Meaning in hoarding: perspectives of people who hoard on clutter, culture and agency

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622453
Title:
Meaning in hoarding: perspectives of people who hoard on clutter, culture and agency
Authors:
Orr, David ( 0000-0003-2107-2671 ) ; Preston-Shoot, Michael ( 0000-0002-9347-0524 ) ; Braye, Suzy
Abstract:
Hoarding has become increasingly prominent in clinical practice and popular culture in recent years, giving rise to extensive research and commentary. Critical responses in the social sciences have criticised the cultural assumptions built in to the construct of ‘hoarding disorder’ and expressed fears that it may generate stigma outweighing its benefits; however, few of these studies have engaged directly with ‘hoarders’ themselves. This paper reports on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with ten individuals living in England, who received assessment and intervention for hoarding from Social Services. Their narratives drew on the cultural repertoire of values and discourses around waste and worth, the mediation of sociality and relationships through material objects, physical constraints on keeping order, and the role played by mental health. Analysing these perspectives anthropologically shows how dominant models of hoarding, such as the DSM-5 paradigm, potentially lend themselves to reductionist understandings that efface the meaning ‘hoarding’ may have and thereby deny agency to the person labelled as ‘hoarder’. More culturally informed analysis, by contrast, affords insights into the complex landscape of value, waste, social critique, emotion, interpersonal relationships and practical difficulties that may underlie hoarding cases, and points the way to more person-centred practice and analysis.
Affiliation:
University of Sussex; University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Orr D, Preston-Shoot M, Braye S (2017) 'Meaning in hoarding: perspectives of people who hoard on clutter, culture and agency', Anthropology and Medicine.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Anthropology and Medicine
Issue Date:
12-Dec-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622453
DOI:
10.1080/13648470.2017.1391171
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13648470.2017.1391171?journalCode=canm20
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1364-8470
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOrr, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorPreston-Shoot, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorBraye, Suzyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-19T11:07:44Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-19T11:07:44Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-12-
dc.identifier.citationOrr D, Preston-Shoot M, Braye S (2017) 'Meaning in hoarding: perspectives of people who hoard on clutter, culture and agency', Anthropology and Medicine.en
dc.identifier.issn1364-8470-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13648470.2017.1391171-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622453-
dc.description.abstractHoarding has become increasingly prominent in clinical practice and popular culture in recent years, giving rise to extensive research and commentary. Critical responses in the social sciences have criticised the cultural assumptions built in to the construct of ‘hoarding disorder’ and expressed fears that it may generate stigma outweighing its benefits; however, few of these studies have engaged directly with ‘hoarders’ themselves. This paper reports on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with ten individuals living in England, who received assessment and intervention for hoarding from Social Services. Their narratives drew on the cultural repertoire of values and discourses around waste and worth, the mediation of sociality and relationships through material objects, physical constraints on keeping order, and the role played by mental health. Analysing these perspectives anthropologically shows how dominant models of hoarding, such as the DSM-5 paradigm, potentially lend themselves to reductionist understandings that efface the meaning ‘hoarding’ may have and thereby deny agency to the person labelled as ‘hoarder’. More culturally informed analysis, by contrast, affords insights into the complex landscape of value, waste, social critique, emotion, interpersonal relationships and practical difficulties that may underlie hoarding cases, and points the way to more person-centred practice and analysis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13648470.2017.1391171?journalCode=canm20en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecthoardingen
dc.subjectDSM-5en
dc.subjectwasteen
dc.subjectmaterialityen
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.subjectC800 Psychologyen
dc.titleMeaning in hoarding: perspectives of people who hoard on clutter, culture and agencyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sussexen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalAnthropology and Medicineen
dc.date.updated2017-12-19T11:01:54Z-
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