“God, she’s gonna report me” : the ethics of child protection in poverty research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622393
Title:
“God, she’s gonna report me” : the ethics of child protection in poverty research
Authors:
Bostock, Lisa
Abstract:
The ethics of social research with children has been the source of considerable debate. In particular, issues of how to address potential disclosures of child abuse have been highlighted. What ethical implications are raised, however, when children are the indirect focus of the research? This paper explores the ethical dilemmas of conducting research with mothers about their experiences of caring for children. It is based on qualitative research with 30 mothers on low incomes. The paper concludes that strategies to tackle structural disadvantage as well as those that take account of individual risk are key features of future child welfare.
Citation:
Bostock L (2002) '“God, she’s gonna report me” : the ethics of child protection in poverty research', Children & Society, 16 (4), pp.273-283.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Children & Society
Issue Date:
10-May-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622393
DOI:
10.1002/CHI.712
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/chi.712/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0951-0605
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBostock, Lisaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-17T13:53:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-17T13:53:59Z-
dc.date.issued2002-05-10-
dc.identifier.citationBostock L (2002) '“God, she’s gonna report me” : the ethics of child protection in poverty research', Children & Society, 16 (4), pp.273-283.en
dc.identifier.issn0951-0605-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/CHI.712-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622393-
dc.description.abstractThe ethics of social research with children has been the source of considerable debate. In particular, issues of how to address potential disclosures of child abuse have been highlighted. What ethical implications are raised, however, when children are the indirect focus of the research? This paper explores the ethical dilemmas of conducting research with mothers about their experiences of caring for children. It is based on qualitative research with 30 mothers on low incomes. The paper concludes that strategies to tackle structural disadvantage as well as those that take account of individual risk are key features of future child welfare.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/chi.712/abstracten
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)-
dc.subjectmothersen
dc.subjectpovertyen
dc.subjectchild protectionen
dc.subjectethical issuesen
dc.title“God, she’s gonna report me” : the ethics of child protection in poverty researchen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChildren & Societyen
dc.date.updated2017-11-17T13:40:05Z-
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