What are the most effective behaviour change techniques to promote physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behaviour in inactive adults? : a systematic review protocol

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622505
Title:
What are the most effective behaviour change techniques to promote physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behaviour in inactive adults? : a systematic review protocol
Authors:
Howlett, Neil ( 0000-0002-6502-9969 ) ; Trivedi, Daksha ( 0000-0002-7572-4113 ) ; Troop, Nicholas A.; Chater, Angel M. ( 0000-0002-9043-2565 )
Abstract:
Introduction: A large proportion of the population are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity and have increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Low levels of physical activity are predictive of poor health outcomes and time spent sedentary is related to a host of risk factors independently of physical activity levels. Building an evidence base of the best approaches to intervene in the lifestyles of inactive individuals is crucial in preventing longterm disease, disability, and higher mortality rates. Methods and Analysis: Systematic searches will be conducted on all relevant databases (e.g. PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO). Studies will be included if they assess interventions aimed at changing physical activity or sedentary behaviour levels in adults (over 18) who are inactive and do not suffer from chronic conditions. Studies must also be randomised controlled trials (RCT), have a primary outcome of physical activity or sedentary behaviour, and measure outcomes at least six months after intervention completion. Studies will be coded using the Behaviour Change Technique (BCT) taxonomy v1 and TIDieR guidelines. Two reviewers will independently screen full-text articles and extract data on study characteristics, participants, BCTs, intervention features, and outcome measures. Study quality will also be assessed independently by two reviewers using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A meta-analysis will be considered if there is sufficient homogeneity across outcomes. GRADE criteria will be used to assess quality of evidence. Dissemination: This will be the first review to systematically appraise interventions aimed at changing the physical activity or sedentary behaviour of inactive individuals using RCT designs with a six-month follow-up post intervention. This review will better inform intervention designers targeting inactive populations and inform the design of a future complex intervention. Review registration: This protocol was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) on 17th October 2014 (registration number: CRD42014014321).
Affiliation:
University of Hertfordshire; University College London
Citation:
Howlett N, Trivedi D, Troop NA, Chater AM (2015) 'What are the most effective behaviour change techniques to promote physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behaviour in inactive adults? : a systematic review protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (8).
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
BMJ Open
Issue Date:
5-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622505
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008573
Additional Links:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/8/e008573
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2044-6055
Appears in Collections:
Sport and physical activity

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowlett, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorTrivedi, Dakshaen
dc.contributor.authorTroop, Nicholas A.en
dc.contributor.authorChater, Angel M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-19T10:46:18Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-19T10:46:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015-08-05-
dc.identifier.citationHowlett N, Trivedi D, Troop NA, Chater AM (2015) 'What are the most effective behaviour change techniques to promote physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behaviour in inactive adults? : a systematic review protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (8).en
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008573-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622505-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: A large proportion of the population are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity and have increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Low levels of physical activity are predictive of poor health outcomes and time spent sedentary is related to a host of risk factors independently of physical activity levels. Building an evidence base of the best approaches to intervene in the lifestyles of inactive individuals is crucial in preventing longterm disease, disability, and higher mortality rates. Methods and Analysis: Systematic searches will be conducted on all relevant databases (e.g. PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO). Studies will be included if they assess interventions aimed at changing physical activity or sedentary behaviour levels in adults (over 18) who are inactive and do not suffer from chronic conditions. Studies must also be randomised controlled trials (RCT), have a primary outcome of physical activity or sedentary behaviour, and measure outcomes at least six months after intervention completion. Studies will be coded using the Behaviour Change Technique (BCT) taxonomy v1 and TIDieR guidelines. Two reviewers will independently screen full-text articles and extract data on study characteristics, participants, BCTs, intervention features, and outcome measures. Study quality will also be assessed independently by two reviewers using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A meta-analysis will be considered if there is sufficient homogeneity across outcomes. GRADE criteria will be used to assess quality of evidence. Dissemination: This will be the first review to systematically appraise interventions aimed at changing the physical activity or sedentary behaviour of inactive individuals using RCT designs with a six-month follow-up post intervention. This review will better inform intervention designers targeting inactive populations and inform the design of a future complex intervention. Review registration: This protocol was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) on 17th October 2014 (registration number: CRD42014014321).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/8/e008573en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titleWhat are the most effective behaviour change techniques to promote physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behaviour in inactive adults? : a systematic review protocolen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Hertfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Londonen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openen
dc.date.updated2018-02-19T10:32:59Z-
dc.description.noteopen access-
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