Diasporic experience and the archival process: reflections upon the initial phase of the Black Dance Archives project (UK)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622412
Title:
Diasporic experience and the archival process: reflections upon the initial phase of the Black Dance Archives project (UK)
Authors:
Baddoo, Deborah; Carr, Jane ( 0000-0002-1886-8815 )
Abstract:
State of Trust has been funded to archive ‘collections from eminent individuals and organisations from the British Black dance sector’ (http://blackdancearchives.co.uk/). The Black Dance Archive may be considered as a ‘contingent, dynamic and transformative site’ (Heathfield 2012, 238) whose presence facilitates an historical ‘re-remembering’ (Bindas 2010). It stands as the site of negotiation between ‘Black British’ dance artists and the ‘archontic principle’ (Derrida, 1995) through which the archive retains the traces of a power that consigns documents to their place within a (dominant) signifying system.   Through a diaologic, reflective and trans-disciplinary process, we consider the role of the performance archive within the context of decolonisation. For those artists whose work is included, the transition of artefacts from private to public space marks a legitimization that nevertheless is fraught with the risk of appropriation. The archival process repeats previous tensions between hegemonic dance discourses and the artists’ aims to respond authentically to their lived diasporic experiences. The archive also marks a coming to terms with, even a mourning of, a past that for many of the artists was already shaped by a sense of loss. If, ‘the theory of psychoanalysis… becomes a theory of the archive and not only a theory of memory’ (Derrida 1995, p.18 ), can this archive be conceptualised and experienced in ways that allow for recognition of the lived trauma of diasporic experience while also celebrating how such experiences engendered new danced identities?  
Citation:
Baddoo D, Carr J (2016) 'Diasporic experience and the archival process: reflections upon the initial phase of the Black Dance Archives project (UK)', Society of Dance History Scholars - Claremont.
Issue Date:
6-Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622412
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Drama dance and performing arts

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBaddoo, Deborahen
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:14:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:14:23Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-06-
dc.identifier.citationBaddoo D, Carr J (2016) 'Diasporic experience and the archival process: reflections upon the initial phase of the Black Dance Archives project (UK)', Society of Dance History Scholars - Claremont.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622412-
dc.description.abstractState of Trust has been funded to archive ‘collections from eminent individuals and organisations from the British Black dance sector’ (http://blackdancearchives.co.uk/). The Black Dance Archive may be considered as a ‘contingent, dynamic and transformative site’ (Heathfield 2012, 238) whose presence facilitates an historical ‘re-remembering’ (Bindas 2010). It stands as the site of negotiation between ‘Black British’ dance artists and the ‘archontic principle’ (Derrida, 1995) through which the archive retains the traces of a power that consigns documents to their place within a (dominant) signifying system.   Through a diaologic, reflective and trans-disciplinary process, we consider the role of the performance archive within the context of decolonisation. For those artists whose work is included, the transition of artefacts from private to public space marks a legitimization that nevertheless is fraught with the risk of appropriation. The archival process repeats previous tensions between hegemonic dance discourses and the artists’ aims to respond authentically to their lived diasporic experiences. The archive also marks a coming to terms with, even a mourning of, a past that for many of the artists was already shaped by a sense of loss. If, ‘the theory of psychoanalysis… becomes a theory of the archive and not only a theory of memory’ (Derrida 1995, p.18 ), can this archive be conceptualised and experienced in ways that allow for recognition of the lived trauma of diasporic experience while also celebrating how such experiences engendered new danced identities?  en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectdanceen
dc.subjectdiasporaen
dc.subjectW500 Danceen
dc.titleDiasporic experience and the archival process: reflections upon the initial phase of the Black Dance Archives project (UK)en
dc.typePresentationen
dc.date.updated2017-11-27T11:22:53Z-
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