Investigating examiner interventions in relation to the listening demands they make on candidates in oral interview tests

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622378
Title:
Investigating examiner interventions in relation to the listening demands they make on candidates in oral interview tests
Authors:
Nakatsuhara, Fumiyo
Other Titles:
Emerging issues in the assessment of second language listening
Abstract:
Examiners intervene in second language oral interviews in order to elicit intended language functions, to probe a candidate’s proficiency level or to keep the interaction going. Interventions of this kind can affect the candidate’s output language and score, since the candidate is obliged to process them as a listener and respond to them as a speaker. This chapter reports on a study that examined forty audio-recorded interviews of the oral test of a major European examination board, with a view to examining examiner interventions (i.e., questions, comments) in relation to the listening demands they make upon candidates. Half of the interviews involved candidates who scored highly on the test while the other half featured low-scoring candidates. This enabled a comparison of the language and behaviour of the same examiner across candidate proficiency levels, to see how they were modified in response to the communicative competence of the candidate. The recordings were transcribed and analyzed with regard to a) types of examiner intervention in terms of linguistic and pragmatic features and b) the extent to which the interventions varied in response to the proficiency level of the candidate. The study provides a new insight into examiner-examinee interactions, by identifying how examiners are differentiating listening demands according to the task types and the perceived proficiency level of the candidate. It offers several implications about the ways in which examiner interventions engage candidates’ listening skills, and the ways in which listening skills can be more validly and reliably measured when using a format based on examiner-candidate interaction.
Citation:
Nakatsuhara F (2018) 'Investigating examiner interventions in relation to the listening demands they make on candidates in oral interview tests', in Wagner E, Ockey G (ed(s).). Emerging issues in the assessment of second language listening: John Benjamins.
Publisher:
John Benjamins
Issue Date:
13-Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622378
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Sponsors:
This research was funded by Trinity College London, and carried out under the Trinity Funded Research Programme.
Appears in Collections:
English language learning and assessment

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNakatsuhara, Fumiyoen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-14T11:46:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-14T11:46:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-13-
dc.identifier.citationNakatsuhara F (2018) 'Investigating examiner interventions in relation to the listening demands they make on candidates in oral interview tests', in Wagner E, Ockey G (ed(s).). Emerging issues in the assessment of second language listening: John Benjamins.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622378-
dc.description.abstractExaminers intervene in second language oral interviews in order to elicit intended language functions, to probe a candidate’s proficiency level or to keep the interaction going. Interventions of this kind can affect the candidate’s output language and score, since the candidate is obliged to process them as a listener and respond to them as a speaker. This chapter reports on a study that examined forty audio-recorded interviews of the oral test of a major European examination board, with a view to examining examiner interventions (i.e., questions, comments) in relation to the listening demands they make upon candidates. Half of the interviews involved candidates who scored highly on the test while the other half featured low-scoring candidates. This enabled a comparison of the language and behaviour of the same examiner across candidate proficiency levels, to see how they were modified in response to the communicative competence of the candidate. The recordings were transcribed and analyzed with regard to a) types of examiner intervention in terms of linguistic and pragmatic features and b) the extent to which the interventions varied in response to the proficiency level of the candidate. The study provides a new insight into examiner-examinee interactions, by identifying how examiners are differentiating listening demands according to the task types and the perceived proficiency level of the candidate. It offers several implications about the ways in which examiner interventions engage candidates’ listening skills, and the ways in which listening skills can be more validly and reliably measured when using a format based on examiner-candidate interaction.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by Trinity College London, and carried out under the Trinity Funded Research Programme.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Benjaminsen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectspeakingen
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.subjectsecond language listeningen
dc.subjectlanguage assessmenten
dc.subjectQ330 English as a second languageen
dc.titleInvestigating examiner interventions in relation to the listening demands they make on candidates in oral interview testsen
dc.title.alternativeEmerging issues in the assessment of second language listeningen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.date.updated2017-11-14T11:15:43Z-
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