Getting our country back : the UK press on the eve of the EU referendum

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622424
Title:
Getting our country back : the UK press on the eve of the EU referendum
Authors:
Rowinski, Paul
Abstract:
This paper investigates a critical discourse analysis the author has conducted of UK mainstream newspaper coverage on the eve of the EU referendum. Immigration became a key issue in the closing days. The paper will explore the possibility that the discourse moved from persuasion to prejudice and xenophobia. The paper will also argue that in the age of populist post-truth politics, some of the newspapers also employed such emotive rhetoric, designed to influence and compel the audience to draw certain conclusions – to get their country back. In so doing, it is argued some of the UK media also pose a serious threat to democracy and journalism – rather than holding those in power to account and maintaining high journalistic standards. The notion that that some of the UK media played on public perceptions and a collective memory that has created, propagated and embedded many myths about the EU for decades, is explored. The possibility this swayed many – despite limited or a lack of substantiation, is explored, a discourse of ellipsis, if you will.
Citation:
Rowinski P (2017) 'Getting our country back : the UK press on the eve of the EU referendum', Political Studies Association Annual International Conference - Glasgow, Political Studies Association.
Publisher:
Political Studies Association
Issue Date:
27-Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622424
Additional Links:
https://www.psa.ac.uk/sites/default/files/conference/papers/2017/Getting our country back. The UK press on the eve of the EU referendum. Paul Rowinski._0.pdf
Type:
Conference papers, meetings and proceedings
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Media and film

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRowinski, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:18:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:18:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-27-
dc.identifier.citationRowinski P (2017) 'Getting our country back : the UK press on the eve of the EU referendum', Political Studies Association Annual International Conference - Glasgow, Political Studies Association.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622424-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates a critical discourse analysis the author has conducted of UK mainstream newspaper coverage on the eve of the EU referendum. Immigration became a key issue in the closing days. The paper will explore the possibility that the discourse moved from persuasion to prejudice and xenophobia. The paper will also argue that in the age of populist post-truth politics, some of the newspapers also employed such emotive rhetoric, designed to influence and compel the audience to draw certain conclusions – to get their country back. In so doing, it is argued some of the UK media also pose a serious threat to democracy and journalism – rather than holding those in power to account and maintaining high journalistic standards. The notion that that some of the UK media played on public perceptions and a collective memory that has created, propagated and embedded many myths about the EU for decades, is explored. The possibility this swayed many – despite limited or a lack of substantiation, is explored, a discourse of ellipsis, if you will.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPolitical Studies Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.psa.ac.uk/sites/default/files/conference/papers/2017/Getting our country back. The UK press on the eve of the EU referendum. Paul Rowinski._0.pdfen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectprejudiceen
dc.subjectBrexiten
dc.subjectEU referendumen
dc.subjectpoliticsen
dc.subjectL241 European Union Politicsen
dc.titleGetting our country back : the UK press on the eve of the EU referendumen
dc.typeConference papers, meetings and proceedingsen
dc.date.updated2017-11-27T11:22:44Z-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.