Who represents the revolutionaries? examples from the Egyptian revolution 2011

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622425
Title:
Who represents the revolutionaries? examples from the Egyptian revolution 2011
Authors:
Mellor, Noha ( 0000-0003-3709-4808 )
Abstract:
Recently, there has been a debate among Egyptian intellectuals about who ideally represents the Tahrir (liberation) revolutionaries. This article reflects on this debate with a focus on selected examples of middle-class liberal revolutionaries and their mediated accounts of the so-called Battle of Camel, which took place on 2 February 2011. The examples help illustrate how the mediation and construction of this event enforces the image of protestors as secular middle class, thereby relegating to the background the role played by religious groups such as the influential Muslim Brotherhood. The accounts also marginalized working-class voices, although this group significantly contributed to the success of the revolution. The selected examples indicate the dynamism of the protests as a multi-layered text and a cultural artefact, open to multiple interpretations with regard to the representation of the revolutionaries.
Citation:
Mellor N. (2013) 'Who represents the revolutionaries? examples from the Egyptian revolution 2011', Mediterranean Politics, 19 (1), pp.82-98.
Publisher:
Informa {UK} Limited
Journal:
Mediterranean Politics
Issue Date:
12-Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622425
DOI:
10.1080/13629395.2013.826446
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2013.826446
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1362-9395
Appears in Collections:
Media and film

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMellor, Nohaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:18:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:18:36Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-12-
dc.identifier.citationMellor N. (2013) 'Who represents the revolutionaries? examples from the Egyptian revolution 2011', Mediterranean Politics, 19 (1), pp.82-98.en
dc.identifier.issn1362-9395-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13629395.2013.826446-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622425-
dc.description.abstractRecently, there has been a debate among Egyptian intellectuals about who ideally represents the Tahrir (liberation) revolutionaries. This article reflects on this debate with a focus on selected examples of middle-class liberal revolutionaries and their mediated accounts of the so-called Battle of Camel, which took place on 2 February 2011. The examples help illustrate how the mediation and construction of this event enforces the image of protestors as secular middle class, thereby relegating to the background the role played by religious groups such as the influential Muslim Brotherhood. The accounts also marginalized working-class voices, although this group significantly contributed to the success of the revolution. The selected examples indicate the dynamism of the protests as a multi-layered text and a cultural artefact, open to multiple interpretations with regard to the representation of the revolutionaries.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma {UK} Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2013.826446en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.subjectEgyptian uprisingen
dc.subjectEgypten
dc.subjectEgyptian revolutionen
dc.subjectArab uprisingsen
dc.subjectL243 Politics of a specific country/regionen
dc.titleWho represents the revolutionaries? examples from the Egyptian revolution 2011en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMediterranean Politicsen
dc.date.updated2017-11-27T11:22:42Z-
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