S.P.en
dc.contributor.authorZakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.en
dc.contributor.authorRouse, P.C.en
dc.contributor.authorKatzmarzyk, P.T.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-08T11:11:04Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-08T11:11:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-13-
dc.identifier.citationGillison FB, Standage M, Cumming SP, Zakrzewski-Fruer JK, Rouse, PC, Katzmarzyk PT (2017) 'Does parental support moderate the effect of children's motivation and self-efficacy on physical activity and sedentary behaviour?', Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 32, pp.153-161.en
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.07.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622534-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: 1) To test whether parental support moderates the direct effects of children's motivation and self-efficacy on objectively measured moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. 2) To explore differences in the relationships between boys and girls. Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Method: Data were collected from 430 9-11 year old UK children and their parents; parents selfreported on the support they provided to their children to be active (through providing transport, encouragement, watching, or taking part with their child), and children self-reported their motivation and self-efficacy towards exercise. MVPA and sedentary time were measured using accelerometers. Results: Both parent- and child-level factors were largely positively associated with children's MVPA and negatively related to sedentary time. There was no evidence of a moderation effect of parental support on MVPA or sedentary time in boys. Parental provision of transport moderated the effect of girls' motivation on week-day MVPA; more motivated girls were less active when transport was provided. Transport and exercising with one's child moderated the effect of motivation and self-efficacy on girls' sedentary time at weekends; more motivated girls, and those with higher self-efficacy were less sedentary when parents provided more frequent transportation or took part in physical activity with them. Conclusions: The results largely supported a model of the independent effects of parent and child determinants for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, but there was evidence that some types of parent support can moderate sedentary time in girls. Further research is needed to explore the causal pathways between the observed cross-sectional results.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1469029216303077en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectparental engagementen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.subjectself-efficacy theoryen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.subjectsedentary behaviouren
dc.subjectparentsen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.titleDoes parental support moderate the effect of children's motivation and self-efficacy on physical activity and sedentary behaviour?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bathen
dc.contributor.departmentPennington Biomedical Research Centreen
dc.identifier.journalPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen
dc.date.updated2018-03-08T11:02:18Z-
dc.description.noteHi, you have attached the final published version, which this publisher doesn't allow. (Information at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1469-0292/) Do you have a copy of the postprint (the version after review, but before the final formatting applied) that we can archive? post print supplied-
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